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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • January 31, 1955

    Address by Zhou Enlai at the Plenary Session of the Fourth Meeting of the State Council (Excerpt)

    Zhou Enlai addresses the State Council citing a need for China to "master atomic energy." The Chinese program is far behind in this area, but plans to catch up with the help of Soviet technical assistance.

  • April 23, 1956

    Chinese Communist Party Central Committee Circular concerning the Transfer of Cadres and Workers to Participate in Atomic Energy Development Work (Excerpt)

    A Chinese Central Committee circular stresses the need for China to develop a healthy uranium prospecting and mining industry, and to transfer technical and administrative cadres to work with Soviet experts.

  • July 11, 1957

    Handwritten Letter from Nie Rongzhen to Zhou Enlai on the Development of the Atomic Energy Industry

    A letter to Zhou Enlai informing him that the industrial development plan for China's atomic energy program has not been finalized and that the technical agreement with the Soviet Union must be delayed.

  • August 12, 1957

    Letter from Zhang Wentian to the Soviet Chargé Concerning the Development of the Atomic Energy Industry

    A letter from the Chinese Vice Minister of Foreign Affairs to the Soviet Chargé informing him that revisions must be made to the “Agreement on the Provision of Technical Assistance from the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics to the People’s Republic of China in Establishing an Atomic Energy Industry,” and that until it is revised the delivery of technical equipment should be delayed.

  • June 20, 1959

    Letter from the Communist Party of the Soviet Union Central Committee to the Chinese Communist Party Central Committee on the Temporary Halt in Nuclear Assistance

    The Soviet Central Committee informs their Chinese counterparts that, in light of the arms reduction talks taking place in Geneva, Soviet nuclear assistance must cease. The Chinese had requested a sample atomic bomb and technical data, but the Soviet feared that doing so would imperil the efforts of the socialist countries in Geneva.

  • July 03, 1960

    Report by Nie Rongzhen to Mao Zedong Regarding Science and Technology (Abridged)

    Nie Rongzhen reports to Mao on scientific and technical issues and Soviet assistance and cooperation in the area of nuclear development. The Chinese were becoming frustrated by what they called the Soviet "stranglehold" on key technical data, and led to an unwanted feeling of dependence on their Soviet comrades.

  • June 15, 1965

    Notice of the Members of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research

    The Joint Institute for Nuclear Research discusses plans for scientific research and development from 1966 through 1970, and Chinese representatives announce their plan to withdraw from the Joint Institute on 1 July, 1965

  • September 18, 1965

    National Science Committee, Briefings on Receiving Foreign Guests, No. 1

    Description of the first meeting between members of a special team at the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the visiting Atomic Energy Group of the Indonesian Economic Delegation. The Indonesian delegation explains that the main goal of the delegation's China visit is to understand the status of China's research on atomic energy, making a number of requests to visit and learn about relevant atomic laboratories, nuclear reactors, and potentially send staff to research together with Chinese experts.

  • September 20, 1965

    National Science Committee, Briefings on Receiving Foreign Guests, No. 2

    Report on the second meeting with the Atomic Energy Group of the Indonesian Economic Delegation. The head of the delegation asks to visit factors and labs that select uranium ore and process raw materials into fuel. In negotiations, the Indonesian side proposes longterm cooperation between Indonesia and China on atomic energy, and protective measures against nuclear radiation.

  • September 23, 1965

    National Science Committee, Briefings on Receiving Foreign Guests, No. 4

    4th report on the visit of the Atomic Energy Group of the Indonesian Economic Delegation. Summarizes the group's visit to various science departments at Peking University, and the visit to laboratories of nuclear physics, electronics, and radiation chemistry, along with several other science department laboratories. Describes the "very positive reactions" of the visiting group, and the group's request to send Indonesian exchange students to Peking University.

  • September 25, 1965

    National Science Committee, Briefings on Receiving Foreign Guests, No. 7

    7th report on the visit of the Atomic Energy Group of the Indonesian Economic Delegation. Indonesian atomic energy group visits the No. 2 Institute of Atomic Energy Research in China, touring various facilities in the institute including a heavy water reactor built with Soviet aid. Report notes the group's satisfaction with the visit.

  • September 25, 1965

    National Science Committee, Briefings on Receiving Foreign Guests, No. 6

    6th report on the visit of the Atomic Energy Group of the Indonesian Economic Delegation. Describes the group's visit to China's No. 1 Institute of Atomic Energy Research. Report goes on to relate questions raised by group members about atomic energy related organizations in China, and describes the screening of a documentary on the first successful explosion of a Chinese atomic bomb.

  • December 20, 1967

    A 20 December 1967 DVO Memo about the Attitude of the Korean Leadership toward the Issues of Disarmament and Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons

    A report on the DPRK's negative attitude towards a relaxation of tensions in the international arena, based on remarks made by Kim Il Sung.

  • October 12, 1973

    Verbatim Transcript of the Third Meeting between Prime Minister Trudeau and Premier Zhou Enlai

    Zhou Enlai and Trudeau have a wideranging conversation on international politics, covering the Vietnam War, Sino-Japanese relations, Nixon's visit to China, the Arab-Israeli conflict, the Arctic circle, and nuclear energy safeguards, among other topics.

  • April 04, 1984

    Memorandum, Minister Saraiva Guerreiro, Information for the President of Brazil, 'Brazil-PRC. Nuclear Energy'

    Memo from Foreign Minister Saraiva Guerreiro to President João Batista Figueiredo on the current state of, and potential for the future of nuclear cooperation with China, in the follow-up to the presidential visit to Beijing. Guerreiro recalls that, since China was also not a party to the NPT, nuclear cooperation and purchase of material, like the uranium acquired in 1982, would not be subjected to full-scope safeguards, preserving the “sovereignty of Brazil’s nuclear program.” Guerreiro mentions a study by the National Security Council, the Nuclear Commission, Nuclebrás and the Foreign Ministry on the commercial and technological potential for an agreement with China, similar to the ones that Brazil had already signed with “other developing countries, namely those that are not members of the NPT.” One such agreement, Guerreiro suggests, could be signed during President Figueiredo’s upcoming visit to Beijing.

  • October 24, 1985

    Telegram, Argentine Embassy in Brasilia, Brazil and China Deny Charges of Nuclear Proliferation

    Telegram from the Argentine Embassy in Brasilia reports on US Senator Alan Cranston’s claim that China was proliferating nuclear technology to countries like Argentina, Brazil, Iran, Pakistan, and South Africa. The telegram reports that both Brazil’s Foreign Ministry and China’s Embassy in Brasilia denied the charges. Part of the telegram is hand-highlighted , where a Brazilian diplomat says that the only deal between China and Brazil was the one signed by President Figueiredo during his visit to Beijing in 1984.