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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • April 06, 1945

    Record of Conversation Between V. M. Molotov and Minister of Foreign Affairs of Yugoslavia I. Ivan Šubašić

    Molotov and Ivan Šubašić discuss Yugoslavia's economic cooperation with the Allied Powers and its territorial problems.

  • October 08, 1956

    Note from N. Khrushchev to the CPSU CC Presidium regarding conversations with Yugoslav leaders in Yugoslavia

    Khrushchev describes his conversations with Josip Broz Tito during his visit to Yugoslavia. They discussed the issues of U.S. aid to Yugoslavia, the Turkish and Greek conflict over Cyprus, the expansion of contact between Soviet and Yugoslav workers and the path to socialism. Tito appeared uneasy and was dissatisfied with relations between the Soviet Union and Yugoslavia.

  • January 04, 1960

    Department of State Burea of Intelligence and Research, Intelligence Information Brief No. 236, 'Yugoslavia Nuclear Reactor Goes into Operation'

    This report gives an overview of Yugoslavia’s nuclear program and its tight links with both East and West in terms of financial aid and training programs

  • October 29, 1960

    Information on the VIII Congress of National Socialist Party of Cuba

    In a secret supplement to information from the VIII Congress of the People's Socialist Party, Bulgarian delegates Abramov and Tellalov summarize answers that Blas Roca, the Cuban delegation head, provided the congress. Roca claimed that socialism is the end goal of the revolution, but it is not publicly discussed. He explained the Communist party's involvement in the revolution and July 26th Movement. Abramov and Tellalov also describe the reestablishment of relations and disagreements between Cuba and Yugoslavia, including discussions about weapons. Fidel Castro met with socialist country representatives and described Cuba's plans to nationalize enterprises, particularly American. During the congress Castro described the evolution of the July 26th Movement and the consolidation of Communism in Cuba. Abramov and Tellalov endorse Castro's leadership and review the Cuban military's strengths and weaknesses. There is a brief mention Sino-Soviet relations.

  • July 17, 1961

    Memorandum of Conversation between Jozip Broz Tito and George F. Kennan

    Kennan reports on a conversation with Tito where they discussed the upcoming Belgrade Conference of Non-Aligned States.

  • October 24, 1962

    Telegram from Yugoslav Embassy in Rio de Janeiro (Barišić) to Yugoslav Foreign Ministry

    A telegram from the Yugoslav Embassy in Rio de Janeiro to the Yugoslav Foreign Ministry discussing the Cuban Missile Crisis and U.S.-USSR-Cuban relations. It says, the "American arguments in favor of the military blockade of Cuba are: firstly, they have solid proof that Cuba will get atomic weapons; secondly, Kennedy must take more severe measures because of the internal pressure, that’s why his option is blockade, although he is trying to transfer this issue to the UNO [United Nations Organization] in order to alleviate the pressure on himself; thirdly, transferring Cuba’s issue to the UNO he is creating a precedent against unilateral USSR actions in Berlin."

  • October 25, 1962

    Telegram from Yugoslav Embassy in Rio de Janeiro (Barišić) to Yugoslav Foreign Ministry

    A telegram from the Yugoslav Embassy in Rio de Janeiro to the Yugoslav Foreign Ministry about meeting with Brazilian officials to discuss the US preparing a military invasion of Cuba.

  • October 25, 1962

    Telegram from Yugoslav Embassy in Havana (Vidaković) to Yugoslav Foreign Ministry

    A telegram from Yugoslav Embassy in Havana to the Yugoslav Foreign Ministry describing Vidaković's meeting with Brazilian Ambassador Pinto. They mostly discussed the Cuban crisis in relation to decisions made in the Organization of American States (OAS) councils.

  • October 26, 1962

    Telegram from Yugoslav Embassy in Rio de Jeneiro (Barišić) to Yugoslav Foreign Ministry

    Yugoslav Foreign Minister Koča Popović talks with Brazilian Foreign Ministry official Carlos A. Bernardes about the situation of the Cuban Missile Crisis. They are afraid that euphoria could make the US intensify a conflict that could lead to invasion, because the US ambassador [Lincoln Gordon] claims constantly that the solution to this crisis is not only disarmament of Cuba, but also liquidation of Fidel’s regime.

  • October 28, 1962

    Telegram from Yugoslav Embassy in Rio (Barišić) to Yugoslav Foreign Ministry

    Barišić is forwarding a message from Brazilian President João Goulart to Yugoslavian President Tito. The body of the message contains his thoughts on both Brazil and Yugoslavia's involvement in the Cuban Missile Crisis and also his hopes that negotiations can reach a settlement that will both retain Cuba's right to self-determination and also proceed with the denuclearization efforts of Latin America.

