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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • January 31, 1949

    Notes by Anastas Mikoyan ahead of Meetings with Mao Zedong

    Notes taken by Minister of Foreign Trade Anastas Mikoyan during a meeting with Mao Zedong in Beijing. They discuss relations with the United States and other Western powers and the nationalization of foreign-owned factories in China. Mikoyan also gave advice on developing the new Communist government in China. Noteably, Mikoyan wrote that "the path of the regime of the people’s democracies, or the path of the Russian Soviet revolution, is not quite appropriate for China. China has its own path of development."

  • February 03, 1949

    Cable, Filippov [Stalin] to Anastas Mikoyan

    Cable from Stalin to Mikoyan, sent with the intent to be passed on to Mao Zedong. Stalin expresses pleasure with the Chinese control of China's peasantry and students, but expresses disappointment that the CCP does not control the majority of the working class. Stalin advises that China turn its big cities into bases for communism, and then gives more specific advice for gaining a majority among the working class. Stalin then responds to Mao's request for weapons, explaining that the USSR doesn't have anti-tank and anti-aircraft weapons of foreign make, but can send Russian-made weapons.

  • December 24, 1949

    Report, Kovalev to Stalin

    Kovalev discusses seceral questions on the policy and pratice of the CCP CC. Topics include: data on the economic situation in the country, the Chinese working class, the Chinese peasantry and the land reform, the CCP, the Chinese press, the Chinese state apparatus, the Chinese army, the Chinese intelligentsia, the Chinese attitude toward the national bourgeoisie, the Chinese attitude toward foreign capital, the class struggle in China, and Chinese foreign policy.

  • October 22, 1954

    Abstract of Talk between Nehru, Chen Yun, and Vice Premier Li Fuchun

    Record of conversation between Indian and Chinese delegations, on a wide variety of issues in China. Conversation covers the structure of Chinese government, management of the bureaucracy, handling of finances, and plans for improving education and productivity levels.

  • January 09, 1966

    Secret Letter from the Indian Embassy in Beijing to the Foreign Secretary in New Delhi, No. PEK/104/66, 'China and the West'

    The Indian Embassy in Beijing sent a letter to the Indian Foreign Secretary to prove an analysis of Chinese foreign policy, such as Beijing's relationship with the West and the impact of Sino-Soviet split on Chinese foreign relations.

  • August 14, 1966

    Note from the Conversation between Ambassador Jerzy Knothe and Prime Minister Zhou Enlai during the ambassador’s farewell visit, August 14, 1966

    Ambassador Jerzy Knothe and Prime Minister Zhou Enlai discuss ongoing Chinese class struggles.

  • 1967

    CSSR Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 'Information: The Most Recent Developments in the Chinese People’s Republic and the CSSR-Chinese Relations'

    Extensive account of CSSR-Chinese relations, including controversy surrounding the Cultural Revolution and Chinese extremism, anti-Soviet proclivities within the Chinese leadership, and the Chinese hydrogen bomb test on June 17th.

  • October 09, 1967

    CSSR Ministry of Foreign Affairs No. No. 026.235/67-3, 'Information about Most Recent Measures against the Activities of the Representative Office of the Chinese People’s Republic'

    Account of measures taken in response to provocative activities of the CPR (threats, propaganda, restrictions on freedom of movement, etc) and objectives in pursuing these responses.

  • October 12, 1967

    Memorandum of Conversation between Albanian Labor Party Delegation and the Chinese Communist Party Leadership

    The record of a meeting between Mao Zedong and the Albanian Labor Party delegation. Mao describes the current condition of China in regards to some fighting that still continues and the waning enthusiasm of the population for continued violence.

  • May 06, 1968

    Cable from the CSSR Embassy, Peking, 'Thesis and Proposals for the Development of an Action Plan of the Communist Party and Government of Czechoslovakia regarding the Relations between Czechoslovakia and Chinese People’s Republic'

    Proposals for Communist Party action regarding the CPR activity, including overall objectives in the CSSR-PRC relationship, general foreign policy outlook, and specific measures like fighting against the theory of "two Chinas."

  • March 06, 1970

    Embassy of the GDR in the PR China, 'Note about the Club Meeting of the Ambassadors and Acting Ambassadors of Hungary, the GDR, Czechoslovakia, the USSR, Poland, Bulgaria, and Mongolia on 24 February 1970 in the Embassy of Czechoslovakia'

    Socialist bloc ambassadors discuss China’s domestic and foreign policy, with some emphasis on Shanghai and Guangzhou.

