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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • July 06, 1949

    Report, Kovalev to Stalin

    Kovalev relays several requests made by Liu Shaoqi, Gao Gang, and Wang Jiaxiang. The requests include advice on running a communist government, that Soviet professors be sent to China, advice on how to manage Manchuria, and if China could receive a Czechoslovak trade delegation.

  • January 17, 1956

    Letter, V. Akshinskii, Deputy Secretary at the Soviet Embassy to China, Regarding the Behavior of Soviet and Czech Specialists in China

    USSR ambassador on the freely and offending conduct toward the Chinese people of the Czech specialists employed with their Soviet counterparts in Shanghai.

  • November 09, 1957

    Addition to Memorandum of Conversation between Czechoslovak Parliamentary Delegation and Mao Zedong, 29 September 1957

    The Head of the Czechoslovak delegation and Mao Zedong agree that relations between the CSSR, PRC, and USSR are politically strong but require economic improvement, according to Khrushchev. Mao discusses the socialist revolution and its varying levels of support in China amongst the different demographics within the Chinese social structure. Mao also discusses the three basic goals which guide Chinese foreign policy.

  • December 21, 1957

    Memorandum of Conversation with the Chairman of the Shanghai Office of the Energy Construction Industry, Zheng Toshen, at the residence of the General Consul of the CSSR

    Discussion of a Czechoslovak expert, Oldřich Havlíček, who was working in China as Coordinator of Construction at an energy plant in Shanghai. Havlíček was sent home after he had an affair with a married Chinese woman, Ms. Zhen. The Czechoslovak authorities become involved when Ms. Zhen's husband sends letters of complaint to the CSSR ambassador in Beijing, the CSSR general consul in Shanghai, and to the People’s Court in Shanghai.

  • June 02, 1961

    Vice Premier Li Xiannian Meets Czechoslovak Ambassador to China Josef Sedivy to Discuss the Issue of This Years’ Sino-Czechoslovak Trade Negotiations

    Li Xiannian describes the difficulties facing China in the wake of the "disaster" and its inability to meet trade obligations with other socialist countries.

  • November 27, 1961

    Cable from the Foreign Ministry, 'Notice regarding the Appropriate Response to the Czechoslovak Premier’s Attack on Our Party'

    The Chinese Ministry of Foreign Affairs weighs how to respond to Czechoslovak criticisms of Mao Zedong's cult of personality following the 20th Congress of the CPSU.

  • April 30, 1963

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Czechoslovakia, 'Several Noteworthy Signs in Czechoslovakia'

    Zhong Xidong believes that "Czechoslovakia’s situation is in the midst of changes."

  • December 03, 1964

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Czechoslovakia to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 'Our Contacts with Middle- and Lower-Level Personnel'

    The Chinese Embassy in Czechoslovakia reports that "people were willing to talk with us and listen to our opinions" since Khrushchev's fall from power.

  • May 16, 1965

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Poland to International Liaison Department and Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 'A Few Polish and Czech Reactions to Our Second Nuclear Bomb Test Explosion'

    The Chinese Embassy in Poland assesses the responses to the Chinese nuclear test among socialist countries in Eastern Europe.

  • May 29, 1965

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Reactions to China's Second Nuclear Test'

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry to Chinese Embassies noting foreign countries' responses to China's second nuclear test.

  • 1967

    CSSR Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 'Information: The Most Recent Developments in the Chinese People’s Republic and the CSSR-Chinese Relations'

    Extensive account of CSSR-Chinese relations, including controversy surrounding the Cultural Revolution and Chinese extremism, anti-Soviet proclivities within the Chinese leadership, and the Chinese hydrogen bomb test on June 17th.

  • February 09, 1967

    Note from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic to the Embassy of the People's Republic of China in Prague

    The Czech Ministry of Foreign Affairs condemns Chinese authorities responsible for threats to the Czech Embassy in Peking, including the forceful holding of the ambassador of the CSSR and other officials and the tearing of the flag.

  • October 09, 1967

    CSSR Ministry of Foreign Affairs No. No. 026.235/67-3, 'Information about Most Recent Measures against the Activities of the Representative Office of the Chinese People’s Republic'

    Account of measures taken in response to provocative activities of the CPR (threats, propaganda, restrictions on freedom of movement, etc) and objectives in pursuing these responses.

  • May 06, 1968

    Cable from the CSSR Embassy, Peking, 'Thesis and Proposals for the Development of an Action Plan of the Communist Party and Government of Czechoslovakia regarding the Relations between Czechoslovakia and Chinese People’s Republic'

    Proposals for Communist Party action regarding the CPR activity, including overall objectives in the CSSR-PRC relationship, general foreign policy outlook, and specific measures like fighting against the theory of "two Chinas."

  • July 08, 1968

    Political Report No.12 from the Embassy of the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic, Peking

    Account addressed to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs regarding gradual normalization of communications and relations with China, including conclusions and recommendations for future policy like removal of limits on free movement by the Chinese representative office in Prague.

  • July 14, 1968

    Message of the SSSR Ministry of Foreign Affairs to the Soviet Embassy in Poland regarding the Reaction of Some Communist Parties to the Information from the Central Committee of CPSSS of July 11 about the Situation in Czechoslovakia

    Romania warns against international intervention, while Bulgarian officials argue that Romania's argument disavows the Warsaw agreement. Urbany closes by recommending peaceful and, if need be, other means to prevent upheaval.

  • September 03, 1968

    Note Number 291 from the Department of Asia-Oceania, 'China and the Events in Czechoslovakia'

    The Department of Asia-Oceania analyzes shifts in Chinese foreign policy toward Eastern Europe following the Warsaw Pact invasion of Czechoslovakia in 1968 and connects the apparent changes in Beijing's diplomacy to the Sino-Soviet split and the Vietnam War.

  • September 07, 1968

    CSSR Embassy Peking, 'Position of the Chinese People’s Republic regarding the Occupation of the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic, Comments in CPR Press and the Attitude of CPR Organs toward Our Representative Office in Peking'

    Account of the CPR's position regarding the Soviet occupation of the CSSR through press statements and statements by officials.

  • May 16, 1969

    Note Number 399 from Pierre Cerles to Michel Debré, 'China and Eastern Europe'

    Pierre Cerles provides an assessment of Chinese foreign policy toward Eastern Europe during the 1960s within the context of the Sino-Soviet split, the Warsaw Pact invasion of Czechoslovakia, the Cultural Revolution, and China's own internal leadership divisions.

  • October, 1969

    Polish-Soviet Talks in Moscow

    Excerpts from Polish-Soviet talks that focus on the China question. Brezhnev posits that the Chinese were the source of ideological divergence, and more specifically that their attitude has progressed to anti-Sovietism and anti-communism. Included is a report from a meeting with Zhou Enlai, who in discussing Czechoslovakia said a "process of bourgeoisie transformation and corruption was taking place over there, which is normal for all of the socialist countries." He attributed the cultural revolution with cutting off the roots of corruption in China.