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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • May 24, 1953

    Sample Plan for the Draft Response to the Notes of the Three Powers

    Unhappy with the call for a conference in Lugano, this plan outlines several points that should be taken into consideration when drafting the official response including the Soviet awareness that any lack of results from this conference would result in blame being placed on the Soviet state and the dismissal of questions raised by the Soviet government in prior correspondence. The Soviets conclude that they should arrange the program of the conference in order to maximize the conferences effectiveness in resolving lingering post-war problems.

  • March 22, 1957

    Memorandum from the Soviet Government to the Chinese Government on the Arms Reduction Issue

    A memorandum from the Soviet government to the Chinese updating them on the arms reduction talks, a key component of which was a prohibition of the testing of atomic and hydrogen weapons. The Soviet proposal also called for reductions in conventional weapons and the prohibition of installing nuclear weapons outside their territorial borders.

  • March 28, 1958

    Conversation of Mao Zedong with Soviet Ambassador Pavel Yudin (Excerpt)

    In a conversation with Soviet ambassador Yudin, Mao sees a prohibition of the use of hydrogen weapons as very likely, as the capitalist countries "[fear] fighting this kind of war." Further, he notes that the socialist countries have an advantage over Western ones in terms of conventional army size.

  • November, 1963

    Ion Gheorghe Maurer, 'The Unshakeable Foundation of the Unity of the International Communist Movement' (excerpts)

    Prime Minister Ion Gheorghe Maurer describes Romania's new policies and approach to relations with China and the Soviet Union at a time when Romania was increasingly attempting to distance itself from the Warsaw Pact and the Soviet Union's military control. Toward this end, Mauer proclaims a policy of military disengagement and disarmament, declaring that mediation and negotiation are the only legitimate way of resolving international tensions.

  • May 13, 1975

    Record of Conversation between French President Giscard d'Estaing and Vice Premier of the People's Republic Deng Xiaoping: First Meeting

    French President Giscard and Vice Premier Deng Xiaoping discuss the current international situation, including the balance of power between the Soviet Union and the United States and issues of European unity and security. They also discuss the current situation in Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos following the fall of Saigon and the end of the Vietnam War.

  • November 23, 1976

    United States Information Service, 'United States Statement on UN Vote on South Africa'

    US statement to the UN General Assembly delivered by delegate Father Hupp. The statement explains the why the US voted no on a series of resolutions regarding South Africa. These included resolutions on an arms embargo, sporting boycott and other resolutions concerning Apartheid. It also voted no on a resolution condemning Israel for arms sales to South Africa.

  • June 02, 1977

    Letter, South African Ambassador to the United States, 'US Policy on Foreign Military Sales'

    The South African Ambassador to the United States analyzes the new arms control policies under the Carter Administration.

  • December 19, 1979

    Letter by the Chairman of the SPD, Brandt, to President of Romania, Ceausescu

    A letter from Willy Brandt to Nicolae Ceausescu. He offers congratulations for Ceausescu's recent reelection and addresses the topic of arms control.

  • February 22, 1982

    Letter by the General Secretary of the CC of the CPSU, Gorbachev, to the Chairman of the SPD, Brandt

    Leonid Brezhnev writes to Willy Brandt about ongoing US-Soviet arms negotiations.

  • 1983

    Disarmament: Who's Against?

    Soviet military pamphlet discussing what it sees as the two different approaches to nuclear and conventional arms limitation between the U.S. and the Soviet Union. Argues that while the Soviet Union works for constructive talks, the U.S. obstructs agreements and uses propaganda rhetoric to disguise its true aggression. Translated for publication from the Russian text, "Razoruzhenie, kto protiv?"

  • January 31, 1983

    Information on the Results of the Second Round of Soviet-American Negotations on the Limitation and Reduction of Strategic Armaments

    Report on negotiations between the Soviet Union and the United States for the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START) to reduce the number of intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) launchers, submarine-launched ballistic missiles (SLBMs), and heavy bombers used by each side.

  • May 28, 1983

    CC CPSU on Withdrawal from Strategic Arms Reduction Negotiations (1)

    The CC CPSU announces that it is breaking off negotiations with the US and NATO on Strategic Arms Reduction.

  • May 28, 1983

    CC CPSU on Withdrawal from Strategic Arms Reduction Negotiations (2)

    The CC CPSU announces that it is breaking off negotiations with the US and NATO on Strategic Arms Reduction.

  • November 16, 1983

    Antonio Badini, Outline of General Considerations

    A memo to Italian Prime Minister Bettino Craxi from his Diplomatic Counselor Antonio Badini. Badini warns against the latest Soviet proposals. He suggests that agreeing to them without making any concessions regarding the deployment of American missiles would be tantamount to the realization of a long term goal of the Soviet Union, i.e. the decoupling between the Western European and the American defense system. […] He writes that the Soviet proposals “can be taken as a possible basis for an agreement is surprising. We can only hope that this fact does not imply that, from a political and psychological standpoint, the process of Finlandization of Europe is far more advanced than we believed thus far.”

  • 1984

    Arms Freeze: Who Is For and Who Is Against

    Pamphlet by the Soviet Novosti Press Agency arguing for the U.S. government to accept a mutual proposal to freeze American and Soviet nuclear arms production. Argues that this would lead to an improved political atmosphere and nuclear arms reductions in the future. Translated for publication from the Russian text, "Zamorazhivanie, kto za i kto protiv."

  • September 04, 1985

    Letter by the Chairman of the SPD, Brandt, to the General Secretary of the CC of the CPSU, Gorbachev

    Brandt shares his opinion with Gorbachev, that a constructive American reply to the Soviet moratorium can be, materially and psychologically, a first important step toward curtailing the arms race and toward a reasonable relationship for the two world powers.

  • December 12, 1985

    Memorandum by Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 'FNI negotiations - Assessments of the American negotiator, Ambassador Glitman'

    A brief report by US Ambassador Glitman regarding the INF negotiations with the USSR. There is an increased willingness to negotiate, and the parties have come closer in some aspects, but major differences still persist.

  • February 26, 1986

    Memorandum by Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 'NATO Secretary General's visit in Rome (26th-28th February 1986) - Analysis of the prospects of Geneva negotiations and of the negotiations about disarmament'

    A comprehensive analysis of the Soviet position in the upcoming disarmament negotiations regarding SDI, FNI, MBFR, and chemical weapons. Overall, there seems to be increased willingness on the Soviet side to free up economic resources from military sector.

  • February 26, 1986

    Memorandum by Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 'NATO Secretary General's visit in Rome (26th-28th February 1986). Security and disarmament'

    This document summarizes Ambassador Nitze's speech on the issue of security and disarmament, and provides a rather detailed description of current U.S. position vis-à-vis the USSR in the field of disarmament and global security.

  • May 26, 1986

    Letter from President Reagan to Prime Minister Bettino Craxi

    Unofficial translation of correspondence between PM Craxi and President Reagan regarding strategic arms limitations and deterrence. Reagan outlines the planned US measures given lack of effort and willingness by the USSR to arrive to a binding agreement.