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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • September 27, 1946

    Telegram from Nikolai Novikov, Soviet Ambassador to the US, to the Soviet Leadership

    Soviet Ambassador to the US, Nikolai Novikov, describes the advent of a more assertive US foreign policy. Novikov cautions the Soviet leadership that the Truman administration is bent on imposing US political, military and economic domination around the world. This telegram has, since its discovery in the Russian archives, been labelled the Soviet equivalent of US Ambassador to the Soviet Union George Kennan's "Long telegram."

  • October 27, 1946

    Cable Nos. 97-98, Molotov to Druzhkov [Stalin]

    A cable discussing Molotov's intention to give a speech at the UN about veto powers, atom bombs, and arm reductions. He will offer a proposal from the Soviet delegation calling for universal arms reductions, a ban on the use of atomic energy for warlike aims, and efforts towards global peace and security.

  • November 07, 1946

    Cable No. 198, Molotov to Druzhkov [Stalin]

    A cable discussing the Soviet proposal for arms reduction and the American reaction to the proposal. Molotov proposes adding a fifth point to their original proposal: the creation, via the Security Council, of an institute for international control.

  • November 26, 1946

    Incoming Cable No. 2151, Druzhkov [Stalin] to Cde. Molotov

    Stalin agrees to Molotov's additional points on mutual arms reduction. Proposes creating under the UNSC a special inspection organ. To do this the following shall be created: control commissions on the fulfillment of the arms reduction agreement and militarized nuclear energy. The former should be temporary, the latter permanent, but they shouldn't highlight that the former is only temporary.

  • November 26, 1946

    Cable Nos. 423-424, Molotov to Druzhkov [Stalin]

    A letter from Molotov, discussing an additional point the Soviets plan to add to their proposal and seeking approval from Stalin. The point recommends a special commission within the Security Council for the purposes of both arms reduction and nuclear arms control.

  • November 26, 1946

    Cable Nos. 423-424, Molotov to Cde. Druzhkov [Stalin]

    A cable from Molotov, discussing an additional point the Soviets plan to add to their proposal and seeking approval from Stalin. The point recommends a special commission within the Security Council for the purposes of both arms reduction and nuclear arms control.

  • December 02, 1946

    Cable Nos. 509-511, Molotov to Druzhkov [Stalin]

    A copy of the draft resolution submitted by the United States to the UN, regarding arms reduction. Molotov thinks that this draft may be taken as a basis with the introduction of some changes he plans to report at a later time.

  • December 02, 1946

    Cable Nos. 512-515, Molotov to Druzhkov [Stalin]

    An outline of the Soviet Union's proposed changes to the USA's draft proposal for arms reduction (submitted to the UN).

  • December 03, 1946

    Incoming Cable No. 2209, Druzhkov [Stalin] to Cde. Molotov

    Stalin approves of the American draft for arms control as a basis, but instructs Molotov to insist on specific wording for certain points. He also does not recommend introducing any addendums as he believes they will fail.

  • December 19, 1946

    Telegram, Gromyko to Cde. Dekanozov

    A copy of a report to be submitted to the Security Council, detailing a commission's conclusions and recommendations for future control of atomic energy.

  • October 17, 1947

    George C. Marshall, 'A Program for a More Effective United Nations: Address by the Chief of the U.S. Delegation to the General Assembly'

    Marshall speaks about Greece, Palestine, and Korea, as well as the international control of atomic energy and the role and structure of the United Nations.

  • June 26, 1950

    Telegram from Lake Success, Trygve Lie to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Moscow

    A telegram conveying the UN Security Council's resolution calling for North Korea to withdraw from the 38th Parallel.

  • June 27, 1950

    Statement by the President, Truman on Korea

    Truman's statement on the invasion of South Korea by North Korean forces.

  • July 01, 1950

    Conversation between Indian Ambassador Kavalam Madhava Panikkar and Deputy Foreign Minister Zhang Hanfu

    Zhang Hanfu and K.M. Panikkar discuss the role of the United Nations in ending the conflict in Korea.

  • July 02, 1950

    Incoming Cable No. 19413, Roschin to the Central Committee

    Roschin tells the CC of his meeting with Zhou Enlai, in which they discussed talks with the Indian ambassador over maneuvering at the UN, and over the possibility of Chinese intervention in Korea against American forces.

  • August 27, 1950

    Letter from Filipov (Stalin) to Soviet Ambassador in Prague, conveying message to CSSR leader Klement Gottwald

    Stalin lists the reasons for the Soviet withdrawal from and the return to the United Nations Security Council.

  • September, 1950

    Communist Activity

    Communist parties liquidate several leaders in Syria and Lebanon, students from Lebanon contact the Security Council to call for intervention, and Lebanese and Syrian leaders follow suit.

  • December 05, 1950

    VKP(b) CC Politburo decision with approved orders to Vyshinsky in New York and Roshchin in Beijing with message for Zhou Enlai

    Memorandums from the VKP(b) CC to Vyshinsky and Roshchin regarding the Soviet and PRC stances on discussions in the UN General Assembly and Security Council on the Chinese intervention in Korea.

  • November 19, 1951

    Soviet Politburo Decision with Approved Message from Gromyko to Razuvaev

    Telegram from Gromyko to Razuvaev requiring more clear explanation about the earlier inquiry regarding Korean situation.

  • January 04, 1955

    Minutes of Conversation between Premier Zhou Enlai and Soviet Ambassador Pavel Yudin regarding Dag Hammarskjold’s Trip to Beijing

    The Soviet ambassador brought to Zhou Enlai a telegram between the United Nations Secretary-General Dag Hammarskjöld and the UN Assistant Secretary-General. The telegram stated that Hammarskjöld was going to visit Beijing for negotiating the release of the US pilots who had served in the Korean War and been captured by the Chinese.