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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • April 26, 1956

    Faculty of Mathematics and Physics at Charles University, Prague, 'Resolution Adopted by the Faculty Organization of the Czechoslovak Youth Union'

    A student resolution written during the 1956 student protests in Czechoslovakia. It argues for a review of the national education system, specifically to allow for more focus on practical subjects than on Communism and Russian language classes. Additionally, it demands fairer political trials and punishments, while noting the overall deleterious affect that "the Soviet experience" has had on the country.

  • November 01, 1956

    Bulgarian Military Intelligence Information on the Situation in Hungary and Poland

    This intelligence report discusses the domestic political developments in Poland after the ascent of Wladyslaw Gomulka to the top of the Polish United Workers' Party (PZPR).The events surrounding the Hungarian Revolution of 1956 are also mentioned.

  • August 21, 1968

    Letter from the Central Committees of the Bulgarian, East German, Hungarian, Polish, and Soviet Communist Parties regarding the Warsaw Pact intervention in Czechoslovakia

    Letter from the Central Committees of the Communist Parties of East Germany, Poland, Hungary, Bulgaria and the Soviet Union explaining the need for intervention in Czechoslovakia. The letter lays out the rationale behind the Brezhnev Doctrine.

  • November 05, 1968

    Report Relayed by Andropov to the CPSU Central Committee, 'Students and the Events in Czechoslovakia'

    KGB Chairman Yuri Andropov presents a secret, 33-page report to the CPSU Central Committee about the mood of Soviet college students. The report had been completed sometime before the Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia, and had been circulating within the KGB. It is not clear precisely who drafted the report, but Andropov’s cover memorandum and the report itself indicate that the author was a college student in Odessa who had recently finished his degree.

  • November 26, 1968

    Note on the events at the Seminar of Red Cross Journals from Socialist Countries, held in Prague, 19-22 Nov. 1968. Cover note from Anton Moisescu, President of the Romanian Red Cross, to Nicolae Ceausescu, Secretary General, CC RCP.

    Note about the experiences of N. Palade, Chief Editor of the Romanian Red Cross journal "Sanatatea" at the Socialist bloc seminar of Red Cross journals. The information note discusses Czechoslovak reactions to the Soviet-led invasion and occupation of Czechoslovakia and especially of Prague. Palade describes his reception by the Czechoslovak officials and the current attitude of the Czechoslovak population vis-à-vis the Soviet Union and the other East Bloc countries, describing the pessimism that seized the population after the August 1968 invasion.

  • April 09, 1971

    Letter, UNCURK Principal Secretary Kuzbari to UN Chef de Cabinet Narasimhan

    Student demonstrations are occurring in South Korea in reaction to the state's intervention and control of student activity. In light of the 1961 student protests, the government is not using repressive measures to suppress the demonstrations.

  • May 21, 1971

    Letter, UNCURK Principal Secretary Kuzbari to UN Chef de Cabinet Narasimhan

    ROK claims of North Korean sea infiltration are challenged by UN Command and UNCURK. Additionally, student protests are growing, but DRP's reaction is cautious because they fear that the students may align with NDP and pose a threat to the DRP.

  • October 21, 1971

    Letters, UNCURK Principal Secretary Ozbudun to UN Chef de Cabinet Narasimhan

    Ozbudun updates Narasimhan on domestic and peninsular political developments. President Park instates the Garrison Act of 1950 on college campuses, increasing repression tactics. The National Assembly reconvened after 12 days of deadlock over the agenda. While the Red Cross "family search campaign" is in deadlock over the agenda, the general mood is positive.

  • November 11, 1971

    Letter, Ozbudun to Narasimhan, "Removal of the 'Garrison Act'"

    Ozbudun informs Narasimhan about the lifting of the "Garrison Act" effective 9 November 1971 by the ROK Government.

  • October 13, 1987

    Information from D. Stoyanov to G. Yordanov on Discontent Among Sofia University Employers and Professors

    The Minister of Internal Affairs, Dimitar Stoyanov, informs the Education Minister, Georgi Yordanov, about intelligence reports regarding the rise of discontent among professors, employees and students at the University of Sofia.

  • November 18, 1989

    Cable from US Embassy in Prague on Czech Demonstrations

    The US embassy in Prague reports on the brutal suppression of the Czech students' demonstration.

  • November 20, 1989

    Cable from US Embassy in Prague on Czech Demonstrations

    Cable from the US embassy in Prague reports on an American woman's account of the November 17 demonstrations and the death of a Czech student.

  • November 20, 1989

    Cable from US Embassy in Prague on Czech Demonstrations

    Cable from the US embassy in Prague reporting on the establishment of a new organization for Czech independents, the "Civic Forum," and the publication of a list of demands.

  • November 20, 1989

    Cable from US Embassy in Prague on Czech Demonstrations

    Cable from the US embassy in Prague reporting on contradictions in the Czechoslovak press coverage of the demonstrations' aftermath.

  • November 20, 1989

    Cable from US Embassy in Prague on Czech Demonstrations

    Cable from the US embassy in Prague reporting that demonstrations continued over the weekend in Prague.

  • November 20, 1989

    Cable from US Embassy in Prague on Czech Demonstrations

    Cable from the US embassy in Prague reporting on their protest regarding attacks on American journalists during the November 17-19 demonstrations in Prague.

  • November 21, 1989

    Cable from US Embassy in Prague on Czech Demonstrations

    Cable from the US embassy in Prague reporting on continued demonstrations in Prague and other Czech cities on November 20.

  • November 21, 1989

    Cable from US Embassy in Prague on Czech Demonstrations

    Cable from the US embassy in Prague reporting on the morning demonstration in Wenceslas Square and overheard conversations.

  • November 21, 1989

    Cable from US Embassy in Prague on Czech Demonstrations

    Cable from the US embassy in Prague reporting on the student strike situation.

  • November 24, 1989

    Speech by Premier Ladislav Adamec at the Extraordinary Session of the Czechoslovak Communist Party Central Committee

    This transcript shows the Czech party elites choosing against violent repression of the mass protests in Wenceslas Square. More clearly than in almost any other Party document, the reasons for nonviolence are spelled out: such a solution would only temporarily "return calm," it would radicalize the youth, "the international support of the socialist countries can no longer be counted on," and "the capitalist states" might react with a "political and economic boycott."