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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • July 27, 1934

    Letter from Cdes. Stalin, Molotov, and Voroshilov to Governor Sheng Shicai

    While expressing appreciate for Sheng's role in pacifying Xinjiang and expressing their firm trust in him, Stalin, Molotov, and Voroshilov deny his request to join the Communist Party and express their disagreement with the opinions he expressed in his earlier letter. Citing Xinjiang's economic backwardness, they condemn the rapid implementation of Communism in Xinjiang as a "ludicrous" idea and also advise against overthrowing the Nanjing government.

  • November 01, 1934

    Letter from Governer Shicai Sheng to Cdes. Stalin, Molotov, and Voroshilov

    Responding to Stalin, Molotov, and Voroshilov's letter of 27 July, Sheng expresses his agreement with their assertions about Xinjiang's unsuitability for Communist rule and the inadvisability of overthrowing the Nanjing government. Accepting that he cannot become a member of the Communist Party at this time, Sheng expresses his gratitude for the Soviet assistance he has received and requests that he and Consul General Apresov be permitted to travel to Moscow.

  • September 02, 1938

    A Conversation Between Cdes. Stalin, Molotov, and Voroshilov and the Governor Shicai Sheng which Occurred in the Kremlin on 2 September 1938

    Stalin, Molotov, Voroshilov, and Governor Sheng discuss Xinjiang's military, level of industrialization, and natural resources, as well as Governor Sheng's strong desire to join the Communist Party.

  • August 06, 1953

    Summary Memorandum, US-ROK Mutual Defense Treaty (August 6)

    In 1953, Secretary Dulles met President Rhee to discuss the US-ROK mutual defense treaty. This summary memorandum notes twelve of Rhee’s requests and/or points he will like this treaty to incorporate. These include the number of ROKA divisions, which economic model the US should use to help Korea’s economy, and the request for moral and material support for the ROK to resume war with the north. This summary also notes whether the US granted, wanted to further discuss, or rejected each point.

  • December 21, 1955

    From the Journal of Pavel F. Yudin: Record of Conversation with Mao Zedong on 21 December 1955

    Mao Zedong discusses the progress of collectivizing agriculture in China as well as the state takeover of private industries in cities.

  • October 19, 1956

    Briefing on the Visit to China of Pakistani Prime Minister Suhrawardy (No. 3)

    The premiers of Pakistan and China convene to discuss Taiwan, Pakistani-Chinese relations, Mao's leadership, and the Muslim population in China, among other issues.

  • July 22, 1958

    Minutes of Conversation, Mao Zedong and Ambassador Yudin

    Mao Zedong held this conversation with Yudin in the context of the emerging dispute between Beijing and Moscow on establishing a Chinese-Soviet joint submarine flotilla.

  • January 01, 1961

    Report from Polish Military Attache in Beijing

    Military Attache Siwicki reports on the year's biggest issues such as; the economic crisis in China, Great Chinese Famine; discrepancies in ideology between USSR and China, such as questions of loyalty to Communist cause in the leadership and army; Chinese's interest in weapons of mass destruction; poor condition of Chinese army and society in general; and China's imperialist goals and overview of interactions with other countries

  • April 30, 1962

    Minutes of Conversation between Deng Xiaoping and the North Korean Ambassador to China Han Ik-su

    Chairman of China Deng Xiaoping and the DPRK Ambassador to China Han Ik-su exchange views about the relationship between China and North Korea. They reiterate the need to strengthen the unity of socialist camp and the fraternal relationship between China and North Korea. They also agree that the truth about communism is to combine Marxism-Leninism with the actual conditions of one’s own country, not to blindly follow Soviet Union dogma in all circumstances.

  • June 29, 1962

    Memorandum of Conversation, Albanian Labor Party Delegation with Mao Zedong

    The delegation from the Albanian Labour Party meets with Chairman Mao Zedong, where both parties express disapproval toward Krushchev's policies of De-Stalinization. The Albanian delegates reaffirm their belief in the general Communist party of the USSR, despite Krushchev's actions.

  • March 06, 1963

    Record of Conversation from Chairman Mao's Reception of the Delegation of the Brazilian Communist Party (The New Party)

    Chairman Mao addresses the communist compulsion to revolution and past cases of revolutionary activities like the Cuban experience.

  • March 13, 1963

    Cable from the CCPCC International Liaison Department and the Foreign Ministry, 'Key Points of the Conversation from Chairman of the CCP CC Comrade Mao Zedong’s Reception of the Soviet Ambassador to China Comrade Chernovenko'

    Mao Zedong discusses the relationship between China and the Soviet Union and the debate between the two Parties, proposes a meeting for fraternal discussion, and commits to countering Western imperialism.

  • February 08, 1964

    Record of Conversation from Chairman Mao Zedong's Reception of the Cambodian Ambassador to China Sisowath Sirik Matak

    Mao and Matak discuss Western imperialist collaboration with India, attempts to overthrow the Cambodian government, and the situation in Vietnam, among other topics.

  • June 29, 1964

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Premier Zhou Talked about the Relationship between China-Soviet Difference and the National Liberation Movement'

    Account of Zhou's conversation with Kenyan officials, including discussions of the Sino-Soviet debate, imperialist manipulation of the debate, and enhanced US pressure in Asia, Africa, and Latin America.

  • January 09, 1966

    Secret Letter from the Indian Embassy in Beijing to the Foreign Secretary in New Delhi, No. PEK/104/66, 'China and the West'

    The Indian Embassy in Beijing sent a letter to the Indian Foreign Secretary to prove an analysis of Chinese foreign policy, such as Beijing's relationship with the West and the impact of Sino-Soviet split on Chinese foreign relations.

  • 1967

    CSSR Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 'Information: The Most Recent Developments in the Chinese People’s Republic and the CSSR-Chinese Relations'

    Extensive account of CSSR-Chinese relations, including controversy surrounding the Cultural Revolution and Chinese extremism, anti-Soviet proclivities within the Chinese leadership, and the Chinese hydrogen bomb test on June 17th.

  • October 09, 1967

    CSSR Ministry of Foreign Affairs No. No. 026.235/67-3, 'Information about Most Recent Measures against the Activities of the Representative Office of the Chinese People’s Republic'

    Account of measures taken in response to provocative activities of the CPR (threats, propaganda, restrictions on freedom of movement, etc) and objectives in pursuing these responses.

  • May 06, 1968

    Cable from the CSSR Embassy, Peking, 'Thesis and Proposals for the Development of an Action Plan of the Communist Party and Government of Czechoslovakia regarding the Relations between Czechoslovakia and Chinese People’s Republic'

    Proposals for Communist Party action regarding the CPR activity, including overall objectives in the CSSR-PRC relationship, general foreign policy outlook, and specific measures like fighting against the theory of "two Chinas."

  • August 06, 1971

    Letter of Enver Hoxha, Central Committee of the Party of Labor of Albania, to Mao Zedong, Central Committee of the Chinese Communist Party

    In a letter to Chairman Mao and the Central Committee of the Communist Party of China, Enver Hoxha wrote, on behalf of the Labor Party of Albandia, about Albania's position regarding President Nixon's upcoming visit to China. Albania did not approve nor support this visit due to American imperialism and U.S. protests against Marxism-Lenninism.

  • November 12, 1973

    Memorandum of Conversation between Mao Zedong and Henry Kissinger

    Secretary of State Henry Kissinger met with Chairman Mao and Zhou Enlai. The three discussed a large range of topics from Sino-Soviet relations to the Middle East to the influence of Chinese communism.