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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • November 09, 1944

    Letter No. 402 from L.D. Wilgress, Canadian Embassy, Moscow, to the Secretary of State for External Affairs, W.L. Mackenzie King

    The Canadian Ambassador to the Soviet Union, L.D. Wilgress, thoroughly reviews Soviet foreign policy in Europe, Asia, and in Latin America and its relations with the United States and the United Kingdom. Wilgress optimistically concludes that "the Soviet Government are desirous of co-operating fully with the other great powers."

  • November, 1945

    Handwritten Note from Molotov to Cde. Stalin, conveying Message from S. Saracoglu

    Molotov suggests that Prime Minister of the Turkish Republic Şükrü Saracoğlu's telegram congratulating Stalin on the 28th anniversary of the October Revolution be published in the press.

  • April 23, 1949

    Untitled report on Turkey

    Reports of Soviet spying on Turkish and United States military activity in Iskenderun, Turkey.

  • June 27, 1949

    Untitled report on the Turkish movement against Communism

    A memo detailing communist activities indicates Russian ties in Beirut, smuggling along the Syrian-Turkish border, and Russian contact with the Kurdish Democratic Party.

  • August 03, 1949

    Untitled report on Soviet interests in the Middle East

    The Russian Commission is showing interest in the Middle East, especially in Turkish-Syrian collaboration and American and British support for a Turkish fight against communism.

  • December 28, 1950

    Untitled report about Turkey

    Report on Turkish collaboration with Arab countries in a common defense against Russia and Turkish journalists acting as Israeli agents.

  • June, 2007

    Actions to Promote Discord. Folder 90. The Chekist Anthology.

    Contains information on active measures undertaken by the KGB residency in Ankara, Turkey during the late 1970’s and early 1980’s. The residency carried out active measures to destabilize Turkey’s military regime, undermine US military personnel’s sense of security through the publication of threatening leaflets, inflame the rivalry between Greece and Turkey, and foster anti-American sentiments. Mitrokhin provides detailed descriptions of several operations involving altered or fabricated personal correspondence, as well as newspaper articles written by, or ‘inspired’ by KGB agents or confidential contacts. The KGB residency claimed that these operations resulted in, among other things, the removal of Foreign Minister Nuri Birgi from office, and the expulsion of several American diplomats for allegedly interfering with Turkish elections.