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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • February 19, 1946

    Memorandum of Conversation of the Soviet Ambassador to China A.A. Petrov with the Chinese Minister of Foreign Affairs Wang Shijie

    Soviet Ambassaodr Petrov reports on a conversation with the Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Shijie. Shijie raises concerns about disputes between the Soviet and Chinese administration over the withdrawl of Soviet troops from the region and the control of property seized from the Japanese during the war. Petrov also raises the issue of Anti-Soviet demonstrations and propaganda in China.

  • February 02, 1953

    Memorandum of Conversation, Soviet Ambassador to China A.S. Paniushkin with the Chair of the City People’s Government in Beijing, Peng Zhen, 6 January 1953

    Peng Zhen talked about the great significance for China of the 19th Congress of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union. Regarding difficulties that the CCP struggled with in the first year after the formation of the PRC, Peng Zhen said that at that time the party needed to carry on significant work regarding the ideological reeducation of a significant part of the intelligentsia, which incorrectly understood the role and significance of the Soviet Union in the matter of the victory of the revolution in China.

  • July 18, 1960

    Letter, Khrushchev to the Central Committee of The Socialist Unity Party of Germany, regarding Soviet Specialists in China

    Khruschev reports Chinese dissatisfaction with Soviet specialists that had been placed in China to aid in socialist economic, cultural, and military development. He notes that despite the dissatisfaction, the CCP insists that they remain in China. However, due to recent complaints by the specialists about being propagandized by the Chinese against the CPSU, the Soviet government has decided to withdraw the specialists from China.

  • July 18, 1960

    Note, the Soviet Embassy in Beijing to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the People’s Republic of China

    The Soviet Embassy reports that in response to Chinese dissatisfaction with Soviet experts, as well as Chinese disrespectful behavior towards the Soviets, the Embassy is recalling all Soviet experts and advisors from the country.

  • September 04, 1963

    From the Diary of O. T. Darusenkov, Record of a Conversation with Cuban Minister of Industry Ernesto Guevara, 27 August 1963

    Guevara discusses Cuban economic development, Chinese anti-Soviet propaganda, a proposed PURS (United Party of the Socialist Revolution) party program, and a training program for Cubans in the Soviet Union.

  • September 24, 1963

    Report on Visit of the Society of Chinese-Soviet Friendship to the Soviet Union, T. Skvortsov-Tokarin

    Report on a tour group of Chinese citizens from the Society of Chinese-Soviet Friendship. The group visited Moscow, Tbilisi, Sochi, Kiev, Riga, and Leningrad. The Soviet guides were frustrated by the groups' argumentative behavior and attempts to speak directly to Soviet workers. The group was especially interested in finding out if Soviet listeners heard broadcasts of Radio Beijing.

  • January 24, 1964

    From the Diary of A. S. Anikin, Record of a Conversation with the Ambassador of the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic to Cuba, Cde. Pavlicek, 4 January 1964

    Pavlicek reports that Chinese representatives in Cuba have launched an anti-Soviet propaganda campaign, aimed towards all levels of the Cuban population. He mentions that many Cubans in favor of Chinese propaganda activity have expressed the opinion that China will support Cuban revolutionary activity in Latin America.

  • January 24, 1964

    From the Diary of A. S. Anikin, Record of a Conversation with the Charge d’Affaires of the Polish People’s Republic in Cuba, Ye. Siurus, 6 January 1964

    Siurus specifies how representatives of the Chinese embassy in Havana are spreading negative propaganda and the Soviet Union in Cuba. Trade negotiations with Poland and Cuban sugar exports to Britain are also discussed.

  • April 28, 1965

    Record of Telephone Conversation, 'Xinjiang’s Plan to Hold an Exhibition of Evidence against the Soviet Revisionists'

    Chinese officials decide not to lend "original evidence" of the Soviet Union's subversive activities to the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region.

  • April 28, 1965

    Cable from the Department of Consular Affairs, Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Xinjiang’s Plan to Hold an Exhibition of Evidence against the Soviet Revisionists'

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry weighs in on whether or not Xinjiang should hold an anti-Soviet exhibit during the 15th anniversary celebrations of the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region.

