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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • July 28, 1987

    US District Court, 'Indictment: US of America Vs. Arshad Pervez and Inam Ul-Haq'

    The indictment against Pervez and Ul-Haq included charges of conspiracy, bribery, racketeering, export violations, and false statements.

  • September 02, 1987

    Consulate Lahore Telegram 0524 to Embassy Islamabad, Information Department of State, 'Pervez Nuclear Arrest Case—Possible Location of Brig. Inam Ul Haq'

    A confidential source told consular officials that the Pakistani government had detained Inam Ul Haq and was “being rotated between various locations” in Pakistan-controlled Kashmir.

  • December 14, 1987

    Department of State, Memorandum from Jonathan Schwartz to Ms. Verville [et al.], 'Pervez Trial Status'

    After hearing tape-recorded conversations and seeing Pervez’s diary entries and the Pervez-Carpenter correspondence, on 17 December 1987, the jury found him guilty on 5 out of 8 counts, including conspiracy, attempted export of beryllium without the required license, and submitting false end-use statements about the maraging steel. Inam Ul-Haq was also found guilty of conspiracy and false statements.

  • December 17, 1987

    Department of State Telegram to US Embassy Islamabad, 'Pervez Case Verdict'

    After hearing tape-recorded conversations and seeing Pervez’s diary entries and the Pervez-Carpenter correspondence, on 17 December 1987, the jury found him guilty on 5 out of 8 counts, including conspiracy, attempted export of beryllium without the required license, and submitting false end-use statements about the maraging steel. Inam Ul-Haq was also found guilty of conspiracy and false statements.

  • December 23, 1987

    Department of State, Memorandum from Jonathan Schwartz to Ms. Verville [et al.], 'Pervez Trial Status'

    After hearing tape-recorded conversations and seeing Pervez’s diary entries and the Pervez-Carpenter correspondence, on 17 December 1987, the jury found him guilty on 5 out of 8 counts, including conspiracy, attempted export of beryllium without the required license, and submitting false end-use statements about the maraging steel. Inam Ul-Haq was also found guilty of conspiracy and false statements.