Search in
ADD SEARCH FILTER CANCEL SEARCH FILTER

Digital Archive International History Declassified

SEARCH RESULTS

  • February 02, 1944

    Memorandum of Conversation Held in the Kremlin, February 2, 1944, at 6 p.m.

    W. Averell Harriman and Joseph Stalin discuss the United States using Soviet Air Bases on the Pacific coast and the Soviets entering the Pacific fight.

  • November 01, 1945

    From the Journal of V.M. Molotov, 'The Reception of US Ambassador Harriman, 1 November 1945 at 1930'

    Notes on a 1945 conversation between Soviet Minister of Foreign Affairs V. M. Molotov and United States Ambassador to the Soviet Union W. Averell Harriman on the American-led Far East Commission and Military Council in Japan.

  • November 03, 1945

    Cable, V. Molotov, L. Beria, G. Malenkov, and A. Mikoyan to Cde. Stalin

    Draft of reply to United States Ambassador to the Soviet Union W. Averell Harriman containing Soviet proposals for structural and procedural changes to the Allied Military Council in Japan, submitted for Stalin's approval.

  • November 03, 1945

    From the Journal of V.M. Molotov, 'The Reception of US Ambassador Harriman at 2330 3 November 1945'

    Responding to questions posed by Soviet Minister of Foreign Affairs V. M. Molotov at an earlier meeting, American Ambassador W. Averell Harriman attempts to explain several finer points on the structure and function of the Far East Commission and Allied Military Council in Japan.

  • November 04, 1945

    Cable, V. Molotov, L. Beria, G. Malenkov, and A. Mikoyan to Cde. Stalin

    Soviet changes to American proposals for the control mechanism and Far East Commission in Japan, drafted in response to objections Stalin raised in a telegram on November 4, 1945.

  • November 05, 1945

    From the Journal of V.M. Molotov, 'The Reception of US Ambassador Harriman, 5 November 1945 at 1900'

    Soviet Minister of Foreign Affairs V. M. Molotov and American Ambassador to the Soviet Union W. Averell Harriman discuss proposed Soviet changes to the control mechanism and Far East Commission in Japan.

  • November 12, 1945

    Memorandum Presented to Mr. Harriman by V. M. Molotov on 12 November 1945

    This Soviet reply to the American government attempts to lay out Soviet changes to American proposals for a control mechanism and Far East Commission in Japan and provides justification for those changes.

  • November 12, 1945

    From the Journal of V.M. Molotov, 'The Reception of US Ambassador Harriman at 1900 12 November 1945'

    Molotov and Harriman argue, respectively, for the Soviet and American proposals for a control mechanism and Far East Commission in Japan, failing to iron out differences between the two proposals.

  • November 19, 1945

    Memorandum Presented to V.M. Molotov by US Ambassador Mr. Harriman on 19 November 1945

    The Government of the United States agrees to several of the suggested Soviet changes to the American proposals for a control mechanism in Japan.

  • November 19, 1945

    Memorandum Presented to V.M. Molotov by US Ambassador Mr. Harriman on 19 November 1945

    The Government of the United States agrees to two of the suggested Soviet changes to the American proposals for the Far East Commission for Japan.

  • November 19, 1945

    Verbal Statement presented to V.M. Molotov by US Ambassador Mr. Harriman on 19 November 1945

    American Ambassador Harriman further clarifies the Government of the United States' position on the Far East Commission, the Allied Council for Japan, and the role of Supreme Commander General MacArthur.

  • November 19, 1945

    From the Journal of V.M. Molotov, 'The Reception of US Ambassador Harriman, 19 November 1945'

    Soviet Minister of Foreign Affairs V. M. Molotov and American Ambassador to the Soviet Union W. Averell Harriman continue their negotiations over the American proposals for the control mechanism and Far East Commission in Japan. Harriman introduces the possibility of Soviet troops taking part in the occupation under American Supreme Commander General MacArthur.

  • February 21, 1952

    Ciphered Telegram No. 16715 from Beijing, Mao Zedong to Filippov [Stalin]

    Mao Zedong requests help from Stalin regarding the dropping of insects on North Korea by the United States.

  • August 28, 1952

    Cable, Zhou Enlai to Chairman Mao [Zedong] and the Central Committee

    Zhou reports on the latest negotiations with the Soviet Union concerning the Changchun Railway, the Lüshun Port, and a rubber agreement. Zhou and Molotov also discussed the possibility of signing peace treaties with Japan.

  • March 04, 1954

    Letter, President Syngman Rhee to General Van Fleet

    President Rhee once again suggests that the US government should increase the ROK defense forces. It will not only be cheaper to fund Korean (over American) divisions, it also means that Americans do not need to fight in Korea. Rhee then negotiates that if the US government implements the necessary military buildup aid, he too will not take any “unilateral action” for or against the future Geneva Conference until after it has been in session. Finally, Rhee advocates his disapproval of US interest to build up Japan.

  • November 06, 1954

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, ‘Premier Zhou’s Talk with Members of Japan’s Diet’

    Zhou Enlai and Japanese Diet Members discuss Japan's relationship with the United States, the overall trends in Sino-Japanese relations, and some specific issues in Sino-Japanese relations, such as war criminals, fisheries, and communications.

  • 1955

    Information on Japan’s Participation in the Asian-African Conference

    A Chinese report on Japan's participation before the Asian-African Conference. The report observes that the Japanese public paid more attention to this conference than to the previous Bangkok conference and highlighted Tokyo's desire to cooperate with China.

  • October 05, 1955

    Letter, Yong Shik Kim to Office of the President (Syngman Rhee)

    Report on Congressman Hayworth's visit to Korea on Oct. 9, with plan for a luncheon with Hayworth

  • October 12, 1955

    Letter, Kim Yong-shik of the Korean Mission in Japan to President Syngman Rhee

    Information from Minister Lee in London on recent Japanese foreign affair policies

  • October 20, 1955

    Record of Conversation from Premier Zhou’s Reception of the Japanese Parliamentary Delegation in China and the Japanese Academic and Cultural Delegation in China

    Zhou Enlai and a group of Japanese officials and academics discuss the wartime history and present status of Japan-China relations. They also touch on US-Japan relations and economic conditions in China and Japan.