  • May 12, 1965

    Note by the East German Embassy in Hanoi on a Joint Conversation with the Ambassadors from other Socialist Countries in the Hungarian Embassy on 4 May 1965

    Soviet Ambassador Ilya Shcherbakov informs a meeting of Socialist Ambassadors of Soviet-Vietnamese talks in Moscow. He notes that the United States realizes it does not have the international support for Vietnam that it had expected, and that the Soviet Union will continue to support Vietnam in the struggle. He argues that there is still much anti-Soviet propaganda in Vietnam, which comes from the Chinese, and points out three positions of the Chinese that he does not understand.

  • July 09, 1965

    Note on a Conversation with an Unnamed Representative of the International Department of the CPSU CC on the Situation in Vietnam [Excerpts]

    An unnamed Soviet official explains that Chinese officers and advisors in Vietnam are discouraging the use of Soviet weapons, despite the fact that they are the most modern and effective.

  • August 19, 1965

    Note by the East German Envoy to Moscow, Rossmeisl, on Talks with Unnamed Soviet Vietnam Specialists

    Unnamed Soviet specialists claim that the USSR's aid to Vietnam is worth 1 million rubles per day. They also argue that because of the amount of aid, the Chinese propaganda claiming a lack of Soviet aid is losing ground among the population in North Vietnam, although the rumor still persists in the South.

  • July 09, 1966

    Note on a Conversation with the First Secretary of the Soviet Embassy, Comrade Sverev, on 8 July 1966 from 11:00 a.m. to 12:40 p.m. at the Soviet Embassy in Hanoi

    Conversation with First Secretary of the Soviet Embassy, Sverev, describing the Vietnamese attitude toward China as becoming colder. At the same time, printing of China's anti-Soviet propaganda has become more limited and the Vietnamese appear grateful for Soviet aid. Sverev also estimates that there are over 200,000 Chinese troops stationed in North Vietnam.

  • 1967

    CSSR Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 'Information: The Most Recent Developments in the Chinese People’s Republic and the CSSR-Chinese Relations'

    Extensive account of CSSR-Chinese relations, including controversy surrounding the Cultural Revolution and Chinese extremism, anti-Soviet proclivities within the Chinese leadership, and the Chinese hydrogen bomb test on June 17th.

  • October 09, 1967

    CSSR Ministry of Foreign Affairs No. No. 026.235/67-3, 'Information about Most Recent Measures against the Activities of the Representative Office of the Chinese People’s Republic'

    Account of measures taken in response to provocative activities of the CPR (threats, propaganda, restrictions on freedom of movement, etc) and objectives in pursuing these responses.

  • July 08, 1968

    Political Report No.12 from the Embassy of the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic, Peking

    Account addressed to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs regarding gradual normalization of communications and relations with China, including conclusions and recommendations for future policy like removal of limits on free movement by the Chinese representative office in Prague.

  • January, 1969

    East German Report on the Second Interkit Meeting in Berlin, January 1969

    Report from the East German representatives on an Interkit meeting held 28-31 January, 1969. The group made recommendations for coordinating anti-Maoist propaganda to counter China's increasing anti-Sovietism.

  • September 22, 1969

    Stenographic Record of Meeting of Khabarovsk Regional and City Party Officials

    Stenographic records of a meeting of Soviet Communist Party officials and activists in the regions bordering the People’s Republic of China. They respond to news of the meeting between Aleksei Kosygin and Zhou Enlai in Beijing on 11 September1969. Although they all applauded Kosygin’s meeting with Zhou, some speakers noted that little change in the border situation had been observed since their encounter eleven days before. Relations along the border remained tense with regular incursions from Chinese citizens into Soviet territory.

  • March 10, 1970

    East German Report on the Third Interkit Meeting in Warsaw, March 1970

    This East German report, issued after the Interkit meeting in Warsaw, addresses the situation in China under the leadership of Mao Zedong. Among the issues discussed are the ninth congress of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) and Mao's anti-Soviet foreign policy, especially China's relations with the US and West Germany. The ninth congress of the CCP is said to have stabilized Mao's position and is seen as the founding congress of a new party. Among other topics, the delegates also discuss ways to improve anti-Maoist propaganda.