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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • February 11, 1945

    Yalta Conference Agreement, Declaration of a Liberated Europe

    The text of the agreements reached at the Yalta (Crimea) Conference between President Roosevelt, Prime Minister Churchill and Generalissimo Stalin.

  • September 27, 1946

    Telegram from Nikolai Novikov, Soviet Ambassador to the US, to the Soviet Leadership

    Soviet Ambassador to the US, Nikolai Novikov, describes the advent of a more assertive US foreign policy. Novikov cautions the Soviet leadership that the Truman administration is bent on imposing US political, military and economic domination around the world. This telegram has, since its discovery in the Russian archives, been labelled the Soviet equivalent of US Ambassador to the Soviet Union George Kennan's "Long telegram."

  • March 12, 1947

    Truman Doctrine, 'Recommendations for Assistance to Greece and Turkey'

    Truman's speech to Congress in which he laid the foundations of the Truman Doctrine by stating that the United States would support Greece and Turkey in order to prevent them from under the sway of the Soviet Union. This speech is often cited as the beginning of the Cold War, and US containment policy.

  • June 27, 1950

    Statement by the President, Truman on Korea

    Truman's statement on the invasion of South Korea by North Korean forces.

  • June 17, 1953

    Report from A. Grechko and Tarasov to N.A. Bulganin, 9:30 p.m.

    Soviet forces continued to restore order in Berlin and other cities and towns of the German Democratic Republic. The following numbers of people took part in the demonstrations: up to 15,000 in Magdeburg, up to 1,500 in Brandenburg, up to 1,000 in Oranienburg and Werder, up to 1,000 in Jena, 1,000 in Gera, up to 1,000 in Soemmerda, up to 10,000 in Dresden, up to 2,000 in Leipzig, 20,000 in Goerlitz. According to Soviet data, by 9:00. p.m., Moscow time, 50 people were killed or wounded in Magdeburg during the restoration of order. Three Germans were killed and 17 wounded in Leipzig. There have been no losses on the Soviet forces' side.

  • December 22, 1971

    Summary of protocol on exchanges of informational experience between the interior ministries of the Soviet Union and Czechoslovak Republic to occur in 1972

    This document outlines methods to improve the exchange of informational experience between the Soviet Union and CSSR in 1972. Strategies to increase cooperation include the development and stabilization of friendly relations, the exchange of government publications and the organization of recreational activities between the two countries, among many other ways.

  • February 10, 1972

    Protocol on cooperation and joint action between the Soviet KGB and border guards and border troops of the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic regarding the inhibition of terroristic and hostile actions in international aviation

    The parties agree to exchange information regarding the assurance of safety in civil aviation and the prevention of terrorist and other hostile acts. Plans are laid to coordinate steps for ensuring safety in airports in the Soviet Union and the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic that are open for international flights and for flights between the two countries. All parties agree to exchange information on international, scientific and technical themes which interest the parties and raise the safety level of civil aviation transport.

  • February 10, 1972

    Protocol between the Interior Ministry of the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic and the Committee for State Security (KGB) of the Soviet Union regarding bilateral cooperation between state security organs

    This agreement elaborates ways to increase cooperation between the KGB and Czechoslovak Ministry of the Interior, including information sharing on the detection of hostile plots against either state, restraint of subversive activities, protection of governmental agents, oversight of border troops and preparation of cadres. Both parties agreed to provide recreational and bathing facilities for security staff and their family members.

  • July 14, 1972

    Record of discussion and text of coordination plan on operative technology from the summer of 1972 through 1974, reached by the Committee of State Security (KGB) of the USSR and the Czechoslovak Ministry of the Interior

    The KGB and head representative of operative technical services for the Czechoslovak Ministry of the Interior agreed to a plan to continue the exchange of scientific-technical information and samples of operative technology and to convene meetings of specialists on these topics. The text of the coordination plan of summer 1972 - 1974 follows, and categories governed by it include technical documents, photographs, criminology, confidential documents, radio electronics and photo optics.

  • April 04, 1973

    Protocol on exchanges of workers and publications between the interior ministries of the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics in 1973

    This agreement provides for workers from the governments of the CSSR and USSR to spend short amounts of time in the other's country for research purposes and to work with organizations in that country. It also outlines the exchange of various publications related to state security and criminology, giving their exact titles and the number of copies to be exchanged.

  • February 11, 1974

    Protocol on exchange of employees and information in the scientific, technical and security fields for the year 1974

    This protocol arranges for short visits between Czechoslovak and Soviet Interior Ministry experts, functionaries and scientists to visit the other's country in order obtain information on topics including physical and chemical research methods, infrared, spectrophotometry and chromatography technology and the use of science and technology in the military. Both parties agree to mutual consultations on questions relating to public security, the military and the shared border of the CSSR and USSR. Publications on security and criminology are listed by title and the number of copies to be exchanged is enumerated.

