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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • May 04, 1953

    Letter, General Duk Shin Choi to General William K. Harrison, Jr. on Civilian Internees

    From April 20 to May 3 1953, Operation Little Switch allowed the exchange of the sick and wounded prisoners of wars between the United Nations, North Korea, and China. In this letter, Major General Choi informs General Harrison that the communist have failed to return hundreds of U.N. POWs because of their broad interpretation of the agreement. General Choi provides a series of steps to improve this agreement but most importantly he urges that the terms “civilian internees” and “displaced person” should be clarified in the Draft Armistice Agreement.

  • June 17, 1953

    Report from A. Grechko and Tarasov in Berlin to N.A. Bulganin, 6:30 p.m.

    In the Soviets' view the situation in Berlin was improving as the principal gorvernment buildings were safe and were guarded by Soviet forces. Martial law has been declared in Magdeburg, Leipzig, Dresden, Halle, Goerlitz, and Brandenburg.

  • August 05, 1953

    Summary Record of the Conference held between President Rhee and Secretary Dulles (First Session)

    In early August of 1950, delegates from the United States and the Republic of Korea met to discuss the logistics for the forthcoming conferences centered on the creation of a strong US-ROK mutual defense treaty. The delegates also propose who can and should be present. While both sides agree that North Korea and China should be included, President Rhee advocates that due to India’s Prime Minister’s “pro-communist views,” India should not be invited.

  • August 06, 1953

    Summary Record of the Conference held between President Rhee and Secretary Dulles (Second Session)

    During the second Dulles-Rhee conference, President Rhee and Secretary Dulles led the discussion with the subject of Korean rehabilitation. Rhee makes a few suggestions that both sides should consider if Korean reconstruction should take place. These suggestions include: 1) rehabilitating Korean productive industry, 2) directly allocating money for Korea’s rehabilitation instead of doing so through the reconstruction of the Japanese economy and, 3) prevent the importation of Japanese technicians to Korea. Dulles answers he will consider Rhee suggestions, however, the US will continue to aid Japan to prevent losing her to communism.

  • April 20, 1954

    Transcript, Zhou Enlai's presentation at the meeting of members of the Chinese delegation attending the Geneva Conference (excerpt), 5:00 a.m.

    In his presentation Zhou Enlai is encourages fellow communist countries who are to participate in the Geneva Conference to work together and perform well on the international stage.

  • June 05, 1956

    Memorandum of Conversation with Choe Chang-ik

    Ambassador Ianov and Choe Chang-ik discuss the visit of the DPRK government delegation to Eastern Europe and the USSR and the policies of the Korean Worker's Party.

  • October 08, 1956

    Note from N. Khrushchev to the CPSU CC Presidium regarding conversations with Yugoslav leaders in Yugoslavia

    Khrushchev describes his conversations with Josip Broz Tito during his visit to Yugoslavia. They discussed the issues of U.S. aid to Yugoslavia, the Turkish and Greek conflict over Cyprus, the expansion of contact between Soviet and Yugoslav workers and the path to socialism. Tito appeared uneasy and was dissatisfied with relations between the Soviet Union and Yugoslavia.

  • October 30, 1956

    Working Notes from the Session of the CPSU CC Presidium on 30 October 1956

    The Presidium decides to promulgate a declaration on Hungary in which Soviet withdrawal and relations with the new government will be addressed. Members discuss the language of the new declaration and the advice of the CPC CC regarding the status of Soviet troops. The declaration is also intended to address the broader crisis in Soviet relations with people’s democracies.

  • November 01, 1956

    Bulgarian Military Intelligence Information on the Situation in Hungary and Poland

    This intelligence report discusses the domestic political developments in Poland after the ascent of Wladyslaw Gomulka to the top of the Polish United Workers' Party (PZPR).The events surrounding the Hungarian Revolution of 1956 are also mentioned.

  • September 11, 1964

    Letter from the Korean Workers Party Central Committee to the Central Committee of the CPSU

    The Socialist Unity Party of Germany reports on a critique by North Korea concerning the Soviet Union's effort to call a meeting of all socialist/communist countries. In the attached letter, North Korea expresses concern for a split between socialist countries.

