Search in
ADD SEARCH FILTER CANCEL SEARCH FILTER

Digital Archive International History Declassified

SEARCH RESULTS

  • February 09, 1946

    Speech Delivered by Stalin at a Meeting of Voters of the Stalin Electoral District, Moscow

    English translation of Stalin's 1946 "election" speech.

  • February 22, 1946

    George Kennan's 'Long Telegram'

    Ambassador George F. Kennan writes to the Secretary of State with a lengthy analysis of Soviet policy in an attempt to explain their recent uncooperative behavior. This message would later become famous as the "long telegram."

  • March 05, 1946

    Churchhill's "Iron Curtain" Speech, "Sinews of Peace"

    Text of speech given by Churchill at Westminster College in Fulton, Missouri in which he first used the phrase "iron curtain."

  • September 17, 1946

    Answers to the Questions Posed by A. Werth, Moscow Correspondent for the Sunday Times

    In an interview for the Sunday Times, Stalin discusses his thoughts on foreign policy developments around the world.

  • August 03, 1949

    Untitled report on Soviet interests in the Middle East

    The Russian Commission is showing interest in the Middle East, especially in Turkish-Syrian collaboration and American and British support for a Turkish fight against communism.

  • August 08, 1949

    Untitled report on a meeting of Communist parties

    A meeting of Communist Parties endorses future activities and plans to counter Turkish, Syrian, and other regional anti-communist plans.

  • 1951

    Networks Acting for the Russians

    The locations of Russian centers and agents conducting popular activities and their strategies for propaganda. The iems the Russian Commission is tracking are also broached, including military munition in Beirut and the Syrian Republic.

  • 1955

    Untitled report on a visit to the Communist Bloc

    Extensive account of Cheab's visit to Budapest, Kiev, Moscow, Leningrad, Georgia, Bucharest, Sofia, and Plovdiv.

  • February 25, 1956

    Khrushchev's Secret Speech, 'On the Cult of Personality and Its Consequences,' Delivered at the Twentieth Party Congress of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union

    In a secret speech before a closed plenum of the 20th Congress of the CPSU, Khrushchev denounced Stalin’s cult of the personality. In addition, he revealed that Stalin had rounded up thousands of people and sent them into a huge system of political work camps (Gulags). This revelation was met with astonishment by many present for the speech, but helped to break the power that Stalin still held over the country.

  • May 30, 1957

    Untitled report on developments in Syria

    The Soviets begin to build radar bases and fix anti-aircraft artillery in Syria, and the Syrian and Russian governments reach an military aid agreement.

  • May 01, 1958

    Radio Liberty Broadcasting Policy Guidelines

    Policy guidelines for Radio Liberty broadcasting approved by the Committee on Radio Broadcasting Policy.

  • May 01, 1958

    Voice of America Russian Broadcasting Guidelines

    USIA guidelines for VOA Russian broadcasting policy, endorsed by the Committee on Radio Broadcasting Policy.

  • January 05, 1959

    Moscow Dispatch No. 375, Some Considerations Regarding US Policy Toward the USSR

    Foreign Service Officer David Mark, reporting in Moscow Dispatch No. 375, suggests changes in US policy to embrace reduction of “pressure-generating activities” on Eastern Europe, including Radio Free Europe (RFE). Ambassador Llwellyn E. Thompson dissents but suggests that RFE broadcasts might be halted in exchange for an end to Soviet jamming [of Voice of America and other Western broadcasts].

  • May 13, 1959

    USIA Criticism of Radio Free Europe and Radio Liberty

    USIA Director George Allen sympathizes with State Department questioning the value of RFE and RL in a meeting with Allen Dulles and others

  • January 06, 1960

    Conversation of N. S. Khrushchev with Indian writer Kh[oja] A[hmed] Abbas, 6 January 1960

    Responding to questions about contemporary capitalist states and the transition from capitalism to socialism, Khrushchev discusses the nature of socialism, capitalism and class struggle, comparing the situation in the Soviet Union to that in the United States and Great Britain. Khrushchev discusses the progression of Marxism and his belief in the possible peaceful coexistence of capitalist and socialist countries. However, he emphasizes the spiritual and material advantages of socialism. The conversation ends with a discussion of poetry and of the scientific advances of the Soviet Union, particularly in space. Khrushchev's upcoming visit to India is mentioned.

  • April 24, 1960

    Allen Dulles Suggests Private 'Freedom Radios'

    Dulles drafts a suggestion for establishing “Freedom Radios” that would merge RFE and RL, expand broadcasts to other parts of the world, and become truly private enterprises free of CIA involvement

  • July 30, 1960

    Journal of Soviet Ambassador to the DPRK A.M. Puzanov for 30 July 1960

    Puzanov and Pak Geum-cheol exchange their opinions on the Soviet-North Korean relationship, Soviet economic aid toward North Korea, and North Korea's policies toward South Korea.

  • January 03, 1962

    Information on the Attitude of the Korean Workers’ Party to Some Decisions of the 22nd CPSU [Communist Party of the Soviet Union] Congress

    Dimo Dichev, Head of the Central Committee of the Bulgarian Communist Party's Foreign Policy and International Relations Department, reports on North Korea's responses to the 22nd Congress of the Soviet Union.

  • January 24, 1962

    Transcription of Speech by Yugoslav General Ivan Gosnjak

    This note describes a conference of important governmental leaders that gathered on Dec. 21, 1961 to hear Gosnjak speak. He spoke about the power of socialism and the importance of a united Soviet bloc against adversity.

  • April 25, 1963

    Statements of Cde. N. S. Khrushchev at a CPSU CC Presidium meeting, 25 April 1963

    Khrushchev criticizes the management of ideological work in the cultural industries: film, radio, television, publishing, and theater. He states that science and ideology should be separated into two departments. A discussion about the organization of the Ministry of Culture follows, including the need to establish greater coordination among the republics. Khrushchev criticizes the indulgence of the Writer's Union and emphasizes the need for reform. He recommends the creation of a council of representatives from all the republics to oversee ideological work.