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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • February 11, 1945

    Yalta Conference Agreement, Declaration of a Liberated Europe

    The text of the agreements reached at the Yalta (Crimea) Conference between President Roosevelt, Prime Minister Churchill and Generalissimo Stalin.

  • September 27, 1946

    Telegram from Nikolai Novikov, Soviet Ambassador to the US, to the Soviet Leadership

    Soviet Ambassador to the US, Nikolai Novikov, describes the advent of a more assertive US foreign policy. Novikov cautions the Soviet leadership that the Truman administration is bent on imposing US political, military and economic domination around the world. This telegram has, since its discovery in the Russian archives, been labelled the Soviet equivalent of US Ambassador to the Soviet Union George Kennan's "Long telegram."

  • October 27, 1946

    Cable Nos. 97-98, Molotov to Druzhkov [Stalin]

    A cable discussing Molotov's intention to give a speech at the UN about veto powers, atom bombs, and arm reductions. He will offer a proposal from the Soviet delegation calling for universal arms reductions, a ban on the use of atomic energy for warlike aims, and efforts towards global peace and security.

  • November 26, 1946

    Incoming Cable No. 2151, Druzhkov [Stalin] to Cde. Molotov

    Stalin agrees to Molotov's additional points on mutual arms reduction. Proposes creating under the UNSC a special inspection organ. To do this the following shall be created: control commissions on the fulfillment of the arms reduction agreement and militarized nuclear energy. The former should be temporary, the latter permanent, but they shouldn't highlight that the former is only temporary.

  • December 02, 1946

    Cable Nos. 509-511, Molotov to Druzhkov [Stalin]

    A copy of the draft resolution submitted by the United States to the UN, regarding arms reduction. Molotov thinks that this draft may be taken as a basis with the introduction of some changes he plans to report at a later time.

  • December 02, 1946

    Cable Nos. 512-515, Molotov to Druzhkov [Stalin]

    An outline of the Soviet Union's proposed changes to the USA's draft proposal for arms reduction (submitted to the UN).

  • December 03, 1946

    Incoming Cable No. 2209, Druzhkov [Stalin] to Cde. Molotov

    Stalin approves of the American draft for arms control as a basis, but instructs Molotov to insist on specific wording for certain points. He also does not recommend introducing any addendums as he believes they will fail.

  • December 19, 1946

    Telegram, Gromyko to Cde. Dekanozov

    A copy of a report to be submitted to the Security Council, detailing a commission's conclusions and recommendations for future control of atomic energy.

  • October 17, 1947

    George C. Marshall, 'A Program for a More Effective United Nations: Address by the Chief of the U.S. Delegation to the General Assembly'

    Marshall speaks about Greece, Palestine, and Korea, as well as the international control of atomic energy and the role and structure of the United Nations.

  • September 18, 1947

    Text of Speech Delivered by A.Y. Vyshinsky at the General Assembly of the United Nations, September 18, 1947

    The Soviet Union's response to George Marshall's September 17, 1947, speech at the UNGA. Vyshinsky offers the Soviet Union's position on arms control, nuclear weapons, the UN, Korea, Greece, and other issues raised by Marshall

  • December 25, 1951

    Memorandum from Gromyko to Razuvaev

    Gromyko suggests to Stalin, via Razuvaev, to turn down Vyshinsky’s proposal for publishing a communiqué about the American position in the armistice talks.

  • April 05, 1952

    Record of the Conversation of I.V. Stalin and Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan

    Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan and Stalin discuss India's internal politics and stance on foreign policy. Radhakrishnan tells Stalin of India's recent elections and emphasizes that India shares the Soviet Union's stance against capitalism. Radhakrishna also puts forth the question of peaceful co-existence between capitalist and communist spheres, and the possibility for a neutral commission to replace the Cominform and UN. Stalin expresses doubt.

  • September 14, 1952

    Report, Zhou Enlai to the Chairman [Mao Zedong]

    Zhou and Stalin discuss the Korean War POW issue as well as the United Nations.

  • September 16, 1952

    Report, Zhou Enlai to the Chairman [Mao Zedong] and the Central Committee

    Zhou Enlai updates Mao Zedong on the latest conversations with Stalin and other members of the Soviet leadership. Topics of discussion included Soviet technical assistance to China, developments in the Korean War, the United Nations, and the formation of a regional organization for Asia.

  • September 22, 1952

    Report, Zhou Enlai to the Chairman [Mao Zedong] and the Central Committee

    Zhou and Stalin discuss the POW issue, the United Nations and the formation of a new regional organization for Asia, and military cooperation.

  • July 27, 1953

    Notes on Visit of General Clark with President Rhee (8:30-8:55, 27 July 1953)

    General Clark tries to convince President Rhee to attend the armistice signing, emphasizing that Kim Il Sung will not be present. Ambassador Briggs then reports that President Eisenhower has approved $200 million in aid for Korean rehabilitation.

  • January 15, 1954

    Report, Legation of the Hungarian People’s Republic in Beijing to the Foreign Ministry of Hungary

    Report from the Hungarian Chargé d’Affaires in Beijing which talks about the dispute between China, North Korea and the US over POW's. The report also speculates on the reason for India's position on this issue.

  • April 15, 1954

    The Question of a Conference of the Five Great Powers with the Participation of the PRC

    At a conference of the Ministers of Foreign Affairs of the USSR, US, Britain and France, the USSR proposes a conference including the PRC, but the others oppose China's participation.

  • June 04, 1954

    Telegram, Zhou Enlai to Mao Zedong and Others, Regarding the Situation at the Eleventh Restricted Session

    Zhou reports on the eleventh restricted session on Indochina. During the session, Zhou opposes using the UN as a supervisory body, and asserts that the joint commission should take major responsibility in implementing the armistice, and that the NNSC's function is to supervise the joint commission's work and the Indochina borders.

  • January 06, 1955

    Record of Meetings between UN Secretary-General Dag Hammarskjold and Zhou Enlai

    Over a series of four meetings, Secretary-General Hammarskjold and Zhou Enlai discuss American prisoners in China, Chinese nationals in the US, and the US-Taiwan defense treaty.