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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • October 09, 1944

    Record of Meeting at the Kremlin, Moscow, 9 October 1944, at 10 p.m.

    Churchill, Eden, Stalin, and Molotov discuss the leadership in Poland, Britains interests in Greece and Hong Kong, the actions of Romania and Bulgaria during the war, Turkey, the need for the Great Powers to exert influence on the Balkans to prevent small wars, the leadership of Italy, interests in Bulgaria and Romania, the dividing of Germany and Germany's future, and the American plans in the war against Japan.

  • August 05, 1953

    Summary Record of the Conference held between President Rhee and Secretary Dulles (First Session)

    In early August of 1950, delegates from the United States and the Republic of Korea met to discuss the logistics for the forthcoming conferences centered on the creation of a strong US-ROK mutual defense treaty. The delegates also propose who can and should be present. While both sides agree that North Korea and China should be included, President Rhee advocates that due to India’s Prime Minister’s “pro-communist views,” India should not be invited.

  • 1955

    A British Plan against Saudi Arabia

    Report from Basra of a British plan regarding the Hijaz and Jordanian and Palestinian territories.

  • May 10, 1955

    Report from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Comments on the Asian-African Conference from Capitalist Ruled Countries After the Asian-African Conference'

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry summarizes (predominantly) Western leaders' statements about the Bandung Conference. Secretary Dulles expressed great satisfaction with the "useful and good conference," especially its role in "checking China," while Great Britain expressed strong disapproval of China's behavior at the conference and France was "shocked" that Algeria was discussed. Israel and Australia expressed regret that they were excluded from the conference.

  • December 04, 1979

    Memorandum of conversation between Dutch Prime-Minister Van Agt and Belgian Prime-Minister Wilfried Martens

    Van Agt and Martens discuss how their positions on TNF modernization are being affected by coalition politics within their respective legislatures.

  • December 05, 1979

    Exchange of notes, Defense Minister Scholten (also to other NATO Defense ministers) – British Defense Secretary for Defense

    Defense Minister Scholten writes to other NATO Defense Ministers to clarify the position of the Netherlands on TNF modernization. He focuses on issues related to the size of the modernization program, which in its current state he fears is too large, and also the possibility of separating the issues of making a decision on modernization and then implementing it. The British Defense Secretary then writes to refute each of his concerns on the wider issue of TNF modernization. An addendum focuses more specifically on the issues relating to the Netherlands.

  • January 01, 1985

    Memorandum by Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 'European participation to the Strategic Defense Initiative. Political implications'

    The report seeks to assess the possible strategic and political implications if Europe decides to join the SDI. It is difficult to predict the reaction of the Soviet Union, but ramifications for East-West relations cannot be ignored.

  • April 05, 1989

    Record of Conversation between M.S. Gorbachev and Prime Minister of Great Britain Margaret Thatcher (at the Airport and on the way to the Embassy), London

    M.S. Gorbachev and Margaret Thatcher discuss global geopolitical issues, particularly growing terrorist organizations across Africa.

  • May 08, 1990

    Memorandum of Conversation Chancellor Franz Vranitzky – Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, London

    The document contains a conversation between Chancellor Franz Vranitzky and Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher. Thatcher begins with the state of internal affairs in Great Britain then relates its position to the European Union and role in German Unification. The conversation then turns to the role of Austria and its effort to join the European Commission. In the wake of problems in Eastern Europe, Thatcher stresses her preference for Western Europe to avoid involving itself in the counter movements.