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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • June 12, 1956

    Protocol No. 27/56 of the Extraordinary Meeting of the Politburo of the Central Committee on 12 June 1956 between 0900 and 1000 hours in the Central House of Unity

    GDR decides what aid it will give the North Korea and which credits and technical devices they will offer until 1960.

  • June 08, 1958

    Journal of Soviet Ambassador in the DPRK A. M. Puzanov for 8 June 1958

    Puzanov learns about North Korea's involvement in COMECON and the agricultural situation in Jagang and South Hwanghae Provinces.

  • January 11, 1961

    Information from MVR Inspectorate on Yugoslav Intelligence Services Against Bulgaria

    The Ministry of Internal Affairs reports its intelligence findings on the activities of the Yugoslav intelligence services against Bulgaria. Working both from home and in-country, the Yugoslav intelligence is allegedly trying to gather information on a broad set of issues – ranging from trade relations within Comecon, to Bulgaria’s military capacity and its potential to pose a threat to Yugoslav Macedonia.

  • June 19, 1962

    Fifth Official Meeting Between the Delegation of the Albanian Labor Party and the Delegation of the Chinese Communist Party

    Albanian leaders Hysni Kapo and Ramiz Alia meet with a Chinese delegation to discuss industrialization in Communist countries, specificallyAlbania's five-year plan. The Albanians complain about being excluded from international meetings of the socialist countries. The Chinese update the Albanians on their position of supporting Jiang Jieshi over the "Two Chinas" objective of the United States and their relations with other countries throughout Asia, while encouraging the Albanians to reach out to the Muslim nations of Africa.

  • August, 1962

    Report, Embassy of Hungary in North Korea to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    Hungarian Chargé d’Affaires ad interim Károly Fendler reports on the inefficient management practices and unrealistic goals set by North Korea's leadership, idiosyncrasies in Kim Il Sung's leadership, and North Korea's relations with China and the Soviet Union.

  • August 26, 1962

    Memorandum of Conversation between Soviet Ambassador to North Korea Vasily Moskovsky and North Korean Foreign Minister Pak Seongcheol

    Park Seong-cheol informs Moskovsky of the rationale behind DPRK's new dictum of "self-reliance".

  • April 03, 1963

    Memorandum of Conversation between Yuri Andropov and the Central Committee of the Romanian Worker’s Party

    Soviet politburo member Yuri Andropov and Gheorghe Gheorghiu-Dej discuss issues concerning the cooperation between the CPSU and the Romanian Worker's party and the two governments. The discussion ranges between economic integration issues, to the Sino-Soviet split, Soviet-Albanian relations, and politico-military cooperation between Warsaw Pact states.

  • March 03, 1964

    Conversations between Delegations of the Romanian Workers Party and the Chinese Communist Party in Beijing, 3-10 March 1964 (excerpts)

    Ion Gheorghe Maurer and Nicolae Ceauşescu of Romania meet with Liu Shaoq, Deng Xiaoping, and other Chinese Communist officials. The Romanians discuss the Sino-Soviet Split, the Council for Mutual Economic Assistance, and the organizing structure of the Warsaw Pact. Maurer expresses frustration with the Soviet Union, referencing the Cuban Missile Crisis and similar "circumstances in which decisions were taken unilaterally, expressing only the Soviet point of view."

  • June 29, 1964

    Report, Embassy of Hungary in North Korea to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    The Hungarian Ambassador to North Korea reports on a trade dispute between North Korea and the Soviet Union.

  • July, 1964

    Conversations Between Delegations of the Romanian Workers Party and the Communist Party of the Soviet Union in Moscow, July 1964 (excerpts)

    Delegates from Romania discuss the strained Soviet-Romanian relationship with Soviet officials. Issues raised include the organizational structure of the Warsaw Pact’s military forces, the Council of Mutual Economic Assistance (CMEA or Comecon), and the existence of Soviet spies and espionage networks in Romania, the Soviet insistence that all Communist countries should support their proposals in international bodies and vote as a block, and other unilateral Soviet decisions such as placing missiles in Cuba in 1962.

  • July 06, 1964

    Note on Issues in Romanian-Soviet Relations Prepared by the Romanian Side for the Conversations in Moscow

    List of the ultimately irreconcilable differences that had arisen in Soviet-Romanian relations under Gheorghe Gheorghiu Dej by July 1964, in preparation for the upcoming discussions in Moscow. Topping the list of major problems were the “anti-Soviet atmosphere in Romania,” the “problem of Soviet citizens,” and the “maintenance of espionage networks” on Romanian territory.

