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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • February 18, 1953

    TASS to CPSU on 'Anti-Soviet propaganda of the Voice of America' on Death of Lev Mekhlis

    This TASS information bulletin was sent to the Central Committee and the USSR Council of Ministers. Note the distribution to Stalin and Malenkov only.

  • March 11, 1953

    Memorandum of Discussion at the 136th Meeting of the National Security Council

    The US National Security Council discusses the effect that Stalin’s death had on Soviet policy and on Communist Parties outside of the USSR, as well as the opportunity it provided the US to use Stalin’s death in a psychological strategy to influence the Soviets. The Council also discusses the possibility of negotiations for a settlement with the Soviets in Korea.

  • June 19, 1953

    National Security Council Report, NSC 158, 'United States Objectives and Actions to Exploit the Unrest in the Satellite States'

    Recommendations adopted by the National Security Council at the suggestion of the Psychological Strategy Board on covert actions to be undertaken in the Soviet Satellite States. Authorized by the National Security Council, NSC 158 envisaged aggressive psychological warfare to exploit and heighten the unrest behind the Iron Curtain. The policy was endorsed by President Eisenhower on June 26, 1953.

  • 1955

    Report from S. Rizaev to N.A.Mukhitdinov

    Recommendations for the Soviet Union to imrpove its image among Muslims, including utilizing the physical heritage of Islamic culture within the USSR and respecting freedom of religious practice.

  • January 13, 1959

    Soviet Report, 'The Ideological Aggression of American Imperialism in the Orient'

    This report emphasizes American propaganda in the Middle East, such as promoting democracy and American way of life, as well as its anti-Soviet propaganda. The report also extensively lists the Americans' participation in the region such as how much money and resources were devoted there, including from private institutions.

  • 1963

    KGB Handbook, 'Ukrainian Bourgeois Nationalists' (excerpt)

    KGB handbook describing techniques for identifying, monitoring, and combating anti-Soviet nationalists movements in Ukraine.

  • November 29, 1963

    Cable from the Department of Consular Affairs, Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'On Anti-Revisionist Propaganda'

    Brief report on the status of the Soviet Union and Kazakhstan, including mention of aggressive anti-Chinese propaganda.

  • July 06, 1964

    Note on Issues in Romanian-Soviet Relations Prepared by the Romanian Side for the Conversations in Moscow

    List of the ultimately irreconcilable differences that had arisen in Soviet-Romanian relations under Gheorghe Gheorghiu Dej by July 1964, in preparation for the upcoming discussions in Moscow. Topping the list of major problems were the “anti-Soviet atmosphere in Romania,” the “problem of Soviet citizens,” and the “maintenance of espionage networks” on Romanian territory.

  • July 09, 1965

    Note on a Conversation with an Unnamed Representative of the International Department of the CPSU CC on the Situation in Vietnam [Excerpts]

    An unnamed Soviet official explains that Chinese officers and advisors in Vietnam are discouraging the use of Soviet weapons, despite the fact that they are the most modern and effective.

  • August 19, 1965

    Note by the East German Envoy to Moscow, Rossmeisl, on Talks with Unnamed Soviet Vietnam Specialists

    Unnamed Soviet specialists claim that the USSR's aid to Vietnam is worth 1 million rubles per day. They also argue that because of the amount of aid, the Chinese propaganda claiming a lack of Soviet aid is losing ground among the population in North Vietnam, although the rumor still persists in the South.

  • November 26, 1966

    Gosteleradio Review of Western Radio Propaganda, 'Anti-Communism is the main weapon of imperialist radio propaganda in the Russian language'

    This lengthy review of foreign radio propaganda by Y. Novikov, an official of the USSR Gosteleradio [State Television and Radio] Guidance Department, pays particular attention to what it sees as Western broadcasters’ attempts to discredit Marxism-Leninism and Communist economics, as well as the notion of convergence between capitalism and Communism.

  • April 14, 1967

    Gosteleradio Memo to CPSU Central Committee, 'Ideological Subversion on the Airwaves of Foreign Radio Stations Broadcasting in the Russian language'

    This memo from N. Mesyatsev, Chairman, Broadcast and Television Committee, Council of Ministers, analyzes Western radio “propaganda” and credits Western broadcasts with being “an effective tool of ideological intervention.” The document notes that the broadcasts pay attention to Soviet dissidents, and mentions their use of humor and Western music.

