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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • July 01, 1947

    Cipher Telegram from G. Dimitrov to J. Stalin on Damyan Velchev’s Behavior in Switzerland

    Report on the activities of the former Defense Minister and Chief of the Bulgarian mission in Bern, Damyan Velchev, against the new Bulgarian regime.

  • May 23, 1949

    Cipher Telegrams Regarding Bulgarian Request to Sending Soviet investigators to Sofia

    Stalin and Molotov approve a BCP CC request for the dispatch of Soviet investigators to assist in Kiril Slavkov’s trial

  • May 06, 1953

    Memorandum from Lavrentiy Beria to the CPSU CC Presidium regarding Mass Defections from the GDR, 6 May 1953

    Excerpt of a memorandum from Lavrentiy Beria to the CPSU CC Presidium regarding mass defections from the GDR. By early May 1953, declining conditions in the GDR finally started to draw the attention of the Soviet leadership. Lavrentiy Beria’s 6 May report to the CPSU Presidium is one of the first high-level documents to reflect concerns about the situation, in particular the increased flight of farmers and small businessmen brought about by the forced socialization policy. Beria may have been prompted to submit this report by the discussion of the German issue at a CPSU Presidium meeting on 5 May.

  • June 17, 1953

    Report from A. Grechko and Tarasov to N.A. Bulganin, 9:30 p.m.

    Soviet forces continued to restore order in Berlin and other cities and towns of the German Democratic Republic. The following numbers of people took part in the demonstrations: up to 15,000 in Magdeburg, up to 1,500 in Brandenburg, up to 1,000 in Oranienburg and Werder, up to 1,000 in Jena, 1,000 in Gera, up to 1,000 in Soemmerda, up to 10,000 in Dresden, up to 2,000 in Leipzig, 20,000 in Goerlitz. According to Soviet data, by 9:00. p.m., Moscow time, 50 people were killed or wounded in Magdeburg during the restoration of order. Three Germans were killed and 17 wounded in Leipzig. There have been no losses on the Soviet forces' side.

  • March 23, 1967

    Bulgarian State Security Chairman Angel Solakov’s Report at a Bulgarian Communist Party Plenum

    According to the State Security Committee chair, Angel Solakov, there has been a major shift in the policies of the West towards the Soviet bloc. While during the 1950s military face-off was often considered an option, in the late 1960s such possibility has been largely ruled out. Consequently the US and their allies in Western Europe are focusing their efforts on fighting socialism around the world through peaceful means, such as strengthening economic and cultural ties with the Soviet bloc countries. This calls for a change in the strategy of the State Security Committee intelligence operations. Solakov also reports on the anti-Soviet activities of the Chinese and Albanian intelligence services across Europe.

  • February 19, 1973

    Information from Bulgaria on the Dismissal of Charges Against Army Officers for Anti-Party and Anti-State Activity

    Information regarding the reaction of a group of 16 Bulgarian Armed Forces officers, discharged for “anti-party and anti-state activity”. Some of them were rehabilitated with a CC BCP Secretariat Resolution “B-9” on October 13, 1972. The BCP CC’s Military Department recommends that the State Security Committee’s Sixth Directorate continue monitoring the group. KDS should also brief regularly the BCP CC about the behavior of those former officers who have not yet been rehabilitated. While those with favorable disposition towards the Party line should be recommended for future rehabilitation, others who are still standing on “anti-party” positions must be warned in the course.

  • June 05, 1974

    Report from D. Stoyanov to T. Zhivkov on Strengthening of the Bulgarian Border with Yugoslavia

    The Minister of Internal Affairs, Dimitar Stoyanov, reports on the security situation along Yugoslav-Bulgarian border. Since that border is the one most often used by defectors, the Minister proposes a 50% increase in the border patrol troops.

  • June 04, 1976

    Agreement between the Czechoslovak and Soviet Ministries of the Interior on cooperation from the summer of 1976 until 1980

    This plan focuses on developing and strengthening bilateral ties between the two countries in the areas of science, technology, security operations and criminology. It also calls for the sharing of best practices of propaganda methods, roadway security and oversight, education of government officials and administrative organization of bureaus such as the Ministry of the Interior. Provisions are made to exchange methods designed to improve the systems of permit, passport and visa issuance and registration of aliens. The sharing of best practices to reduce alcohol abuse, vagrancy, recidivism and youth crime is discussed as well.

