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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • November 09, 1944

    Letter No. 402 from L.D. Wilgress, Canadian Embassy, Moscow, to the Secretary of State for External Affairs, W.L. Mackenzie King

    The Canadian Ambassador to the Soviet Union, L.D. Wilgress, thoroughly reviews Soviet foreign policy in Europe, Asia, and in Latin America and its relations with the United States and the United Kingdom. Wilgress optimistically concludes that "the Soviet Government are desirous of co-operating fully with the other great powers."

  • January 09, 1945

    Record of I. V. Stalin's Conversation with the Head of the Delegation of the National Liberation Committee of Yugoslavia, A. Hebrang

    Stalin and Hebrang discuss building armed forces in Yugoslavia, its territorial problems, and its relations with Bulgaria and Albania

  • January 10, 1945

    Notes of G. Dimitrov on a Phone Call from Stalin

    Stalin expresses his support for an equal Bulgarian-Yugoslav confederation; cautions the Yugoslav delegation against interfering in Greece.

  • April 06, 1945

    Record of Conversation Between V. M. Molotov and Minister of Foreign Affairs of Yugoslavia I. Ivan Šubašić

    Molotov and Ivan Šubašić discuss Yugoslavia's economic cooperation with the Allied Powers and its territorial problems.

  • May 27, 1946

    Yugoslav Record of Conversation of I.V. Stalin and the Yugoslav Government Delegation Headed by J. Broz Tito, 27-28 May 1946

    Stalin and Tito discuss economic cooperation between Yugoslavia and the Soviet Union. Stalin advises Tito about improving the Yugoslav army and defense program and discusses the Soviet Union providing assistance in this development.

  • May 27, 1946

    Soviet Record of Conversation of Gen. I.V. Stalin with Marshal Tito, 27-28 May 1946

    Stalin and Tito discuss the economic situation of Yugoslavia and a plan for the Soviet Union providing assistance for further industrial and military development. Yugoslav foreign relations are also discussed.

  • February 10, 1948

    Report of Milovan Djilas about a Secret Soviet-Bulgarian-Yugoslav Meeting

    Stalin calls a secret meeting with Soviet, Bulgarian, and Yugoslav officials regarding discrepancies and a general lack of coordination between the three governments in several recent incidences.

  • April 22, 1948

    Resolution on Yugoslavia of the Political Bureau of the Central Committee of the Romanian Workers' Party

    Resolution condemning recent anti-Soviet rhetoric in Yugoslavia.

  • June 23, 1949

    Yugoslav-Croatian Movements

    Information on Yugoslav and Croatian activities against the Tito government in Syria and Lebanon

  • January 01, 1953

    Soviet Plan to Assassinate Tito

    NKVD plan to assassinate Josip Broz Tito by a Soviet covert agent, codenamed “Max.” The plan envisions assassinating Tito during a private audience during Tito’s forthcoming visit to London, or at a diplomatic reception in Belgrade. This document was not dated.

  • May 27, 1953

    About the Situation in Yugoslavia and its Foreign Policy

    M. Zimianin reports to Molotov on the internal and foreign policy of Yugoslavia after breaking with the USSR.

  • January 21, 1954

    Report on the Reception of Yugoslavian Diplomat Vidic by Soviet Foreign Minister Vyacheslav Molotov

    Memorandum of conversation between Soviet Foreign Minister Molotov and Yugoslav Ambassador Vidic. Topics of discussion include Austrian-Yugoslav relations, and the current state of relations with the Soviet Union. This memorandum was written one year after the Tito-Stalin split, and the founding of Titoism.

  • June 22, 1954

    Letter from Nikita S. Khrushchev, First Secretary of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, to Josip Broz Tito and the Central Committee of the League of Communists Of Yugoslavia

    Letter from Soviet leader Nikita S. Khrushchev to Yugoslav leader Josep B. Tito suggesting that the time is ripe for a rapprochement between the two states and parties. Blaming former NKVD chief Lavrenty Beria and former Yugoslav leadership member Milovan Djilas for doing the work of the imperialists by attempting to drive a wedge between the Soviet and Yugoslav people and parties, Khrushchev suggests that the ousting of both will increase rapprochement between the two countries and be the catalyst for a a summit between the two leaders.

  • July 24, 1954

    Cable from the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union to Tito and Central Committee of the League Of Communists Of Yugoslavia

    Letter from the CC CPSU to the CC LCY regarding the positive response given the CC CPSU by the CC LCY concerning the 22 June 1954 Soviet letter to the Yugoslav leadership suggesting the possibility of Soviet-Yugoslav rapprochement. The Soviets also suggest that they support the Yugoslav position on the question of the city of Trieste, a disputed zone between the Yugoslavs and the Italians.

  • August 11, 1954

    Letter from Tito and the Executive Committee [Politburo] of the CC LCY to Nikita Khrushchev and Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union

    Yugoslav response to Soviet approaches about normalizing relations between the two countries and the two parties. While encouraged by the Soviet gestures, the Yugoslav leadership remains cautious and suggests that the rapprochement take a slow and steady course, taking into account the differences as well as the similarities between the two countries.

  • September 23, 1954

    Letter from Nikita Khrushchev, First Secretary of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, to Tito and the Executive Committee of the Central Committee of the League of Communists of Yugoslavia

    Nikita Khrushchev’s letter to Yugoslav leader Josip Broz Tito concerning the possibility of improving relations between the Soviet Union and Yugoslavia. The Soviet leader suggests that rapprochement between the USSR and Yugoslavia can only be accomplished if both parties continue the exchange of views regarding mutual non-interference in the internal affairs of the other country, peaceful coexistence, equality among parties, and world peace. Khrushchev goes on to suggest that a summit between party representatives should meet in order to further rapprochement.

  • September 27, 1954

    Letter from Nikita Khrushchev, First Secretary of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, to Tito and the Executive Committee of the Central Committee of the League of Communists of Yugoslavia

    The CC CPSU leadership letter of apology to the CC LCY for “an inappropriate formulation” that had escaped Soviet censors concerning the Yugoslav leadership in the second edition of the book Historical Materialism

  • October 21, 1954

    On Recent Yugoslav Foreign Policy (second half of 1954)

    Zimianin writes on Yugoslav foreign policy and Soviet-Yugoslav foreign relations.

  • June 30, 1955

    Conversation of Mao Zedong and the Yugoslav Ambassador V. Popovic

    Conversation between Mao Zedong and Yugoslav Ambassador Popovic. Mao explains that the delay in China's recognition of Yugoslavia was because China was waiting for Yugoslavia and the USSR to mend their relations. Emphasizes the need for Communist unity and cooperation.

  • July 09, 1955

    Central Committee Plenum of the CPSU Ninth Session, Evening

    The situation in Yugoslavia is discussed, in terms of keeping Yugoslavia in close relations with the USSR and reducing its political and economic dependence on capitalist countries.