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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • April 30, 1960

    Letter, South African Legation in Vienna, Regarding Relations with the United States

    The South African Legation in Vienna writes to the Department of Foreign Affairs to request a copy of the Union's bilateral agreement with the United States. Mr. Philip at the Department of External Affairs attaches a handwritten note that they won't find anything in the bilateral on grants for nuclear technology; the offer was made generally, in President Eisenhower's subsequent speech.

  • May 04, 1960

    South Africa Department of Foreign Affairs, 'Proposed Application to United States for Assistance in Meeting Costs of Research Reactor in Western Province'

    Discusses how South Africa should go about applying to the United States for financial assistance for the building of a research reactor in the Western Province, under President Eisenhower's 'Atoms for Peace' program.

  • May 05, 1960

    Letter, P. H. Philip, Forwarding Material on South African 'Atoms for Peace' Proposal to United States

    P. H. Philip of the South African Department of Foreign Affairs forwards material on South Africa's application to the United States for financial assistance with the development of a reactor for nuclear research.

  • May 05, 1960

    Letter, P. H. Philip, Regarding South African Application to United States for Nuclear Assistance

    Philip states that South Africa wishes to apply for a grant from the United States for the reactor to be built in the Western Province.

  • May 13, 1960

    Letter, T. Schumann,' Application for Grant from AEC of USA'

    Letter from the Deputy Chairman of the South African Council on Nuclear Power regarding an application to the United States Atomic Energy Commission for assistance.

  • May, 1967

    South Africa Department of Foreign Affairs, 'Items of Interest in the Field of Atomic Energy, Renewal of the Untied States/South Africa Atomic Energy Cooperation Agreement (July 1957 to July 1967)'

    Report on the status of negotiations with Washington over the extension of South Africa's Bilateral with the United States.

  • May, 1967

    Report, South African Department of Foreign Affairs, 'Items of Interest in the Field of Atomic Energy: Developments During March-April-May 1967'

    South African report summarizing communication between South African and US officials on the renewal of their atomic energy cooperation agreement, as well as cooperation with Argentina and France, discussion of the sale of uranium to Israel, and South Africa's redesignation to the IAEA board of governors.

  • May 18, 1967

    Report, South African Foreign Affairs Archives, 'The Nuclear Proliferation Problem'

    Report on the progress of South African discussions with Washington to extend the United States-South Africa Atomic Energy Bilateral

  • August 25, 1970

    United States Department of State, Memorandum from Martin Jacobs to Mr. Nelson on South African Nuclear Scientist’s Visit US Nuclear Testing Facilities

    Martin Jacobs reports that Dr. J. V. Retief, Senior Scientist of the National Nuclear Research Center of the South African Atomic Energy Board requested permission to visit an Army Corps research facility, the Cratering Group Research Labratory at Livermore, California. Jacobs was concerned that "there might be political repercussions if it appeared the US was assisting South Africa to produce nuclear explosives as a prelude to weapons development."

  • October, 1977

    Letter from South African Prime Minister Vorster to US President Carter on US-South Africa Relations

    South African Prime Minister Vorster denies the existence of a South African nuclear program and lists hostile steps taken by the United States to exclude South Africa from international nuclear and atomic energy groups. He concludes that "it would seem... the United States officially holds the view that stability in Southern Africa and the future of our country is to be sacrificed in the hope of stopping Soviet expansionism."

  • November 30, 1978

    Report on South African-American Talks held in Washington on 20, 21, and 22 November 1978 in connection with the "Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act, 1978" (NNPA)

  • December 06, 1978

    Matters Arising from the South African-American Talks held in Washington on 20, 21 and 22 November 1978 in connection with the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act, 1978 (NNPA)

  • March 04, 1981

    Telegram from South African Ambassador in Washington Donald Sole on Prospective Reagan Administration Non-Proliferation Policy

    South African Ambassador Donald Sole reports on the possible effect of Reagan non-proliferation policy on South African/US nuclear relations.

  • May 08, 1981

    Telegram from South African Ministry of Foreign Affairs on Announcement by F.W. de Klerk, Minister of Mineral and Energy Affairs, that SAFARI I Reactor

    South African Ministry of Foreign Affairs informs its missions in Washington, Paris, London, Bonn about an announcement by F.W. De Klerk, Minister of Mineral and Energy Affairs, that under terms agree with the United States and the IAEA, SAFARI I will be operated on locally manufactured fuel.

  • June 12, 1985

    Letter from South African President P.W. Botha to US President Ronald Reagan

    Letter from South African State President P. W. Botha to Ronald Reagan, which discusses South Africa's relations with Mozambique and Mozambique's move away from the Soviet Union. Argues that the West is not supplying enough economic and technical assistance to Mozambique or South Africa, and says that more aid will be necessary to help dissuade foreign interests from depleting the countries' resources.

  • September 06, 1985

    Letter from US President Reagan to South African President P.W. Botha

    Letter from Ronald Reagan to South African State President P. W. Botha, urging Botha to take action to bring peace to South Africa, so that the United States may more effectively assist South Africa in the region. Asserts that talks about race and leadership in South Africa need to be conducted with figures currently imprisoned. Reagan writes that he will veto most of the legislation currently moving through Congress.