Search in
ADD SEARCH FILTER CANCEL SEARCH FILTER

Digital Archive International History Declassified

SEARCH RESULTS

  • December 15, 1947

    Explanation of the Dissolution of the Indochinese Communist Party in 1945

    List of reasons for the dissolution of the Indochinese Communist Party by the Viet Minh in 1945. The list was provided by Pham Ngoc Thach while meeting with the Soviet Envoy in Switzerland A. G. Kulazhenkov in September 1947.

  • March 06, 1954

    Cable from Zhang Wentian, 'Reporting the Preliminary Opinions of Our Side on the Geneva Conference to the Soviet Side'

    Zhang Wentian discusses his visit with Molotov. During this meeting, Molotov says delegations from China, Korea, and Vietnam are welcome to Moscow before the Geneva conference to discuss its proceedings. Molotov also mentions several issues that still need to be discussed, such as relaxing tensions in Asia, Korean unification, ministers in attendance at the conference, and India's participation in the Indochina discussion.

  • May 01, 1954

    Cable from Zhou Enlai, 'Regarding a Meeting with British Foreign Secretary Eden'

    Zhou Enlai, Molotov, and Eden discuss the Korea issue, the Indochina issue, Sino-British relations, British-American relations, and the issue of five powers.

  • October 21, 1954

    Talking Points from Premier Zhou Enlai’s Third Meeting with Nehru

    Zhou Enlai and Nehru discuss Sino-Indian relations, as well as China and India's views toward Thailand, Indonesia, Korea, Vietnam, and Ceylon (Sri Lanka).

  • May 18, 1955

    Draft Telegram to Hanoi Soviet Ambassador on Instructions for Meeting with Ho Chi Minh

    Telegram to the Soviet Ambassador in Hanoi with instructions to meet with Ho Chi Minh about discussion between Yudin and Bibrovski. The Ambassador is to discuss the situation in South Vietnam and to ask if assistance is required.

  • May 19, 1955

    Molotov to CC CPSU on United States and French Relations in South Vietnam

    V. Molotov reports to CC CPSU on American undermining of France in Vietnam. He believes that the situation should be used to promote unification and that American policies are not properly exposed.

  • May 25, 1956

    Telegram on Record of April 1956 Conversation with Nguen Zui Chin

    Record of Nguen Zui Chin's discussion with USSR Ambassador M. V. Zimyanin and Sokolov about the meeting of the IXth CC PTV Plenum, whose goal was to review resolutions of the USSR XXth CPSU Congress. The Plenum discussed a range of topics including American involvement in South Vietnam, the cult of personality and propaganda, foreign policy, the sixth five-year plan of the USSR, economic and cultural development, strengthening the Party, peoples' assemblies, and Party leadership. Chin also detailed streamlining party organizations.

  • August 01, 1957

    CDS Report No. 50 from Choi Duk Shin to the President (Syngman Rhee)

    Choi Duk Shin outlines his discussions with dignitaries on the topics of Vietnamese military training and Japanese economic relations, discusses recent Vietnamese affairs, and reports on the Cambodia and Laos crises.

  • April 14, 1958

    Record of Conversation with DRV Ministry of State Security Official Tkhum

    Tkhum informed Kadymov that the Ministry of State Security held deliberations where the question of Vietnamese unification sparked a debate on whether or not the country could be reunited through peaceful means. Many Southerners employed at Democratic Republic of Vietnam agencies believe that only armed means will achieve results.

  • January 21, 1963

    Galbraith’s Journal Entry Account of the Conversation with Rapacki and Michałowski in New Delhi

    Record of conversation between John Kenneth Galbraith and Polish officials Jerzy Michałowski and Adam Rapacki. The Polish officials note that the American campaign is encouraging the North Vietnamese to look to the Chinese for help. Galbraith calls for a six month ceasefire as a sign of good faith.

  • January 31, 1963

    Secret Telegram from Rapacki (Warsaw) to Jaszczuk (Moscow)

    Cable from Adam Rapacki to the Polish representative in Moscow informing him of Jerzy Michałowski’s coming arrival in Moscow, in light of recent Soviet-US and Polish-US talks on South Vietnam.

  • February, 1963

    Soviet Memorandum on the Polish Peace Initiative on Vietnam

    Soviet memorandum on the meeting between US Ambassador John Kenneth Galbraith and Polish officials Michalowski and Rapacki. Describes the meeting as a sign of US weariness of involvement in Southeast Asia. Asserts that a neutralized Vietnam could be useful to the socialist countries as well.

  • April 08, 1965

    The Four-Point Position of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam Regarding a Political Solution of the Vietnam Question

    Vietnamese Prime Minister Pham Van Dong's report at the Congress of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam clarifies the DRV's 4-point position toward a political solution of the Vietnam question in the spirit of the Geneva Accords: The US had to withdraw all military personnel and destroy their bases in Vietnam. Before a peaceful reunification, the North and the South refrained from having military alliance with other countries and foreign armies and bases in their territories. South Vietnam's internal matters would be dealt with without foreign intervention and the reunification issue would be discussed between the Vietnamese.

