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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • June 16, 1960

    Report of the Governmental Delegation Visiting Argentina and Cuba

    The document includes excerpts from a Bulgarian delegation's report on their visit to Latin America in 1960. The excerpt covers the delegation's visit to Cuba. Avramova and Agnelov report Cuba's desire to establish diplomatic and cultural relations with Bulgaria. Cuba's interest paramountly involve trade. Avramova and Angelov summarize meetings with important government officials, particulalry Ernesto Guevara, head of the National Bank, and Raul Castro, Minister of Armed Forces. Topics include: the development of the revolution against the Batista government, post-Batista power struggles, geographical fatalism and US influence, Cuba's challenges (e.g. illiteracy, the lack of specialists), land and agricultural reform, construction, industrialization. The delegation recommends the establishment of official relations with Cuba and an invitation for Raul Castro to visit Bulgaria.

  • June 30, 1960

    Central Committee of the Bulgarian Communist Party Politburo Resolution Regarding Establishment of Diplomatic Relations with Cuba

    Resolution of the Bulgarian Communist Party to establish diplomatic relations with Cuba. A report is presented which describes current Cuban economic and trade relations with the Soviet Union, as well as Poland and Czechoslovakia.

  • October 29, 1960

    Information on the VIII Congress of National Socialist Party of Cuba

    In a secret supplement to information from the VIII Congress of the People's Socialist Party, Bulgarian delegates Abramov and Tellalov summarize answers that Blas Roca, the Cuban delegation head, provided the congress. Roca claimed that socialism is the end goal of the revolution, but it is not publicly discussed. He explained the Communist party's involvement in the revolution and July 26th Movement. Abramov and Tellalov also describe the reestablishment of relations and disagreements between Cuba and Yugoslavia, including discussions about weapons. Fidel Castro met with socialist country representatives and described Cuba's plans to nationalize enterprises, particularly American. During the congress Castro described the evolution of the July 26th Movement and the consolidation of Communism in Cuba. Abramov and Tellalov endorse Castro's leadership and review the Cuban military's strengths and weaknesses. There is a brief mention Sino-Soviet relations.

  • March 04, 1961

    Bulgarian Embassy, Havana (Michev), Information Regarding the Reorganization of the Cuban Government

    Bulgaria’s Ambassador to Cuba Konstantin Michev reports on the reorganization of Cuba’s revolutionary government. In the report Michev notes that the government is realigning itself with the intent to become socialist, though not publicizing it. The realignment includes the creation of ministries and committees to oversee the transition and affairs of the country. Fidel Castro, Raul Castro, and Ernesto Guevara are assigned key posts to manage the transition. Through the help of socialist countries, Cuba is developing independent of USA, which previously hampered Cuba’s growth and development. Michev also notes that the Cuban government is prepared to defend itself against counter-revolution and US intervention into Cuban affairs.

  • June 02, 1961

    Politburo Central Committee Bulgarian Communist Party Resolution Regarding Invitation to Fidel Castro to Visit Bulgaria

    Minister of Foreign Affairs Karlo Lukanov advises the Prime Minister Anton Yugov to invite Fidel Castro to visit Bulgaria in addition to his scheduled trip to the Soviet Union, where he is schedule to receive the International Lenin award.

  • August, 1961

    Information and Correspondence with Cuba Regarding Visit to Bulgaria of Cuban Children (including Fidel Castro’s child)

    The Bulgarian Ministry of Foreign Affairs reports on a visit of Cuban children to Bulgaria that is to receive no publicity.

  • August, 1961

    Note on Extending an Invitation to Escalante to Visit Bulgaria

    Dimo Dichev, Head of Foreign Policy and International Relations Department for the Bulgarian Communist Party's Central Committee, suggests inviting Cuban Communist leader Anibal Escalante to visit Bulgaria.

  • August 22, 1961

    Note on Visit of Cuban Children (Including Fidel Castro's son) to Bulgaria

    Through the Bulgarian Embassy in Havana the Deputy Foreign Minister learns about a group of Cuban children scheduled to visit Bulgaria. The group of children includes Fidel Castro's son.

  • September 27, 1961

    Update on Cuban Children Visiting Socialist Countries

    The Ministry of Foreign Affairs updates the Central Committee of the Bulgarian Communist Party on a group of Cuban children touring socialist countries.

  • November 23, 1961

    Note on Cuban Children's Visit to Bulgaria

    Konstantin Tellalov, Deputy Head of the Foreign Policy and International Relations Department of the Bulgarian Communist Party's Central Committee, reports on a visit of Cuban children to Bulgaria.

