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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • August 30, 1978

    Evaluation by the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union of the Normalization of US-Chinese Relations

    In this evaluation of Chinese-US rapprochement, elaborated by the Central Committee (CC) of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union (CPSU), Moscow states that Beijing is going to great lengths to demonstrate its willingness to cooperate closely with Washington, including through the creation of a global strategic alliance between China and the US against the Soviet Union and the entire Socialist community. Moscow urges its Eastern European allies to make use of all political and ideological means available to fight against the creation of a unified front between China and the US.

  • February 09, 1979

    Mongolian Record of Conversation with Soviet Officials in Moscow, February 1979

    Discusses the cancellation of the alliance treaty between China and the Soviet Union, and the impact this will have on the Mongolian People’s Republic. They are urged not to hurry the cancellation of the treaty, however, because China has not yet explicitly asked for it. They also note that there are anti-Soviet propaganda items being spread in Korea, and the growing role the U.S. is playing in Chinese affairs.

  • 1980

    CC CPSU Information on Chinese Foreign Policy Issues

    Discusses the joint efforts by Chinese and American leaders to promote a better relationship between these two countries, at the expense of the Soviet Union and of communism. The U.S. seems to be trying to capitalize on a growing “internal stability” in China, and the U.S. is even now selling equipment to China. The Soviet Union does not believe that this alliance will prove powerful enough to significantly impair other Socialist countries, but their alliance should also not be ignored.

  • February 01, 1980

    CPSU CC Politburo Decision

  • March 04, 1980

    CPSU CC Directive to Soviet Ambassadors in Communist Countries, Instructions 'About the China Question'

    Instructions to Soviet ambassadors on dealing with China's outreach to socialist countries in the eastern bloc, outlining a series of steps for Soviet ambassadors to follow which would foster skepticism about China’s intentions and thwart efforts by Chinese representatives to make wide-ranging contacts in these states. The directive notes China’s hostility to Vietnam, Cuba, Laos, and Mongolia and contrasts this with its development of extensive relations with Romania, Yugoslavia, and North Korea.

  • October 02, 1980

    CPSU CC Politburo Directive to Soviet Ambassadors and Representatives, 'Carrying Out Additional Measures to Counter American-Chinese Military Cooperation'

    Instructions to Soviet ambassadors discussing the growing military cooperation between China and the United States.

  • June, 1981

    Secretary's Talking Points: US-China Relations

    This is a document containing talking points for Secretary of State Alexander Haig's meeting with Deng Xiaoping. Topics addressed in the document include: Chinese exportation of uranium and heavy water to South Africa and Argentina; the intention to suspend the prohibition of arm sales to China; greater nuclear and security cooperation; the increase in Chinese arm sales to countries dependent on the Soviet Union; and the desire to open a new consulate in Shenyang.

  • September 30, 1982

    Information about the Visit of Indira Gandhi to the USSR

    Description of meeting between Indira Gandhi and Soviet representatives. Both sides give similarly critical assessments of Pakistan policy on subcontinent, which both describe as destabilizing to the region. Soviets devote special time to the "dangerous character of military-political partnership between the United States and China," and Indira Gandhi expresses concerns over China's "machinations" against India, and notes the increasing influence of China and America on India's neighboring countries. Gandhi says that Indian-Chinese relations have not improved, due partly to China's position on the India-China border issue.