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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • March 13, 1948

    Message, Chamberlin to Headquarters, European Command

    Director of the US Army’s Intelligence Division at the Pentagon, Lieutenant General Stephen J. Chamberlin, instructed American military attachés from eight European capitals to meet with one of his subordinates, Colonel Riley F. Ennis, for a conference in Frankfurt am Main in Germany on March 24 to discuss intelligence matters pertaining to Soviet activities in Germany.

  • December 11, 1961

    Comments of N. S. Khrushchev, 11 December 1961

    Krushchev dictates his ideas for a general memorandum that he will give to Kroll. The memorandum will describe the situation in Germany and the possible development of Soviet-West German relations. It should demonstrate to West Germany the economic and political advantages of improving its relationship with the Soviet Union. Khrushchev describes the potential for West Germany's allies to capitalize on Cold War tensions in Germany and concludes that better relations with the Soviet Union will make West Germany a more active force in East-West relations and lead to a more stable balance of power.

  • October 26, 1962

    Memorandum of Conversation, West German Foreign Minister Gerhard Schröder and Soviet Ambassador Andrei Smirnov, Bonn

    A discussion between Federal Minister Schröder and Soviet Ambassador Smirnow [Smirnov] in which Smirnov presents to the minister a statement of the Soviet Government concerning the aggressive acts the United States had committed against the Republic of Cuba. In this statement the Soviet Government was explaining its view on the blockade the United States had imposed on Cuba. It also commented on the other aggressive steps President Kennedy intended to take against Cuba as announced on 22 October.

  • March 10, 1967

    US Embassy Bonn Telegram 10500 to State Department, 'Ambassador Foster’s Meeting with Chancellor Kiesinger'

    To try to strengthen West German confidence, ACDA director William C. Foster met with Chancellor Kiesinger, who expressed concern about the danger of “erosion” and “uncertainty” in U.S.-West German relations and the need for more time for consultations. Kiesinger’s “own idea was that it would have been better …to have discussed all aspects of non-proliferation ‘behind locked doors’ before any intention of signing the treaty had become public.”

  • March 21, 1967

    US Department of State Airgram CA-6579 to US Embassy Moscow, 'Kosygin's Remarks on Non-Proliferation in London'

    In this Airgram, the U.S. embassy in Bonn sent a translation of Soviet Prime Minister Alexei Kosygin's tough statement on the NPT at a press conference in London. Kosygin stated (of West Germany) "whether she wants this or not, such a document should be signed, because we will not allow the Federal Republic of Germany to possess nuclear weapons."

  • April 06, 1967

    US Embassy Bonn Telegram 11806 to State Department, 'Vice President’s Visit III: Non-Proliferation Treaty'

    During this discussion with Vice President Humphrey, Kiesinger declared that the NPT was a “serious problem,” but said that he disagreed with some West German conservatives that it was “was not politically acceptable.” For Kiesinger, the problem was the Soviet Union, “which for years, and without any reason had attacked, slandered and threatened” West Germany.

  • October 10, 1969

    Working Material for the Preparation of a European Security Conference

    An analysis written by the GDR's Ministry of Foreign Affairs on the respective positions of European socialist states, socialist states in general, and NATO and other capitalist European states, on the organization of a European security conference, as well as guidance for carrying out the CSCE negotiations based upon an analysis of each side's perceived strengths and weaknesses

  • October 28, 1969

    Telegram Number 2142-08, 'Conversation with the Deputy-Minister of Foreign Affairs (Europe)'

    Luo Guibo is curious about developments in West German-Soviet relations and the Conference on European Security, while Etienne Manac’h inquires about China's appointment of ambassadors to Europe.

  • December 24, 1969

    Telegram Number 2592/98, 'China and the German Problem'

    French diplomat in Beijing Etienne Manac’h writes that "China is very concerned by the trend towards détente emerging in East-West relations."

  • March 10, 1970

    Memorandum for President Nixon from Kissinger, "The Current Status of Brandt's Ostpolitik"

    A memorandum for President Nixon from National Security Advisor Henry Kissinger on the current status of West German Chancellor Willy Brandt's "Ostpolitik" or Eastern Policy, which sought to normalize relations between West Germany and the communist countries.

  • October 20, 1970

    Attitudes and Measures of the Warsaw Treaty States for Convening a Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe, 1970-1971

    An analysis of the Warsaw Pact states' interests and goals in the Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe negotiations, including discussion of the military, territorial, economic, cultural, and scientific-technical aspects of the negotiations.

  • April 05, 1971

    Memorandum for President Nixon from Kissinger, "The Berlin Negotiations - New Guidelines"

    National Security Advisor Henry Kissinger updates President Nixon on the status of the Four Power Berlin negotiations between the Soviet Union, East Germany, West Germany, and the United States.

  • July 21, 1971

    Memorandum for President Nixon from Kissinger, "Berlin Negotiations: The Unresolved Issues"

    National Security Advisor Henry Kissinger updates President Nixon on the status of the Four Power Berlin negotiations between the Soviet Union, East Germany, West Germany, and the United States, focusing on unresolved issues on which the four states were unable to agree.

  • October 11, 1973

    Meeting of Prime Minister Trudeau and Premier Zhou Enlai at the State Guest House (Diaoyutai)

    Zhou Enlai offers Canadian Prime Minister Trudeau an extensive history of the Chinese Civil War and Chinese Revolution. Zhou also comments on China's foreign policy positions toward and views on the Soviet Union, nuclear war, Bangladesh, revisionism, and great power hegemony, among other topics.

  • November 14, 1979

    Letter by the Chairman of the SPD, Brandt, to the General Secretary of the CC of the CPSU, Brezhnev

    Willy Brandt writes to Leonid Brezhnev about SALT II and tensions between the U.S. and USSR over missile placement in Europe. Brandt ask to start a dialog for exchange of ideas and to found a common ground for international development, involving Russians.

  • March 11, 1980

    Letter to the Chairman of the Social Democratic Party of Germany, Chairman of the Socialist International, Willy Brandt

    A letter from Brezhnev to Willy Brandt before their meeting in Madrid. Discusses detente and the disarmament.

  • August 28, 1980

    Letter by the General Secretary of the CC of the CPSU, Gorbachev, to the Chairman of the SPD, Brandt

  • September 17, 1980

    Letter from SPD Chairman Brandt to General Secretary of CPSU Central Committee Brezhnev

    Willy Brandt writes to Leonid Brezhnev about issues plaguing arms control negotiations between the US and the USSR. Particular attention is paid to the way the US Presidential election has hampered progress.

  • December 12, 1980

    Memorandum of Conversation between Brandt and V. Semyonov on 11 December 1980

  • July 06, 1981

    Conversation between SPD chairman Willy Brandt and the Secretary of the Central Committee of the CPSU Leonid Brezhnev on 30 June 1981 in Moscow

    Memorandum of a conversation between Brandt and Brezhnev. Among other things, Brezhnev focused on the increased hostility between members of the international community. He pointed to debate over missiles in Europe as an example of that tension.