  • March 23, 1967

    Bulgarian State Security Chairman Angel Solakov’s Report at a Bulgarian Communist Party Plenum

    According to the State Security Committee chair, Angel Solakov, there has been a major shift in the policies of the West towards the Soviet bloc. While during the 1950s military face-off was often considered an option, in the late 1960s such possibility has been largely ruled out. Consequently the US and their allies in Western Europe are focusing their efforts on fighting socialism around the world through peaceful means, such as strengthening economic and cultural ties with the Soviet bloc countries. This calls for a change in the strategy of the State Security Committee intelligence operations. Solakov also reports on the anti-Soviet activities of the Chinese and Albanian intelligence services across Europe.

  • September 20, 1972

    Bulgarian Politburo decision on Intelligence Activity Against China

    BCP CC Politburo approves the request of the Minister of Internal Affairs, Angel Tzanev, for an increase in the intelligence staff in response to the need for expanding intelligence operations in China, Albania, Romania, Yugoslavia and Vietnam – a move closely coordinated with the KGB.

  • March 07, 1975

    Plan on joint counter-intelligence measures between the KGB and Czechoslovak Ministry of the Interior from summer 1975 until 1977

    This agreement outlines cooperation on security issues concerning hostile ideological centers, emigrant groups and anti-socialist, anti-Soviet, revisionist and nationalist groups. Also discussed in detail are ecclesiastical organizations, the alteration of informational and occupational gatherings between the two countries and scientific, cultural and students exchanges.

  • March 11, 1976

    Minutes of the Meeting between Todor Zhivkov and Fidel Castro in Sofia

    Conversation for the record between Zhivkov and Castro during a four-day-long state visit of the Cuban leader to Bulgaria. Among the main issues discussed was the state of economic development in both countries, their relations with Albania, China, Romania and Yugoslavia; the Cuban foreign policy in Africa and the Caribbean; the civil war in Angola; the battle for the Third World.

  • April 22, 1980

    Minutes of Conversation between Todor Zhivkov and Yasser Arafat, Damascus

    The two leaders discuss the situation in the Middle East, and the role of the superpowers - the US and the Soviet Union.

  • 1981

    Cooperative Agreement between the Interior Ministry of the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic and the Interior Ministry of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics for 1981

    This document outlines plans for employee exchanges in the areas of: research, criminology, fire prevention, hospital management, political education and state security police. Both parties decide to exchange publications on security, criminology, subversive activities in the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic, fire prevention and the Soviet military, all designated by title and number of copies.

  • October 23, 1981

    Cooperative Agreement between the Interior Ministry of the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic and the Soviet KGB for the summer of 1981 - 1985

    The two parties consent to assist each other in the surveillance of goods going between the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic and the Soviet Union, letters going between the two countries and from them to capitalist countries, correspondence sent from Czechoslovak or Soviet citizens to people who recently arrived from capitalist countries, the mailing of anti-socialist materials sent through the two nations and mail involving anti-socialist propaganda sent to either country from capitalist countries. Both parties also agree to exchange information on ways subversives use the post to their advantage and how each country’s officials monitor post suspected of containing ideologically injurious material.

  • December 11, 1981

    Cooperative agreement between the state security organs of the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic and the Soviet Union

    The parties agree to work together in protecting their soldiers from ideological diversion by anti-socialist agents and to continue exchanging information gathered by military counter-intelligence.

  • October 20, 1983

    Statement by CPSU Central Committee and USSR Minister of Defense, Marshal of the Soviet Union D. F. Ustinov, at the extraordinary session of the Committee of Defense Ministers of Warsaw Treaty Member States on 20 October 1983 [in Berlin]

    CPSU Central Committee and USSR Minister of Defense, Marshal of the Soviet Union D. F. Ustinov make a statement to Warsaw Treaty member states addressing the decision by the US and NATO to deploy new American medium-range missiles in Europe. He appeals for improvement of the Unified Forces.

  • May 28, 1984

    Report from the Visit in Moscow on May 14-19, 1984, at the Academic Conference on 'The Problems of Security and Peace in the Far East'

    The conference involved the participation of major Sinological centers and representatives of the foreign ministries of nine countries (Bulgaria, Hungary, the GDR, Mongolia, Poland, Cuba, Vietnam, Czechoslovakia, and the Soviet Union). It focused on aspects of peace and security in the Far East.