Search in
ADD SEARCH FILTER CANCEL SEARCH FILTER

Digital Archive International History Declassified

SEARCH RESULTS

  • October 26, 1954

    Minutes of the Fourth Meeting between Premier Zhou Enlai and Nehru

    Zhou Enlai and Nehru touch on issues related to Yugoslavia, Pakistan, the Geneva Conference, and Indonesia.

  • June 30, 1955

    Conversation of Mao Zedong and the Yugoslav Ambassador V. Popovic

    Conversation between Mao Zedong and Yugoslav Ambassador Popovic. Mao explains that the delay in China's recognition of Yugoslavia was because China was waiting for Yugoslavia and the USSR to mend their relations. Emphasizes the need for Communist unity and cooperation.

  • September, 1956

    Minutes, Mao’s Conversation with a Yugoslavian Communist Union Delegation, Beijing, [undated]

    Mao apologizes to Yugoslavian Communist Union Delegation for poor relations in the past, citing pressure from Stalin and the Soviet Union as the primary reason.

  • April 11, 1958

    Cable from Qiao Xiaoguang to the Central Committee, 'Korea Has Decided Not to Send a Party Delegation to Yugoslavia'

    Qiao Guanhua reports that the Korean Workers' Party will not send a delegation the 7th Congress of the League of Communists of Yugoslavia.

  • April 17, 1958

    Record of Conversation with Member of the Standing Committee of the Politburo of the CCP CC, Deng Xiaoping

    Memorandum of Conversation between P.F. Iudin and Deng Xiaoping. Iudin and Xiaoping discussed the letter from the CC of the Union of Communists of Yugoslavia [UCY] to the CC CPSU. Deng expressed his support for the CC CPSU decisions regarding the Yugoslav affairs, showed no objections to the CC UCY's program, and favored the Yugoslavs in their development of Marxist thought.

  • April 19, 1958

    From the Diary of P. F. Yudin: Memorandum of Conversation with Mao Zedong on 5 April 1958

    Conversation between P.F. Yudin, Mao Zedong, and Zhou Enlai regarding Yugoslavia's place in the international Communist community, especially Tito's inconsistency as an ally.

  • June 27, 1960

    Memorandum of Conversation between Albanian Ambassador to the PRC Mihal Prifti and Soviet Ambassador to the PRC Stepan V. Chervonenko

    Prifti and Chervonenko discuss Chervonenko's meetings with Peng Zhen on the Sino-Indian border dispute, the decision to send a delegation to the Romanian Workers' Party Congress in Bucharest, and Peng's visit to Moscow. Prifti and Chervonenko also reviewed China's attempts to develop atomic bomb and to compete with the Soviet to be the leader of the world's workers' and communist movement, and the power struggle with the Chinese Communist Party.

  • July 23, 1963

    Analysis by the Czechoslovak Foreign Ministry of Chinese-Albanian and Chinese-Yugoslav Relations

    This document reviews relations between China and Albania during the 1960s, focusing on political and economic cooperation between the two allies. The author also discusses the relationship between China and Yugoslavia in the 1950s and 1960s. The document shows that Sino-Yugoslav relations have deteriorated due to Chinese criticism of the Albanian brand of Socialism.

  • November 12, 1963

    Memorandum of Conversation, Chinese Officials and the Hungarian Ambassador to China

    Martin, the Hungarian ambassador to China, is involved with several conversations with Chinese officials before returning to Hungary, and the three highlighted conversations are with Zhu De, Chen Yi, and Zhou Enlai. Among other international issues, Zhu De discusses imperial attempts to restore capitalism in socialist countries and references “revisionism” in Hungary, to which Martin responds defensively. Chen Yi discusses Chinese industrial and economic development. Zhou Enlai discusses recent Chinese struggles, and interprets Martin’s reaction as distrust.

  • January 11, 1964

    Telegram number 47 from Pierre Gorce

    Pierre Gorce summarizes the contents of the recent Sino-Albanian common declaration.

  • June 15, 1964

    Telegram number 306/10 from Lucien Paye

    Lucien Paye summarizes the views of the Yugoslavian chargé d’affaires in Beijing on China's policies toward Laos and other countries in Southeast Asia and Africa.

  • August 03, 1964

    Comrade Zhou Enlai, Comrade Peng Zhen Receive Tran Tu Binh, Vietnam’s Ambassador to China; Nesti Nase, Albania’s Ambassador to China; and Pak Se-chang, Korea’s Ambassador to China

    The meeting was among leaders from China, Vietnam, North Korea and Albania in 1964. They discussed Soviet-Romanian relations and plans to support Romania.

  • April 02, 1965

    Record of Conversation between Premier Zhou Enlai and the President of Pakistan Ayub Khan

    Zhou, Ayub Khan, and Zulfikar Bhutto discuss the Vietnam War, China's relations with the US and the Soviet Union, the Second Asian-African Conference, and the Non-Aligned Movement.

  • April 25, 1969

    Telegram Number 1797/1800, 'Chinese Foreign Policy'

    The French Ambassador to London reports that China is eager to open up diplomatic relations with Italy and Canada and to enter into negotiations with the United States.

  • May 16, 1969

    Note Number 399 from Pierre Cerles to Michel Debré, 'China and Eastern Europe'

    Pierre Cerles provides an assessment of Chinese foreign policy toward Eastern Europe during the 1960s within the context of the Sino-Soviet split, the Warsaw Pact invasion of Czechoslovakia, the Cultural Revolution, and China's own internal leadership divisions.

  • October 10, 1969

    Telegram Number 1930-33, 'China and the European Socialist Countries'

    Etienne Manac’h reports that although China may soon re-appoint ambassadors to Eastern Europe, officials from Poland and Czechoslovakia are skeptical of China's policies toward their countries.

  • August 04, 1971

    Minutes of the Joint Meeting of the Central Committee and the Ministers’ Council

    These notes discuss foreign policy issues related to China, Hungary, the Soviet Union, and Romania. To quote the document itself, it "was a bilateral discussion of the internal situation of fraternal Parties and countries, and later an exchange of opinion on contemporary foreign policy questions and the problems of the international workers’ movement."

  • August 13, 1971

    Memorandum of Conversation between Ambassador Micunovic and Secretary Brezhnev held on August 10, 1971

    Veljko Mićunović reports on a heated conversation with Leonid Brezhnev about Soviet-Yugoslav relations.

  • March 10, 1980

    Evaluation of Chinese Policies toward Eastern Europe by the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union

    This document addresses China's alleged bid to undermine the unity of the Socialist countries while maintaining special relations with Romania, Yugoslavia, and North Korea. Chinese foreign policy is seen as interfering in the domestic affairs of the Socialist states. By maintaining contacts with Western countries and by encouraging further armament of NATO, China is undermining the position of the Warsaw Pact. The Soviet evaluation assesses China as an unreliable partner in international relations and advises that all contacts of the Chinese government with foreign organizations or authorities be closely monitored.

  • January 25, 1982

    Appendix to 'Some New Phenomena in the Chinese Pursuit to Differentiate Socialist Countries'

    Summary of Chinese foreign relations with socialist countries and anti-Soviet policy.