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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • April 07, 1950

    National Security Council Report, NSC 8/2, "Position of the United States with Respect to Korea"

    Report by the National Security Council to the President on US policy objectives regarding Korea.

  • June 19, 1953

    National Security Council Report, NSC 158, 'United States Objectives and Actions to Exploit the Unrest in the Satellite States'

    Recommendations adopted by the National Security Council at the suggestion of the Psychological Strategy Board on covert actions to be undertaken in the Soviet Satellite States. Authorized by the National Security Council, NSC 158 envisaged aggressive psychological warfare to exploit and heighten the unrest behind the Iron Curtain. The policy was endorsed by President Eisenhower on June 26, 1953.

  • December, 1954

    Message, President Syngman Rhee to General Taylor and his forces

    In this Christmas Message, President Rhee addresses General Taylor and the US Forces. He praises the US troops for their victory against the communist aggression during the Korean War. Rhee recognizes America for continuing to “defend human liberty” not only in Korea but in all of Asia. Rhee ends the message with the goal of creating a “free, united, and democratic” Korea.

  • March 11, 1955

    Letter, Lieutenant General C. B. Ferenbaugh to President Rhee

    The United States has created a policy to aid the Republic of Korea by 1) strengthening the military establishment and, 2) helping stabilize her economy. Military aid would take the form of 720 thousand troops distributed amongst the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, and the Air Force.

  • February 11, 1965

    Minutes from a Conversation between A.N. Kosygin and Mao Zedong

    The Soviet Union sent a delegation to the All-China Assembly of People's Representatives in Beijing. During this time, A.N. Kosygin and Mao Zedong discussed Vietnam including American military actions, Soviet assistance and support, and their socialist path. The conversation then moved towards a debate over spheres of military influence. The Soviets believed that they and the Chinese should unite to fight against American capitalism, but Mao stated that the Soviets should protect Europe and Chine should protect Asia. Other issues addressed included imperialism, Africa, the United Nations, foreign relations, and the concern over factions between communist states and internal factions within parties.