  • March 04, 1977

    Cooperative agreement between the Soviet KGB and Czechoslovak Ministry of the Interior for the year 1977

    The Soviet KGB and Czechoslovak Interior Ministry agree to the exchange of workers between the two countries. These exchanges would focus on the sharing of information and expertise in various areas, including: identification procedures for unidentified bodies, security measures for capital regions, fire-fighting methods and ways to combat subversive activity in youth and teenagers. The two parties also agree to the exchange of publications on the Soviet military, security and criminology, which are listed by title and number of copies.

  • November 26, 1980

    Letter from Honecker to Brezhnev

    East German leader Erik Honecker writes to Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev requesting that a meeting of the First Secretaries of the Communist Parties in the Warsaw Pact member states be convened to discuss the crisis in Poland. Honecker suggests that any delay in taking action agains the "reactionary forces" would result in the demise of communism in Poland.

  • February 09, 1987

    Weekly Bulgarian State Security Review

    Based on intelligence sources, the Minister of Internal Affairs Dimitar Stoyanov reports on domestic political developments. Among the issues covered in the memo are the domestic repercussions of the January 1987 Plenary Session of the CPSU Central Committee, as well as the Western allegations of human rights violations in regard to Bulgaria’s policy toward the Turkish ethnic minority.

  • April 24, 1987

    Information from D. Stoyanov to M. Balev on Propaganda Against People's Republic of Bulgaria

    The Minister of Internal Affairs, Dimitar Stoyanov, reports on the coverage in the Western media of the alleged repressions against six Bulgarian dissidents who sent an open letter to the 1986 CSCE Meeting in Vienna. The letter claimed that Bulgaria does not comply fully with the Helsinki Accords on Human Rights of 1975. The Minister reports that although some measures have been taken to neutralize the activities of this particular dissident group, the official investigation has been suspended as there was a risk of further tarnishing Bulgaria’s image abroad.

  • October 13, 1987

    Information from D. Stoyanov to G. Yordanov on Discontent Among Sofia University Employers and Professors

    The Minister of Internal Affairs, Dimitar Stoyanov, informs the Education Minister, Georgi Yordanov, about intelligence reports regarding the rise of discontent among professors, employees and students at the University of Sofia.

  • June 20, 1988

    Weekly State Security Review from the Ministry of the Interior to T. Zhivkov

    The Minister of the Internal Affairs, Dimitar Stoyanov, briefs Todor Zhivkov on the weekly domestic developments. Among the most pressing issues is the ongoing popular discontent in Ruse triggered by the unresolved problems with industrial pollution in the city. Another issue is the opposition of the Turkish minority to the revival process.

  • March 23, 1989

    Bulgarian Secretariat Resolution on Termination of Jamming of Foreign Broadcasts for Bulgaria

    The BCP CC passes a decision to stop jamming the broadcast of Western radio stations airing programs in Bulgarian. This decision however does not apply to Radio Ankara, whose Bulgarian programming continues to be blocked.

  • June 13, 1989

    Excerpts from the Opening Full Session of the Hungarian National Roundtable Negotiations

    Transcribed from previously unpublished video recordings, these discussions point to the unwritten "rules" of mutual civility that arose in the nonviolent dissident movements and found an echo among the Communist reformers during the negotiated revolutions of 1989. For example, Dr. Istvan Kukorelli from the Patriotic People’s Front proposes to "refrain from questioning the legitimacy of each other, since the legitimacy of all of us is debatable. It is a question which belongs to the future - who will be given credit by history and who will be forgotten."

  • November 18, 1989

    Cable from US Embassy in Prague on Czech Demonstrations

    The US embassy in Prague reports on the brutal suppression of the Czech students' demonstration.

  • November 20, 1989

    Cable from US Embassy in Prague on Czech Demonstrations

    Cable from the US embassy in Prague reports on an American woman's account of the November 17 demonstrations and the death of a Czech student.

  • November 20, 1989

    Cable from US Embassy in Prague on Czech Demonstrations

    Cable from the US embassy in Prague reporting on the establishment of a new organization for Czech independents, the "Civic Forum," and the publication of a list of demands.

  • November 20, 1989

    Cable from US Embassy in Prague on Czech Demonstrations

    Cable from the US embassy in Prague reporting on contradictions in the Czechoslovak press coverage of the demonstrations' aftermath.