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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • December 10, 1945

    Malik, 'On the Question of a United Government in Korea'

    This document discusses the creation of an independent Korea. Roosevelt, Churchill, and Jiang Jieshi (Chiang Kai-shek) first presented the idea at the Cairo Conference in 1943. The United States supports the creation of a single Korean state while the USSR opposes it. The document discusses the importance of the answer to the unification question for the Soviet Union's political and economic future as well as its interest in the Far East.

  • September 04, 1947

    Letter, V.M. Molotov to George C. Marshall

    Molotov blames the Americans for the failure of the US-Soviet Joint Commission on Korea and rejects the latest proposals put forth by Robert A. Lovett.

  • October 17, 1947

    Letter, Robert A. Lovett to V.M. Molotov

    Responding to Molotov's letter about Korea dated September 4, Lovett writes that the US will refer the Korean issue to the United Nations and forego further bilateral discussions with the USSR.

  • October 17, 1947

    George C. Marshall, 'A Program for a More Effective United Nations: Address by the Chief of the U.S. Delegation to the General Assembly'

    Marshall speaks about Greece, Palestine, and Korea, as well as the international control of atomic energy and the role and structure of the United Nations.

  • November 14, 1947

    112 (II), The Problem of the Independence of Korea

    UN Resolution 112 (II), "The Problem of the Independence of Korea," calls for elections to be held and for foreign troops to withdraw in order to achieve the unification of the Korean Peninsula.

  • July 11, 1948

    Record of Conversation between Kim Gu and Liu Yuwan

    Kim Gu (Kim Koo) and the Chinese Nationalist Minister Liu Yuwan discuss Kim's participation in the South Korean government, his attendance at a conference in Pyongyang, and the possibility of a Russian-led attack on southern Korea.

  • July 12, 1948

    Memo of the Directorate for Foreign Relations of the USSR Armed Forces General Staff about the Results of a Conference of Leaders of the Political Parties and Organizations of North and South Korea

    The statement describes the conference which took place in Pyongyang from June 29 to July 5. The main goal of the conference was to discuss the separate elections held in South Korea and possibilities for the unification of Korea. The North Korean representatives considered the National Assembly formed in South Korea to be illegitimate and urged for the expulsion of foreign powers in order to achieve a unified Korea.

  • October 22, 1948

    Telephone Message via VCh, Kim Il Sung to Generalissimo Iosif Vissarionovich Stalin

    Kim praises Stalin and the USSR for its role in securing Korean independence and in negotiating with the Americans on the Korean issue

  • December 12, 1948

    A/RES/293, The Problem of the Independence of Korea

    After accepting the United Nations Temporary Commission on Korea's report on the validity of the South Korean election, the UN General Assembly passes Resolution 195 to recognize the Republic of Korea as a legitimate government on the Korean Peninsula.

  • March 16, 1949

    National Security Council Report, NSC 8/1, 'The Position of the United States with Respect to Korea'

    Report by the National Security Council to the President on US policy objectives regarding Korea.

  • April 20, 1949

    The Korean Issue at the Third General Assembly of the United Nations

    Published by the Society for the Study of International Problems in 1949, this book contains a compilation of letters and news from 1948 that cover North Korea's position toward the Korean issue at the United Nations.

  • September 03, 1949

    Telegram, Tunkin to Vyshinsky

    Kim Il Sung, having recieved intelligence suggesting South Korea intended to seize the Ongjin Peninsula, requests Soviet permission to move further into South Korea.

  • September 14, 1949

    Telegram from Tunkin to the Soviet Foreign Ministry in Reply to 11 September Telegram

    North Korea plans to attack South Korea, but the Soviet Foreign Ministry is skeptical about North Korea's actual military capabilities and generally disproves of North Korea's plans.

  • September 24, 1949

    Politburo Decision to Confirm the Following Directive to the Soviet Ambassador in Korea

    The Soviet Politburo argues that North Korea is not ready to launch a successful overthrow of the South Korean regime and suggests North Korea should concentrate its efforts on developing partisan groups in South Korea.

  • January 19, 1950

    Telegram Shtykov to Vyshinsky on a Luncheon at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the DPRK

    Shtykov reports a meeting with Kim Il Sung, along with Chinese and Korean delegates. Kim Il Sung expresses his view on the prospect of a liberation of the South Korean people that is to follow the Chinese success in liberation. Kim expresses his view that the South Koreans support his cause for reunification which the South Korean government does not seem to purse, and that he desires to ask Stalin for permission on an offensive action on South Korea.

  • January 31, 1950

    Ciphered Telegram, Shtykov to Comrade Stalin

    As a response to Stalin's willingness to talk to Kim Il Sung on the issue of offensive attack to South Korea and on Stalin's request of lead, Kim Il Sung, according to Shtykov, responded that he would like to set up a meeting with him, and that he would take necessary measures for the lead to be delivered to the Soviet Union.

  • March 21, 1950

    Ciphered Telegram, Shtykov to Vyshinsky

    Shtykov reports on his meeting with Kim Il Sung where Kim Il Sung requests a meeting with Stalin in Moscow.

  • May 13, 1950

    Ciphered Telegram, Roshchin to Cde. Filippov [Stalin]

    The telegram relays a request from Mao, conveyed via Chinese Foreign Minister Zhou Enlai, seeking Stalin’s “personal clarifications” of his stand on a potential North Korean action to reunify the country. Mao sought the information after hearing a report from Kim, who had arrived that day in the Chinese capital for a secret two-day visit and clearly claimed that he had received Stalin’s blessing.

  • May 14, 1950

    Ciphered Telegram No. 8600, Vyshinsky to Mao Zedong

    The cable contains Stalin’s personal response to Mao's 13 May telegram. Using the code-name “Filippov,” Stalin confirms his agreement with the North Korean proposal to “move toward reunification,” contingent on Beijing’s agreement.

  • May 16, 1950

    Telegram, Filippov [Stalin] to Mao Zedong via the Soviet ambassador

    Stalin notifies Mao Zedong that he believes the signing of a treaty pact between China and North Korea should only come after Korean reunification.