Search in
ADD SEARCH FILTER CANCEL SEARCH FILTER

Digital Archive International History Declassified

SEARCH RESULTS

  • 1956

    Memorandum from Major General Marian Spychalski to Minister of Foreign Affairs Adam Rapacki

    Spychalski conveys the Ministry of National Defense's proposed supplement to the Treaty on the Status of Soviet Forces Stationed in Poland. The supplement addresses the movement of Soviet units by air and sea.

  • August 07, 1956

    Agreed Policy Governing Radio Free Europe Operations

    CIA and Free Europe Committee (FEC) restate policy for Radio Free Europe in the context of the 1956 upheaval in the Communist world.

  • October 19, 1956

    Protocol No. 129, Meeting of the Polish Politburo

    The Politburo discusses the meeting with the Soviet delegation shortly before and how to proceed with regard to the Soviets and the Plenum.

  • October 19, 1956

    Gomulka's Notes from the 19-20 October Polish-Soviet Talks

    Gomulka's private notes from the Soviet-Russian confrontation at Belvedere Palace.

  • October 19, 1956

    Aleksander Zawadzki’s Notes from the 19-20 October Polish-Soviet Talks

    The Soviet-Polish talks at the Belve-dere Palace began at about 11 a.m. on October 19 and ended at 3 a.m. on October 20. The talks included Khrushchev, Mikoyan, Molotov, and Kaganovich on the Soviet side, and Gomulka, with fourteen members of the PUWP Politburo, on the Polish side. Zawadzki made detailed notes and endeavored to include comments made by a wider range of participants on both sides.

  • October 20, 1956

    Working Notes from the Session of the CPSU CC Presidium on 20 October 1956

    Notes from the meeting of the CPSU Presidium on the issues of Poland and Hungary. Soviet officials discuss preventing the ouster of Polish Marshal Konstantin Rokossowski and forming a committee to possibly replace Gomulka. The Presidium considers events in Hungary with recommendations to dispatch Mikoyan, recall troops to their units, and draft an informational report.

  • October 21, 1956

    Working Notes from the Session of the CPSU CC Presidium on 21 October 1956 On the Situation in Poland

    Khrushchev calls for patience and a refrain from military intervention in Poland. The entire Presidium supports Krushchev.

  • October 23, 1956

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Hungary, ‘The 8th Plenum of the Polish Party Central Committee has met with a Great Response in Hungary’

    The Chinese Embassy in Hungary reports on the responses to the 8th Plenum of the Polish Party Central Committee published in Hungarian newspapers.

  • October 25, 1956

    Maj. Witold Osinski, Reports on the Events of 19-23 October 1956

    Reports recounting Osinski's experiences with infighting between the Polish Ministry of Defense (MND), and the Stalinist Internal Security Corps (ISC). The reports also take place during the Polish October (Gomulka' Thaw). Normal font indicates that the text appears in both instances of the document. Italics indicates that the text appears only in the original, handwritten version of the document. Bold font indicates that the text appears only in the final, typed version for Gomulka.

  • October 26, 1956

    Working Notes from the Session of the CPSU CC Presidium on 26 October 1956

    Liu Shaoqi of the CPC CC tells the CPSU Presidium that the Rokossowski issue is central in Poland. The Presidium considers incoming information sent by Mikoyan and Suslov from Budapest. It is recommended that Hungarians studying in Moscow be instructed and sent back to Budapest to end the “vacillations” within the CC. Presidium members are critical of Mikoyan and call for a firm line with Hungary. Khrushchev commits to sending three more Presidium members to Hungary, contacting ousted Prime Minister Andras Hegedus, and reinforcing the troops.

  • November 01, 1956

    Bulgarian Military Intelligence Information on the Situation in Hungary and Poland

    This intelligence report discusses the domestic political developments in Poland after the ascent of Wladyslaw Gomulka to the top of the Polish United Workers' Party (PZPR).The events surrounding the Hungarian Revolution of 1956 are also mentioned.

  • November 14, 1956

    US Government Appraisal of Radio Free Europe Broadcasts

    Cord Meyer forwards to Allen Dulles a State Department assessment dated November 13, 1956, of Radio Free Europe Hungarian and Polish broadcasts. The assessment was requested by Secretary of State John Foster Dulles and was prepared by State Department official L. Randolph Higgs, responsible for coordinating RFE issues with CIA, and Meyer, who objected to an initial State Department draft.

  • November 22, 1956

    Diary of Soviet Ambassador P.F. Yudin, Memorandum of Conversation with Liu Shaoqi of 30 October 1956

    Liu Shaoqi discusses the potential withdrawal of Soviet advisors from China. Although the Chinese government was considering sending back some specialist, they did not want the abrupt removal of all specialists as happened in Yugoslavia. Liu Shaoqi also brings up the 1956 uprisings in Hungary and Poland, saying that such events were a “useful lesson for the entire communist movement.”

  • November 26, 1956

    Memorandum from the Minister of Foreign Affairs [Adam Rapacki] to Minister of National Defense Marian Spychalski

    The Minister of Foreign Affairs requests the Ministry of National Defense's consideration of the Treaty on the Status of Soviet Forces Stationed in Poland prior to negotiations in Moscow.

  • December 26, 1956

    Memorandum of Meeting with Khrushchev, Moscow

    After lightly rebuking Hoxha's choices to use public trials for the executions of political criminals, Khrushchev reassures Hoxha of the Soviet Union's support for Albania, and concludes with a summary of the Soviet Union's current standing in the international sphere.

  • January 07, 1957

    Memorandum for International Organizations Division Chief, 'Reflections on Radio Free Europe's Present Position and Potentials; Lines for Poland, etc.'

    Frank Wisner, reflecting on the Hungarian Revolution, suggests that Soviet Communism is on the defensive and RFE broadcasts to Poland should discourage violence while supporting Party leader Gomulka’s efforts to gain more autonomy from the Soviet Union. IOD Chief Cord Meyer annotates the memorandum.

  • January 10, 1957

    Memorandum on the Warsaw Treaty and the Development of the Armed Forces of the People's Republic of Poland

    The Polish general staff analyzes the military obligations mandated by the Warsaw Treaty and how stated obligations are not compatible with Polish policy. Proposals for revision of the military articles of the Warsaw Treaty are outlined.

  • January 11, 1957

    Notes from the Completed Discussions of 11 and 12 January 1957 between the Delegates of the Chinese People’s Republic and Poland (Excerpts)

    Gomulka describes the 1956 Polish protests and his confrontation with Soviet authorities.

  • April 15, 1957

    Memorandum of Conversation with East German Ambassador Fr. Everhartze

    Meeting with East German Ambassador Everhartze concerning the recently concluded Chinese-Polish negotiations and the recent 1956 uprisings in Poland. The main purpose of the visit was to find out about the future visit ofZhou Enlai to Czechoslovakia, because the GDR has also invited Zhou Enlai to a state visit.

  • January 30, 1958

    Radio Free Europe Broadcasts to Poland Reappraised

    Radio Free Europe, State Department, and CIA officials review Radio Free Europe broadcasts to Poland in response to State Department criticism