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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • September 04, 1930

    Imre Nagy’s OGPU (Unified State Political Directorate) Enlistment

    Certificate signed by Imre Nagy upon enlistment in the OGPU secret police (later the NKVD).

  • March 10, 1938

    Report on Imre Nagy’s Arrest by the NKVD (Commissariat of Internal Affairs)

    Matusov and Altman report on Nagy's arrest on 4/5 March 1938 and subsequent release on 8 March, and describe some of his work.

  • June, 1941

    Report from the People’s Committee of Internal Affairs to the Central Committee of the Hungarian Communist Party, about Agent 'Volodya' (Imre Nagy)

    Sverdlov provides a brief overview of agent "Volodya" (Imre Nagy) and his work.

  • November 09, 1944

    Letter No. 402 from L.D. Wilgress, Canadian Embassy, Moscow, to the Secretary of State for External Affairs, W.L. Mackenzie King

    The Canadian Ambassador to the Soviet Union, L.D. Wilgress, thoroughly reviews Soviet foreign policy in Europe, Asia, and in Latin America and its relations with the United States and the United Kingdom. Wilgress optimistically concludes that "the Soviet Government are desirous of co-operating fully with the other great powers."

  • January 09, 1945

    From the Diary of V. A. Zorin: Record of Conversation with Z. Firlinger on the Question of Preparing for the Armistice Negotiations with Hungary

    Soviet Ambassador Zorin and Czech official Firlinger go over the details of the draft armistice agreement with Hungary.

  • April 10, 1946

    Record of Conversation between I. V. Stalin and the Hungarian Governmental Delegation

    Stalin and the Hungarian delegation discuss economic issues, and the situation of Hungarians in Slovakia.

  • February 17, 1948

    Record of Conversation between I.V. Stalin and President of Hungary Zoltán Tildy in Moscow

    Stalin and Hungarian President Zoltán Tildy discuss the draft of the treaty of friendship, cooperation and mutual assistance between Hungary and the Soviet Union. They also discuss Hungarian relations with its neighbors, Romania and Czechoslovakia, and the internal situation in Hungary.

  • June 13, 1953

    Transcript of Conversation between the Soviet Leadership and Hungarian Workers’ Party Delegation in Moscow

    Discussion of the reorganization of the Hungarian government and various reforms following Stalin's death.

  • July 16, 1953

    Transcript of the Conversation between the Soviet Leadership and the Hungarian Workers' Party Delegation in Moscow

    Discussion of the reorganization of the Hungarian government and various reforms following Stalin's death.

  • September 10, 1956

    Report, Embassy of Hungary in North Korea to Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    Report from Ambassador Károly Práth to Budapest on the unusual circumstances in the run-up to and during his first meeting with Kim Il Sung.

  • October 24, 1956

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Hungary, ‘Summary of the Counterrevolutionary Rebellion taking place in the Hungarian Capital’

    The Chinese Embassy in Hungary provides an update on developments in the Hungarian "counterrevolutionary rebellion."

  • October 25, 1956

    Policy Considerations for Radio Free Europe Broadcasts

    A CIA/International Operations Division official recommends policies to guide RFE broadcasting to Hungary during the revolution.

  • October 26, 1956

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Hungary, ‘The Situation in the Hungarian capital following the Outbreak of the Counterrevolutionary Rebellion’

    The Chinese Embassy in Budapest reports that the "counterrevolutionary rebellion in the Hungarian capital became increasingly serious after midnight last night"

  • November 02, 1956

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Hungary, ‘The Hungarian Paper Justice Incorrectly Interpreted Our Statement’

    The Chinese Embassy in Budapest reports that the "counterrevolutionaries intentionally misinterpreted" China's stance on the events in Hungary

  • November 02, 1956

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, ‘On Our Attitude towards Hungary’

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry says that "'much listening, little speaking' is necessary” with regards to the Hungarian Revolution.

  • November 02, 1956

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Hungary, ‘On the Meeting between Imre Nagy and Ambassador Hao Deqing’

    The Chinese Embassy in Hungary provides a lengthy report on the talks between Imre Nagy and Hao Deqing.

  • December 17, 1956

    Diary of Soviet Official K. A. Krutikov, Record of Conversation with Hungarian Envoy Ezhef Sall

    Conversation about the mood among the foreign Hungarian colony in PRC. The most of the conversation concerns the reasons for the 1956 uprising in Hungary. A lack of knowledge among the Hungarian leadership (with a predominant Soviet background) about the actual situation in Hungary, and the failure of the Soviet Embassy in Budapest to establish contacts with non-Russian speaking Hungarians, are here presented as main reasons for the Hungarian uprising.

  • December 26, 1956

    Memorandum of Meeting with Khrushchev, Moscow

    After lightly rebuking Hoxha's choices to use public trials for the executions of political criminals, Khrushchev reassures Hoxha of the Soviet Union's support for Albania, and concludes with a summary of the Soviet Union's current standing in the international sphere.

  • January 28, 1957

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Hungary, ‘Chinese Embassy to Hungary’s 1956 Annual Summary and the Submission of the 1957 Work Plan’ (Excerpt)

    The Chinese Embassy in Budapest describes some of the problems which occurred as the Embassy attempted to follow and react to the 1956 Hungarian Revolution.

  • April 17, 1957

    Journal of Soviet Ambassador to the DPRK A.M. Puzanov for 17 April 1957

    Kim Il Sung and the Soviet Union trade delegation discuss the DPRK's economic conditions and terms for trade between the Soviet Union and North Korea. Afterwards, Nam Il gives Puzanov an overview of discrepancies in the North Korean and Polish delegations' draft communiques.