  • April 27, 1970

    Embassy of the GDR in the PR China, 'Note about the Club Meeting of the Ambassadors and Acting Ambassadors of Hungary, Czechoslovakia, the GDR, the Soviet Union, Bulgaria, Poland, and Mongolia on 17 April 1970 in the Embassy of Poland'

    A report on the current domestic situation of China and their foreign policy.

  • September 05, 1970

    Telegram, Embassy of Hungary in North Korea to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    A telegram from the Embassy of Hungary in North Korea recounting Kim Il Sung's views on Japan and China, as expressed during a meeting at the Soviet embassy.

  • July 03, 1972

    East German Report on the Fifth Interkit Meeting in Prague, July 1972

    This East German report, issued after the Interkit meeting in Prague, addresses the domestic and foreign policies of China. It makes reference to internal conflicts destabilizing the Chinese leadership. China is said to be enhancing its military potential, especially in the area of missiles and nuclear weapons. Its aims in foreign policy are to acquire a leadership position in the so-called "Third World", to expand its relations with capitalist countries, to damage the unity of the Socialist bloc, and to obstruct the foreign relations of the Soviet Union. Considering the increase of influence of China on North Korea, Romania, and Vietnam, as well as on the Communist parties in Spain and Italy, the Socialist countries must improve their anti-Maoist propaganda efforts.

  • June, 1975

    East German Report on the Eight Interkit Meeting in Ulaanbaatar, June 1975

    This report, issued after the eighth Interkit meeting in Ulaanbaatar, addresses the domestic and foreign policies of China and the anti-Maoist propaganda measures to be undertaken by Socialist countries. There are no great expectations for a collapse of Maoism, even though the Chinese economy is developing slowly. China is acquiring nuclear weapons and missiles in preparation for an armed conflict. Beijing's foreign relations with Western countries are considered to be detrimental to international détente and directed against the interests of the Soviet Union and the Socialist countries.

  • May 05, 1976

    Ministry for State Security of the GDR, 'Information about Some Aspects of the Domestic, Economic, and Foreign Policy of the PR China'

    A report given to high level officials in the SED Central Committee and GDR Foreign Ministry. The report discusses the 'Criticize Deng' campaign, current agricultural and industrial developments in China, and China's economic relations with West Germany, Japan, and the United States. The report also provides commentary from China experts in the US State Department, discussing future perspectives for Chinese foreign policy.

  • April 15, 1977

    Informational Note on the Meeting of the Representatives of International Departments of Six Fraternal Parties

    The CPSU, PUWP, SED, CPCz, HWSP, and BCP met to discuss an upcoming conference devoted to the discussion of the “Problems of Peace and Socialism.” China was another focus of the meeting, particularly the implications of the expansion of its industrial-military complex.

  • May 31, 1977

    Embassy of the GDR in the USSR, Political Department, 'Note about a Meeting with Comrade Kireyev, Deputy Head of the 1st Far Eastern Department of the MID on 24 May 1977'

    A description of Chinese domestic policy, specifically the continuation of Maoism, differences in policy held by political leaders (Hua Guofeng and Ye Jianying), and the campaign against the Gang of Four. China's foreign policy, specifically towards the Soviet Union, USA, Japan, and India is also discussed.

  • June, 1977

    East German Report, 'China after Mao Zedong'

    This study gives an account on the domestic and foreign policies of China after the death of Mao Zedong. The first part of the document is dedicated to the domestic policies of the Chinese government. It analyzes the ideological backgrounds of the new leadership as well as the economic situation, while emphasizing unsolved problems in industry and agriculture. A closer look at Beijing's defense spending leads the authors to the conclusion that China is enhancing its military potential and preparing for war.

  • May 28, 1984

    Report from the Visit in Moscow on May 14-19, 1984, at the Academic Conference on 'The Problems of Security and Peace in the Far East'

    The conference involved the participation of major Sinological centers and representatives of the foreign ministries of nine countries (Bulgaria, Hungary, the GDR, Mongolia, Poland, Cuba, Vietnam, Czechoslovakia, and the Soviet Union). It focused on aspects of peace and security in the Far East.