  • January 23, 1976

    Protocol on cooperation between the Interior Ministries of the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic and the Soviet Union in 1976

    This agreement provides for short visits of employees of the Czechoslovak and Soviet Interior Ministries to the other country in order to study and exchange information on a variety of topics, including informational systems, mechanized and automated systems of computational technology and criminology. Details on recreational visits for employees of the two Ministries and conference dates are also given. An exchange of publications is finalized, with the works listed by title and number of copies; these documents relate to security, criminology and statistics.

  • December 01, 1977

    Agreement between the Soviet KGB and Czechoslovak Ministry of the Interior from the summer of 1978 to 1980

    In order to combat the perceived threat of hostile, foreign special agents operating on Soviet and Czechoslovak territory, the two parties agree to centralize their efforts to ensure the security of the two countries. In order to counter the special agents of capitalist countries and preserve the security of state secrets, the two parties decide to exchange counter-intelligence activity on subversive activity in Czechoslovakia, the Soviet Union and other socialist states. The two parties agree to focus on citizens of capitalist countries such as the United States, England, France and other NATO member nations and citizens of the People's Republic of China and the German Democratic Republic in their intelligence efforts. Specifically, the parties agree to monitor citizens of these countries working in Czechoslovakia and the Soviet Union and people working for representative agencies of the aforementioned countries. Also being monitored are Czechoslovak and Soviet citizens returning from capitalist or developing countries, corresponding with people in capitalist countries and having an address in a capitalist country. In conclusion, the KGB and Czechoslovak Interior Ministry agree to regular, bilateral exchange of information on hostile residents of both countries who are thought to be in the employ of the special intelligence services of NATO countries and China.

  • December 05, 1977

    Cooperation agreement between the state security schools of the Soviet Union and Czechoslovak Socialist Republic

    The two schools agree to bilateral consultations regarding training content and internships for cadets and to share teaching materials, teachers, recorded lectures and film. Both educational institutions pledge to work together to determine a common plan for each school year. This agreement also mentions the Soviet Red Banner distinction.

  • March 22, 1979

    Protocol on cooperation between the Interior Ministries of the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic and the Soviet Union for the year 1979

    The two parties agree to worker, including Interior Ministry officials and university students, exchanges in the field of academia, law, politics, criminal investigation, fire-fighting, engineering, external relations, science and public safety. Provisions are made of the exchange of documents relating to criminology, public safety, the Soviet military, politics and fire-fighting techniques. Both parties agree to exchange information on thefts of shipments, detection and prevention of anti-state activity in border regions and the protection of public order.

  • October 23, 1981

    Cooperative Agreement between the Interior Ministry of the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic and the Soviet KGB for the summer of 1981 - 1985

    The two parties consent to assist each other in the surveillance of goods going between the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic and the Soviet Union, letters going between the two countries and from them to capitalist countries, correspondence sent from Czechoslovak or Soviet citizens to people who recently arrived from capitalist countries, the mailing of anti-socialist materials sent through the two nations and mail involving anti-socialist propaganda sent to either country from capitalist countries. Both parties also agree to exchange information on ways subversives use the post to their advantage and how each country’s officials monitor post suspected of containing ideologically injurious material.

  • September 02, 1983

    Agreement between the state border protection guards of the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic and the border troops of the Soviet KGB

    The two parties agree to exchange information on the general security situation in the border area of the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic and the Soviet Union and on the operational situation along the common state border.

  • November 14, 1984

    Protocol resulting from discussions between the Interior Ministry of the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic and the KGB of the Soviet Union

    Both parties discuss the detection of and preparation for a surprise nuclear rocket attack by the USA on socialist countries, the intentions of the main hostile countries- the USA, other NATO countries, the People’s Republic of China- and cooperation to fight ideological diversion from hostile countries and emigrant populations. The two also agree to economic, tourism and cultural exchanges.

  • April 24, 1985

    Address by Willy Brandt before the Council on Foreign Relations

    Willy Brandt speaks about East-West relations, specifically focusing on what he views as U.S. misconceptions about nuclear arms, and the concept of Common Security.

  • October 25, 1985

    Cooperative plan between the Interior Ministry of the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic and the Soviet KGB for the summer of 1986-1990

    This agreement acknowledges the alleged use of post as a method used by subversives to act against the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic and the Soviet Union. Both parties agree to exchange information after evaluating the effectiveness of their work in this area and plan to prolong the existing cooperative agreement.