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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • September 04, 1930

    Imre Nagy’s OGPU (Unified State Political Directorate) Enlistment

    Certificate signed by Imre Nagy upon enlistment in the OGPU secret police (later the NKVD).

  • March 10, 1938

    Report on Imre Nagy’s Arrest by the NKVD (Commissariat of Internal Affairs)

    Matusov and Altman report on Nagy's arrest on 4/5 March 1938 and subsequent release on 8 March, and describe some of his work.

  • June, 1941

    Report from the People’s Committee of Internal Affairs to the Central Committee of the Hungarian Communist Party, about Agent 'Volodya' (Imre Nagy)

    Sverdlov provides a brief overview of agent "Volodya" (Imre Nagy) and his work.

  • June 13, 1953

    Transcript of Conversation between the Soviet Leadership and Hungarian Workers’ Party Delegation in Moscow

    Discussion of the reorganization of the Hungarian government and various reforms following Stalin's death.

  • July 01, 1953

    Letter from Beria to Malenkov, 1 July 1953

    Letter from Beria to Malenkov, 1 July 1953, taking blame for his inappropriate actions.

  • July 01, 1953

    Letter from Lavrentiy Beria to Georgii Malenkov Reflecting on the Events of Spring 1953 (Excerpt)

    Letter from Beria to Malenkov discussing the events which took place in East Germany in the spring of 1953. Beria also discusses his actions after Stalin's death, asking for the forgiveness of the CPSU CC Politburo.

  • October 23, 1956

    Working Notes from the Session of the CPSU CC Presidium on 23 October 1956

    The Presidium is updated on events unfolding in Budapest. Khrushchev favors deploying troops to quell the uprising. Mikoyan, alone in his dissent, advocates political measures followed by troops if necessary. Nagy’s capacity to control the situation is discussed, Presidium members assert the incongruities with Poland, and Khrushchev dispatches Mikoyan and Suslov to Budapest.

  • October 24, 1956

    Mikoyan-Suslov Report

    Mikoyan-Suslov Report on the situation in Budapest in October 1956 and talks with Nagy and Gero about the Hungarian party leadership

  • October 25, 1956

    Guidance for Radio Free Europe Broadcasts

    CIA/International Operations Division guidance for Radio Free Europe at the outset of the Hungarian Revolution calls for extensive use of President Eisenhower’s September 23 statement on maintaining the spirit of freedom and for caution in pre-judging Imre Nagy.

  • October 27, 1956

    Telegram from Soviet Politburo members Mikoyan and Suslov reporting on the situation in Hungary

    Mikoyan-Suslov Report on the situation in Hungary, appointments to the Hungarian government, and discussions with the Hungarian leaders.

  • October 28, 1956

    Telegram from the Budapest KGB Station concerning the latest developments in the city following the popular uprising

    The KGB station in Budapest reports on the ongoing crisis in Hungary. While some popular forces are considering stopping the fighting, others continue to disarm the state organs. The fighting dies down in Budapest and the Imre Nagy government is gaining legitimacy. American embassy officials were seen evacuating from the embassy.

  • October 30, 1956

    Cable from Italian Communist leader Togliatti on Imre Nagy's Hungary

    Cable from Togliatti to Soviet leadership expressing worries that Hungary under Nagy is moving in a reactionary direction that could damage unity of leadership of the Party

  • October 30, 1956

    Report from Politburo members Mikoyan and Suslov on the crisis in Hungary

    Mikoyan-Suslov Report on the deterioration of the political situation in Hungary. the report states that popular forces are taking over the radio station and the post office and that the Imre Nagy government does not want to use force against the uprising. Fearful of a strong reaction from the UN Security Council, Mikoyan and Suslov suggest that the Soviet leadership stop the inlux of Red Army units in Hungary for the time being.

  • October 31, 1956

    Draft telegram to Italian Communist Leader Palmiro Togliatti

    Draft telegram from the CPSU CC to Italian Communist Leader Palmiro Togliatti on the Soviet leadership's position on the situation in Hungary.

  • November 01, 1956

    Andropov Report, 1 November 1956

    Andropov reports that Imre Nagy has threatened a scandal and the resignation of the government if the Soviet Union continues to send troops into Hungary. In his meeting with Nagy, Andropov is told that Hungary is withdrawing from the Warsaw Pact and will further request a UN guarantee of Hungarian neutrality if Soviet troop movements into Hungary do not stop. The report notes that after the meeting the Hungarian government informed the Embassy of its decision to leave the Warsaw Pact.

  • November 01, 1956

    Bulgarian Military Intelligence Information on the Situation in Hungary and Poland

    This intelligence report discusses the domestic political developments in Poland after the ascent of Wladyslaw Gomulka to the top of the Polish United Workers' Party (PZPR).The events surrounding the Hungarian Revolution of 1956 are also mentioned.

  • November 01, 1956

    Working Notes from the Session of the CPSU CC Presidium on 1 November 1956

    At this session of the Presidium, Mikoyan argues that in the face of a universal demand for troop withdrawal the best option is to support the Hungarian government. Mikoyan promotes negotiations over force. The other members support the application of force to put down the uprising. Supporters of force refer to the necessity of keeping Hungary within the Soviet sphere and preventing the uprising from spreading to other Eastern European nations.

  • November 02, 1956

    Working Notes from the Session of the CPSU CC Presidium on 2 November 1956

    The CPSU CC Presidium is confronted with reports from Hungary of mass demonstrations, armed counterrevolutionary groups, and the support for Nagy by the opposition. The CC is told about the Hungarian decision to declare neutrality and the likely confrontation between Soviet and Hungarian troops should the former continue to advance toward Budapest. Also discussed is the split within the HWP and possible Soviet responses.

  • November 03, 1956

    Working Notes from the Session of the CPSU CC Presidium on 3 November 1956, with Participation by J. Kadar, F. Munnich, and I. Horvath

    Kadar argues that the source of mistakes in the past resulted from the monopoly that a handful of Hungarians had on relations with the Soviet Union. Rakosi is singled out as a source for previous difficulties. Kadar believes that forming a new revolutionary government is the only way to undermine the violence of the counterrevolution and prevent Nagy from acting as cover for such activities. To garner support amongst workers, Kadar argues that the new government must not be a Soviet puppet.

  • November 04, 1956

    Cable, N. Firiubin to Soviet Foreign Ministry

    In this coded telegram, the Soviet Ministry is informed of Imre Nagy’s location at the Yugolsav embassy in Budapest. Firiubin reports that the Yugoslavs are attempting to obtain a statement from Nagy in support of Kadar’s new government. Tito is noted as requesting that the Soviet government not repress communists who ‘did not immediately take the correct line’ during the uprising and that the Soviet government protect the Yugoslav embassy from potential attack.