  • October 31, 1962

    Telegram from Yugoslav Embassy in Mexico (Vlahov) to Yugoslav Foreign Ministry

    Yugoslav officials remark that significant publicity and acknowledgment was given to Tito’s message and initiative in regard to Brazilian President João Goulart’s messages, and Yugoslavia's activity in the UNO [United Nations Organization] has solidified their reputation as that of the nonaligned.

  • October 31, 1962

    Telegram from Yugoslav Embassy in Havana (Vidaković) to Yugoslav Foreign Ministry

    The Yugoslav Embassy in Havana and Ambassador Vidakovic tell the Foreign Ministry that Yugoslavia has been mentioned in Cuban press articles for their involvement in the Cuban Missile Crisis. He also discusses other popular headlines about the crisis situation.

  • November 08, 1962

    Telegram from Yugoslav Embassy in Havana (Vidaković) to Yugoslav Foreign Ministry

    Yugoslav Foreign Minister Koca Popovic speaks with Ernesto “Che” Guevara about the Cuban Missile Crisis - the U.S. blockade, the fighting determination of the Cubans, the American imperium, and Latin American governments.

  • November 02, 1963

    Telegram from Ambassador J.N. Khosla, 'Proposed Non-Aligned Conference' and 'Tito’s Tour of the Americas (Continued)'

    Yugoslavia accepted a proposal for a second non-alignment conference, but was "not to keen" on it. Further details of Tito's tours through Bolivia, Mexico and the United States.

  • December 02, 1963

    Telegram from Ambassador J.N. Khosla, 'President Kennedy’s Assassination'

    Reaction to President Kennedy's assassination in Belgrade.

  • July 18, 1964

    Report on the relations of the SFRY – USA and the conclusions of the Federal Executive Council

    The document assembles the results of two meetings in July 1964 on the relations between the SFRY and the USA. The assessment of a stagnation in the relations at the meeting with the president of the Federal Executive Council on July 3, is followed by the resolution to intensify contacts and bilateral relations in order to maintain Yugoslavia's prestige among the socialist countries. The meeting on July 6, solidifies the plans. The sixteen recommendations resulting from it relate to mutual visits of government officials, the settlement of open economic negotiations, an intensified international engagement, and the stronger presence of Yugoslav decision makers in the US press.

  • September 05, 1967

    Report on the conversation between Marko Nikezic and Dean Rusk at the State Department.

    Memorandum of conversation between Yugoslav Foreign Minister Marko Nikezic and Secretary of State Dean Rusk at the State Department. The discussion is a continuation of earlier talks between U.S. president Lyndon B. Johnson and Yugoslav president Josef Tito. Rusk and Nikezic clarify the mutual positions of their countries on the crisis in the Middle East resulting from the recent Six-Day War. They also touch upon U.S.-Cuban relations, political developments in China, and tensions between the U.S. and the Soviet Union over plans for anti-missile systems.

  • April 13, 1970

    Report on Yugoslav-American relations fourteen months after President Richard Nixon's assumption of office.

    Report on Yugoslav-American relations written by a Yugoslav official representing the SFRY in Washington, D.C. Fourteen months after the beginning of President Richard Nixon's term in office the memorandum sums up general tendencies in U.S. politics in regard to Yugoslavia. Among the topics discussed are a general improvement of the relations in the economic, scientific, technical and cultural sectors as well as the SFRY's poltical position between the aligned countries.

  • September 30, 1970

    Report on the Conversation Between Yugoslav President Josip Tito and US President Richard Nixon in Belgrade.

    Report on the conversation between Yugoslav president Josip Tito and U.S. president Richard Nixon in Belgrade. The exchange centers on the crisis in the Middle East and potential political scenarios in the aftermath of President Gamal Abdel Nasser's death. Nixon also raises the topic of U.S. policies in Africa and its reception among the African countries.

  • October 05, 1970

    Report on the talk between Henry Kissinger and Mirko Tepavac held on an airplane en route from Zagreb.

    Report on the conversation between Henry Kissinger, Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs, United States, and Mirko Tepavac, Federal Secretary for Foreign Affairs, SFRY. Topics of the conversation, held on an airplane en route from Zagreb, include U.S. development policies in Africa, the war in Vietnam, the crisis in the Middle East, and the Yugoslav position in Soviet-U.S. relations.