  • November 13, 1969

    Stasi Note on Meeting with KGB Officials, 13 November 1969

    Meeting between KGB First Deputy S. K. Zvigun (Tsvigun) and East German Minister for State Security Mielke. They discuss anti-Soviet "ideological subversion" on the part of the United States and other enemies, as well as Soviet dissidents such as Alexander Solzhenitsyn and Andrei Sakharov.

  • December 29, 1975

    Committee for State Security Report on Anti-Soviet Propaganda and Anti-Socialist Elements

    The Committee for State Security reported on statements from the French and Italian Communist party leaders being used in anti-Soviet propaganda and broadcasted on western radio stations. The use of these statements caused a debate over socialist ideology, human rights, and freedoms. The report looks at prior anti-socialist activity and results of actions in places such as Hungary and Poland. The role of the KGB and decrease in crime rate is also discussed.

  • March 13, 1976

    Committee for State Security Report, 'On the Results of Search for Authors of Anti-Soviet Anonymous Documents in 1975'

    The Committee for State Security reported on results in exposing authors and distributors of anti-Soviet propaganda during 1975. In comparison with results from 1974, the number of authors writing, distributing, and preparing these anti-Soviet documents was overall reduced, but due to copying technology, the volume of documents has grown.

  • May 26, 1976

    Moldavian Communist Party Central Committee, No. 145 ss, to CPSU Central Committee, 'Information on New Falsifications of Russo-Romanian and Soviet-Romanian Relations in the Publications of the Socialist Republic of Romania'

    Report on the "Falsifications" common in nationalist Romanian propaganda. The Moldavian Communist Party was concerned that this material denied the separate political and ethnic identity of Moldavians, insisting that they were Romanian, and was often strongly anti-Soviet. Romania had become the launching point from which, “through different channels, reactionary literature published in the US, FRG, Israel, China, and other countries in which the most extravagant anti-Sovietism prospers penetrates into the Soviet Union.”

  • January 05, 1977

    Committee of State Security Report, 'About Measures to End the Hostile Activity of Members of the So-Called Group For Assistance in the Implementation of The Helsinki Agreements in the USSR'

    This report addresses the anti-Soviet organization "Group for Assistance in the Implementation of the Helsinki Agreements in the Soviet Union" led by Yuri F. Orlov and its influence in Ukraine and Lithuania. The Prosecutor General's office searched houses of several suspects and found anti-Soviet material in preparation for transportation to the West.

  • January 20, 1977

    CC CPSU Proposal, 'On Measures for the Curtailment of the Criminal Activities of Orlov, Ginsburg, Rudenko and Ventslova'

    U.V. Andropov and R.A. Rudenko reported on hostile activities of anti-Soviet groups within the USSR. They stated that Western correspondents influence these organizations to openly protest the Soviet Union's policies. Finally, Andropov and Rudenko discuss preemptive measures that need to be taken in order to stop anti-Soviet propaganda disseminated by these groups.

  • July 20, 1978

    Moldavian Communist Party Central Committee, No. 179 ss, to CPSU Central Committee, 'Information Regarding the Intensification in Romania of a Propaganda Campaign that Harms the Interests of the USSR'

    The Moldavian Communist Party reports on the increasingly anti-Soviet nature of nationalist propaganda in Russia. Moldavian authorities were concerned by how this propaganda denied the existence of a separate Moldavian ethnic identity, while Soviet authorities were especially concerned by Bucharest’s role in attempting to consolidate an anti-Soviet Eurocommunism.

  • December 03, 1979

    Section for Relations with Foreign Countries of the Moldavian Communist Party Central Committee, to MCP Central Committee, 'Information On the Activity of the Radio-Interception Group of the State Committee for Television and Radio of Moldavia'

    List of questions and topics for the Moldavian State Committee for Television and Radio to focus on collecting. The MCP was concerned about tracking anti-Soviet and anti-Moldavian propaganda which originated in Romania.