  • May 26, 1967

    Letter, US Senator Vance Hartke to UN Secretary-General U Thant

    U.S. Senator Vance Hartke inquires about the pending applications of North Vietnam and South Vietnam and North Korea and South Korea to gain entry into the United Nations, as well as the procedures involved for the dual admission of these divided nations.

  • November 03, 1968

    The National Liberation Front's Five-Point Political Solution to the South Vietnam Question

    Excerpt from a declaration of the National Liberation Front on a political settlement of the South Vietnam question: The US had to withdraw from Vietnam and destroy their military bases in South Vietnam. South Vietnam's internal matters would be dealt with by the South Vietnamese and the reunification of Vietnam would be decided by the Vietnamese without foreign intervention. There would be a general election in South Vietnam. The new government in South Vietnam would adopt a neutral foreign policy: No military alliance, having cordial relation with all countries, establishing good neighbor relations with Cambodia and Laos.

  • May 08, 1969

    The Complete Ten-Point Solution of the National Liberation Front Regarding a Political Solution to the South Vietnam Question

    Announcement of the National Liberation Front's delegate at the 16th session of the Paris Conference: The Americans had to unconditionally withdraw their amy, military personnel, weapons, etc. and destroy their bases in Vietnam. The South Vietnamese would choose their political system through a general election without foreign intervention. In the meantime, a provisional government including members of all political groups would be formed. The North and the South would then reestablish normal relations and negotiate reunification peacefully without foreign intervention. Both would refrain from having military alliances and foreign military presence in their territories. The North and the South would discuss the release of POWs. The Americans would have to bear all responsibilities for the damage incurred in Vietnam during the war.

  • June 10, 1969

    The Action Agenda of the Provisional Revolutionary Government of the Republic of South Vietnam

    The Twelve-Point Action Agenda of the Provisional Revolutionary Government of the Republic of South Vietnam. The points include continuing the war against the Americans and forcing the US to withdraw from Vietnam, eliminating the government of South Vietnam, creating an inclusive provisional government with the participation of other political groups, guaranteeing human rights and equality, improving workers' lives, guaranteeing the rights of students, intellectuals, businesses, increasing production, improving cultural life and education, granting amnesty for people working for the former regime, alleviating the consequences of war, reestablishing normal relations with the North, negotiating reunification peacefully, establishing diplomatic relations with all countries, refraining from having military alliances, supporting the independence movement in Asia, Africa and Latin America.

  • September 17, 1970

    Eight Points of Clarification to the Ten-point Solution of the Provisional Revolutionary Government of the Republic of South Vietnam

    Eight points of clarification put forward by the Provisional Revolutionary Government of the Republic of South Vietnam in the 84th session of the Paris Conference: The US had to withdraw unconditionally from Vietnam. If the US withdew by June 30, 1971, the revolutionary forces would not attack American and Allies' forces and negotiations on guaranteeing safety for the withdrawing forces and the release of POWs would be commenced immediately. The Provisional Revolutionary Government would talk to a new government without Thieu-Ky-Khiem (the three leaders of the government of South Vietnam) about a political solution in South Vietnam. The people of South Vietnam would choose their political regime through a general election without foreign intervention. The South and the North would then reestablish normal relations and negotiate reunification peacefully.

  • June 25, 1971

    Minutes of the Romanian Politburo Meeting Concerning Nicolae Ceauşescu's Visit to China, North Korea, Mongolia, and Vietnam

    These are the minutes of a meeting of the Central Committee of the Romanian Communist Party discussing Romanian leader Nicolae Ceauşescu's 1971 visit to China. Ceauşescu reports on his visits to Chinese enterprises, universities, and laboratories, and acknowledges the achievements of the Cultural Revolution. The report on China is followed by comments on his subsequent visits to North Korea, Vietnam, and Mongolia. Finally, the discussion turns to Moscow's criticism of Ceauşescu's anti-Soviet statements during his stay in the Middle East.

  • July 01, 1971

    A Seven-Point Declaration of the Provisional Revolutionary Government of South Vietnam

    Statement by the Provisional Revolutionary Government of the Republic of South Vietnam at the 119th session of the Paris Conference: The US had to set a specific date for troop withdrawal from Vietnam. If the US planned to finish complete withdrawal within 1971, troop withdrawal and the release of POWs would be started and ended on the same dates. The Americans had to stop supporting the Thieu administration. A new government would be formed which supported peace, independence, neutrality and democracy. The Provisional Revolutionary Government would talk to this new government about creating a National Conciliatory Government to carry out a general election. The North and the South would then peacefully negotiate reunification. South Vietnam would be neutral and establish relations with all countries. The US would bear all responsibilities for damages incurred in Vietnam.