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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • 1950

    Telegram from Gromyko to Stalin with a Resolution and Approved Telegram to Razuvaev

    Gromyko goes over the rules established in the Geneva Conference.

  • March 14, 1953

    Ciphered Telegram from Razuvaev to Kim Il Sung and Peng Dehuai

    Telegram from Razuvaev discussing POWs and what precedents established at the Geneva Conference must be met. Razuvaev also asks whether their side is ready for immediate repatriation of seriously ill and seriously wounded prisoners of UN troops.

  • February 26, 1954

    Cable from the Communist Party of the Soviet Union Central Committee to CCP Central Committee, via Comrade Yudin

    Comrade Pavel Yudin asks the CCP to inform Comrade Ho Chi Minh that the discussion at the upcoming conference in Geneva will include the Korea question and restoring peace in Indochina.

  • March 04, 1954

    Letter, President Syngman Rhee to General Van Fleet

    President Rhee once again suggests that the US government should increase the ROK defense forces. It will not only be cheaper to fund Korean (over American) divisions, it also means that Americans do not need to fight in Korea. Rhee then negotiates that if the US government implements the necessary military buildup aid, he too will not take any “unilateral action” for or against the future Geneva Conference until after it has been in session. Finally, Rhee advocates his disapproval of US interest to build up Japan.

  • March 06, 1954

    Cable from Zhang Wentian, 'Reporting the Preliminary Opinions of Our Side on the Geneva Conference to the Soviet Side'

    Zhang Wentian discusses his visit with Molotov. During this meeting, Molotov says delegations from China, Korea, and Vietnam are welcome to Moscow before the Geneva conference to discuss its proceedings. Molotov also mentions several issues that still need to be discussed, such as relaxing tensions in Asia, Korean unification, ministers in attendance at the conference, and India's participation in the Indochina discussion.

  • March 06, 1954

    From the Journal of Molotov: Secret Memorandum of Conversation between Molotov and PRC Ambassador Zhang Wentian

    Soviet Foreign Minister Molotov and PRC Ambassador to the USSR Zhang Wentian discuss their respective views on the situations in Korea and Vietnam in preparation for the upcoming Geneva Conference.

  • March 11, 1954

    Telegram, Zhou Enlai to Ho Chi Minh (excerpt)

    Telegram from Zhou Enlai to Ho Chi Minh encouraging him to send a delegation to attend the Geneva Conference. According to Zhou Enlai important decisions will be made in Geneva, including decision on where the boundaries will be drawn in Vietnam.

  • March 12, 1954

    Report, Embassy of Hungary in North Korea to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    Report from Károly Pásztor, Hungarian envoy to the DPRK, regarding a conversation he had with Soviet Ambassador Suzdalev. He discusses the difficulties which would be involved in achieving Korean unification.

  • March 18, 1954

    Letter, Syngman Rhee to General James A. Van Fleet

    President Rhee discusses different tactics with General Van Fleet on how to convince President Eisenhower and the American public to build the ROK's armed forces.

  • April 20, 1954

    Transcript, Zhou Enlai's presentation at the meeting of members of the Chinese delegation attending the Geneva Conference (excerpt), 5:00 a.m.

    In his presentation Zhou Enlai is encourages fellow communist countries who are to participate in the Geneva Conference to work together and perform well on the international stage.

  • April 26, 1954

    Cable from Zhou Enlai, 'Regarding Speeches at the Conference and the Situation at the First Plenary Session'

    Zhou Enlai reports on some last minute agreements regarding the conference procedures. It is decided that the Korean delegation will speak first, and that Thailand, Britain, and the Soviet Union will take turns chairing the conference.

  • April 28, 1954

    Telegram, Zhou Enlai to Mao Zedong, Liu Shaoqi, and CCP Central Committee (excerpt)

    In his telegram, Zhou Enlai informs Mao Zedong, Liu Shaoqi, and CCP Central Committee about the first days of the Geneva Conference. Discussion on the Korea question has already entered a deadlock and it seems that the Chinese, French, and Russian delegations have arranged to meet outside the conference to discuss Indochina.

  • May 03, 1954

    Memorandum of Conversation between Deputy Foreign Minister Zhang Hanfu and Indian Ambassador to China Raghavan Concerning Premier Nehru’s Statement on the Hydrogen Bomb

    Zhang Hanfu and Raghavan discuss the hydrogen bomb and the Colombo Conference.

  • May 09, 1954

    Cable from Zhou Enlai, 'Regarding the Situation of the First Plenary Session'

    Zhou Enlai recaps the Indochina discussion that took place at the Geneva conference. Participants discussed a ceasefire, and supervision by an international committee. Enlai notes that his suggestion to invite the resistance governments in Laos and Cambodia to attend the conference produced debate.

  • May 12, 1954

    Telegram, Zhou Enlai to Mao Zedong and Others, Regarding the Second Plenary Session (Excerpt)

    Zhou Enlai reports mainly on the second session of the Indochina issue. Participants are divided on the issue of a ceasefire. The Republic of Vietnam's Pham Van Dong agrees that the releasing of sick and wounded POWs will include both French and Vietnamese troops.

  • May 14, 1954

    Telegram, Zhou Enlai to Mao Zedong and Others, Regarding the Situation at the Tenth Plenary Session

    Zhou Enlai reports on Eden's proposals at the tenth session on Korea. Eden focuses on elections based on the population distributions in North and South Korea, international supervision, and foreign troop withdrawal.

  • May 14, 1954

    Minutes of Conversation between Zhou Enlai and Anthony Eden

    Zhou Enlai and Anthony Eden discuss Geneva Conference proceedings related to the Korea and Indochina issues. Zhou expresses concerns for the French proposal on Indochina and states that China supports the North Vietnamese proposal. Zhou and Eden agree that a military armistice should be decided on, although they disagree on specific issues surrounding an armistice.

  • May 15, 1954

    Telegram, Zhou Enlai to Mao Zedong and Others, Requesting Instructions on the Korean Issue and Regarding the Situation at the Fourth Plenary Session on the Indochina Issue

    Zhou Enlai reports to the CCP on his meeting with Anthony Eden, the fourth plenary session on Indochina, and his meeting with the Soviet and Korean representatives. During the fourth session, representatives from Russia and France spoke on their positions on the armistice in Indochina.

  • May 19, 1954

    Telegram, Zhou Enlai to Mao Zedong and Others, Regarding the Second Restricted Session

    Zhou Enlai reports to the CCP on the second restricted session on Indochina and propaganda efforts of the Chinese and Russians. During the Indochina session, the US, France, and Britain disagreed with China, Russia, and the DRV on whether or not the Laos and Cambodia issues should be discussed separately from the Vietnam issues.

  • May 20, 1954

    Telegram, Zhou Enlai to Mao Zedong and Others, Regarding the Situation at the Third Restricted Session

    Zhou Enlai reports on the continued session on Indochina. Again, the participants are divided in their opinions and nothing is achieved. All agree to continue the discussion another day. Also, Zhou prepares to take the lead in the session on Korea.