  • August 03, 1964

    Comrade Zhou Enlai, Comrade Peng Zhen Receive Tran Tu Binh, Vietnam’s Ambassador to China; Nesti Nase, Albania’s Ambassador to China; and Pak Se-chang, Korea’s Ambassador to China

    The meeting was among leaders from China, Vietnam, North Korea and Albania in 1964. They discussed Soviet-Romanian relations and plans to support Romania.

  • May 12, 1966

    Conversations Between Emil Bodnăraş, Romanian Party and Government Delegation Leader, and Zhou Enlai, Prime Minister of the State Council of the Peoples Republic of China in Beijing (excerpts)

    Bodnaras and Enlai discuss both Romania and China's strained relations with the Soviet Union.

  • August 04, 1970

    Reports Regarding Bulgarian leader Todor Zhivkov’s visit to Cuba, July-August 1970, at Bulgarian Communist Party Politburo Session (including excerpts from Zhivkov-Fidel Castro memorandum of conversation)

    The Bulgarian Communist Party Politburo report includes three main documents: a protocol and resolution with notes, a top secret information note, and a top secret protocol from 30 July 1970. The first section includes the Politburo's approval of the delegation's negotiations with Cuba, proposals to restructure economic partnership, and the Bulgarian delegation's statements on miscommunication between Cuba and Bulgaria. The second section, top secret information note, summarizes important exchanges during the Bulgarian visit to Cuba (e.g. Zhivkov's discussion on the importance of economic cooperation (COMECON) to the development of socialism). The third section, the top secret protocol, includes portions of a conversation between Bulgarian delegation and Cuban Politburo members. Castro summarizes ideas exchanged during the state visit.

  • December 15, 1970

    Memorandum Regarding Bulgarian-Cuban Relations

    In a memorandum, Konstantin Tellalov, Head of the Foreign Policy and International Relations Department of the Central Committee of BCP, and Foreign Minister Ivan Bashev evaluate Cuban-Bulgarian relations. Tellalov and Bashev contextualize Cuba's development both nationally and internationally. Cuba's primary concerns are related to its economy (re: housing, rationing, embargo). Cuba's leadership continues to display a limited understanding of Marxism-Leninism, scientific planning (central planning), and the importance of COMECON. Taking into consideration the Bulgarian delegation’s recent visit to Cuba, they stress the importance of Cuba's success and the need for a radical, all-embracing commitment to relations.

  • January 11, 1971

    Report, Polish Embassy in Bucharest, 'Romania After the Agreements on Friendship with the Soviet Union, Poland and Bulgaria'

    The Polish Embassy in Romania reports on trends in Romanian foreign relations. There are signs of rapprochement with the other socialist countries in the Warsaw Pact after Romania reversed course to join Comecon. Yet Ceaușescu continued to court China and the United States as well.

  • June 25, 1971

    Minutes of the Romanian Politburo Meeting Concerning Nicolae Ceauşescu's Visit to China, North Korea, Mongolia, and Vietnam

    These are the minutes of a meeting of the Central Committee of the Romanian Communist Party discussing Romanian leader Nicolae Ceauşescu's 1971 visit to China. Ceauşescu reports on his visits to Chinese enterprises, universities, and laboratories, and acknowledges the achievements of the Cultural Revolution. The report on China is followed by comments on his subsequent visits to North Korea, Vietnam, and Mongolia. Finally, the discussion turns to Moscow's criticism of Ceauşescu's anti-Soviet statements during his stay in the Middle East.

  • February 01, 1972

    Cryptogram No 1144 from Polish Embassy in Bucharest, Romania Strengthening Relations with the Soviet Union

    The Polish Embassy in Romania reports on signs that Romania is serious about improving relations with the Soviet Union, including signing agreements to join Comecon and put the Romanian army under joint command of the Warsaw Pact.

  • May, 1972

    Report on Fidel Castro’s Visit to Bulgaria and Bulgarian-Cuban relations

    The report details Bulgaria’s preparations for a Cuban delegation and the visit itself. The author offers both praise and criticism of Cuban leadership. There has been positive progress in Cuba in recent years, yet underlying problems remain (e.g. the economy lacks planning). The Bulgarian government devised the visit as an opportunity to teach the Cuban delegation about building state socialism. The report includes an overview of the Cuban delegations visit. Discussions during the visit involved Cuban economic growth and barriers, China, Romania’s non-interventionist policies, Nixon’s 1972 visit to Moscow, and economic and scientific cooperation (particularly between Bulgaria and Cuba).

  • July, 1972

    Information from Consultative Meeting about China July 3-5, 1972 on International Policy and Internal Situation of the People’s Republic of China (PRC) under Current Conditions

    A lengthy document that addresses several issues related to Communism and China. It covers such topics as Chinese foreign policy, Chinese and American relations, Maoism, Chinese policy regarding developing countries, capitalist countries and other socialist countries.