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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • November 09, 1944

    Letter No. 402 from L.D. Wilgress, Canadian Embassy, Moscow, to the Secretary of State for External Affairs, W.L. Mackenzie King

    The Canadian Ambassador to the Soviet Union, L.D. Wilgress, thoroughly reviews Soviet foreign policy in Europe, Asia, and in Latin America and its relations with the United States and the United Kingdom. Wilgress optimistically concludes that "the Soviet Government are desirous of co-operating fully with the other great powers."

  • November 19, 1944

    Record of the Conversation of Comrade I.V. Stalin with the General Secretary of the CC French Communist Party, Comrade Thorez

    French communist Comrade Thorez and Stalin discuss the situation of the Communist Party in France.

  • December 02, 1944

    Account of General de Gaulle's Meeting with Marshal Stalin Saturday, 2 December at 21:00 at the Kremlin

    Stalin and de Gaulle discuss General de Gaulle's recent trip to Baku, the need to establish a strong France and Russia in the new European order, and Germany's future western border with France. The leaders discuss a 20-year treaty of alliance between the two nations.

  • December 06, 1944

    Conversation between General de Gaulle and Marshal Stalin at the Kremlin 6 December 1944 from 18:00 to 19:45

    General de Gaulle and Marshal Stalin discuss the historical affinity between France and Poland, France's aim to support a Poland that can stand up to Germany in the future, France's support of the Curzon line as well as it insistence that Poland should remain an independent state. Stalin and de Gaulle discuss the concept of a "western bloc" of European nations, de Gaulle assures Stalin he has no aims to create such an alliance. De Gaulle reaffirms France's support for Poland as well as the need for friendship between France, Poland, and the USSR. They discuss the creation of a new league of nations.

  • December 08, 1944

    Conversation between General de Gaulle and Marshal Stalin Friday 8 December 1944

    General de Gaulle discusses France's positions on the German question in terms of Germany's borders, disarmament, and alliances. De Gaulle insists that Germany's Western border should not extend past the Rhine and that the country should be disarmed militarily, economically, and morally. He argues that international alliances between the USSR and France should be multilayered, and should include some involvement United States. Stalin argues for the benefit of a tripartite pact between the USSR, France, and England. Stalin then describes a pact between the USSR and France to bolster Poland.

  • October 23, 1945

    TASS Digest Distributed to Cde. I.V. Stalin et al, 'Report of a TASS Correspondent in France'

    Report that the French press has been instructed by the Ministry of Information not to spread any information of foreign policy favorable to the USSR.

  • March 25, 1953

    Ciphered Telegram from Molotov with a Message to Kim Il Sung

    Telegram informing Kim Il Sung that the French government contacted the Soviet government and asked for help in facilitating the release of 14 French citizens (specified) from the DPRK authorities, and to give an exact idea of the fates of those citizens (specified) on which the French authorities have received no information since the beginning of the war in Korea.

  • March 19, 1955

    Telegram to V. M. Molotov on Report of the Agency France Press

    Telegram from V. Kuznetsov about the French Minister of Foreign Affairs Piné's statement that a conference of the three powers has been called to discuss problems of Indo-China and implementation of Geneva accords. The telegram concludes that a meeting is needed with Piné to demonstrate that the Soviet Union is firmly monitoring any Geneva accord violations.

  • October 28, 1969

    Telegram Number 2142-08, 'Conversation with the Deputy-Minister of Foreign Affairs (Europe)'

    Luo Guibo is curious about developments in West German-Soviet relations and the Conference on European Security, while Etienne Manac’h inquires about China's appointment of ambassadors to Europe.

  • June 26, 1970

    Hungarian Foreign Ministry memorandum on Soviet Ambassador Titov’s briefing on Soviet foreign policy

    This memorandum gives Soviet Ambassador Titov's report that during Gromiko's visit to France, the French seemed eager to continue to build relations with the USSR. It also reports on the reception of the Rogers Plan, an American plan to bring peace to the Middle East, by the Arab states.

  • August 13, 1971

    Cable from Ambassador Rush to Kissinger Regarding Four Powers Negotiations on Berlin

    US Ambassador Rush informs Kissinger on the progress of negotiations between the Soviet Union, France, Great Britain, and the United States on the status of Berlin. He reports that negotiations have gone well, aside from difficulties with the British and French ambassadors.

  • July 05, 1989

    Excerpts from the Conversation of M.S. Gorbachev and Francois Mitterrand

    Excerpts from a dinner conversation between Gorbachev and Mitterrand where they discuss the political situations in Romania, Bulgaria, and Poland, and also comment on the US political system.

  • October 29, 1990

    Record of a Conversation Between M. S. Gorbachev and President of France, F. Mitterrand

    Record of conversation between Mikhail Gorbachev and Francois Mitterrand, on the subject of Saddam Hussein and his invasion of Kuwait. Both leaders stress the importance of avoiding military conflict and the necessity of a united front for the permanent members of the UN Security Council in order to achieve this. Mitterrand notes his apprehension over the US perception of UN Charter Article 51 and the possibility US initiation of hostilities.

  • June, 2007

    The USSR-France Society. Folder 71. The Chekist Anthology

    This note describes the relations between the U.S.S.R. – France Society and the All-Union Society for Cultural Relations with Foreign Countries (SSOD). According to Mitrokhin, SSOD was founded in 1958 as a public organization for intellectuals interested in Soviet studies. However, the U.S.S.R. – France Society served as a cover institution for KGB agents. Although the multi-national organization was a threat to leaks of confidential information, undercover agents used the relations between the two organizations to establish connections with diplomats, the heads of influential clubs, journalists, and scientists. It was convenient for KGB agents to organize events to promote political goals. Because of the relations developed as a result of these activities, the KGB residency prevented a number of anti-socialist decisions.