  • December 02, 1961

    Top Secret Bulgarian Communist Party Politburo Resolution on Arms Delivery to Cuba

    In a report to First Secretary of the Central Committee of the Bulgarian Communist Party, Todor Zhivkov, the Minister of Foreign Trade, Georgi Kumbiliev, reviews Cuba’s need for weapons and credit. Kumbiliev relays a weapons request for Latin American revolutionary movements and an extension of financial assistance to Cuba. Kumbiliev advises Zhivkov to respond to the Cuban government’s requests and consider providing surplus Bulgarian weapons free of charge and extending a 5-year-term loan to Cuba starting 1 Jan 1963.

  • June 01, 1962

    Bulgarian Defense Minister, Note to Zhivkov Regarding Invitation to Raul Castro to Visit Bulgaria

    Bulgarian Minister of National Defense, Colonel General Dobri Djurov, requests First Secretary Todor Zhivkov’s approval to invite Raul Castro to visit Bulgaria.

  • September, 1962

    Decision to Send a Group of Bulgarian Experts to Cuba

    Ivan Prumov , Minister of Agriculture, and Ivan Abadzhiev, First Secretary of the Central Committee of Dimitrov Communist Youth Union (DCYU) address Cuba’s request for young specialists in agriculture (e.g. agronomists, technicians, gardeners). The Bulgarian government agrees to send specialists who will work and live in a State Agrarian Cooperative. The Ministry of Agriculture and Central Committee of DCYU are responsible to send and assist 76 agriculture specialists to Cuba.

  • September 02, 1962

    Note from Cuban Ambassador to Bulgaria, Salvador Garcia Aguero, to Bulgarian Foreign Minister, 2 September 1962

    Warning about the content of Castro’s declaration with regard to US threats against Cuba. Reference to the media and other authorities copies of the declaration.

  • October 18, 1962

    Resolutions by Bulgarian Communist Party Organizations in Havana

    The resolution includes a summary of the annual survey and election meeting of Bulgarian Communist Party organizations in Cuba. The resolution documents the meeting agenda and statements by Bulgarian officials Michev and Hubenov. In his comments, Michev summarizes the international climate in which Bulgarian organizations assisted Cuba. Hubenov’s comments follow. He discusses the political atmosphere in Cuba and disagrees with Michev’s comments on developments of political unity in Cuba. (Michev's comments are not included in the translation.) Hubenov also argues that the Bulgarian government is uninformed of the political situation in Cuba—its invitation for Fidel Castro to visit Bulgaria exemplifies the problem. Hubenov reviews the international impact of the Bay of Pigs invasion, the resulting isolation of Cuba in Latin America, and Castro’s inability to leave Cuba when the revolution’s success is threatened.

  • October 24, 1962

    Message from the Bulgarian Foreign Ministry to the Cuban Embassy in Sofia

    The Bulgarian Foreign Ministry sends respects to the Cuban Embassy in Sofia and states that "competent Bulgarian authorities have included the Republic of Cuba as a socialist country in the plan for 1963."

  • October 24, 1962

    Chief of Staff, Bulgarian Navy, Order Regarding Naval Combat Readiness

    The Chief of Staff of the Bulgarian Navy issued an order to prepare the Navy for mobilization, citing a Bulgarian government declaration about the Cuban missile crisis. The Chief of Staff's secret order includes 19 specific commands for preparation. Commands include orders regarding necessary supplies for combat readiness, repair schedules, deployment, arming vessels, radio communication, and increased surveillance, among others. The Chief of Staff order includes reporting requirements and specific dates for execution.

  • October 27, 1962

    Bulgarian Legation, Washington, to Bulgarian Foreign Ministry

    The Bulgarian diplomatic mission (legation or embassy) to the US reported to the Bulgarian Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Sofia what actions the embassy executed and planned to execute to prevent seizure of documents during the "international situation," or Cuban Missile Crisis. Enclosed in the letter is an explanation of items destroyed and items placed under heightened security. The letter also includes information about security for the embassy staff.

  • October 29, 1962

    Chief of Staff, 2nd Bulgarian Army, Order Regarding Raising Army Air Defense Combat Readiness

    The commander of the Bulgarian 2nd Army, Colonel Alexiev, issued the order to prepare the Army's air defense for combat. Alexiev cites order N 00190/25.10.1962 issued four days prior to justify the heightened defense alert. The order includes six commands related to combat preparation and instructions for anti-aircraft units.

  • November 12, 1962

    Bulgarian Embassy, Havana (Hubenov), to Bulgarian Foreign Ministry

    In a letter from the Bulgarian Embassy to Cuba to the Bulgarian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Deputy Chief of Mission Hubenov writes that confidential archives of the embassy were destroyed at the order of Ambassador Konstantin Michev. Two protocols and a list of demolished materials are referenced in the letter, but not included.