Search in
ADD SEARCH FILTER CANCEL SEARCH FILTER

Digital Archive International History Declassified

SEARCH RESULTS

  • May 06, 1950

    Report, Hungarian Foreign Ministry to the Embassy of Hungary in North Korea (Excerpt)

    The Hungarian Ambassador to North Korea detailing the behavior of the North Korean delegation at the April 4, 1950 celebrations held in Budapest.

  • November 13, 1950

    Telegram from Shtykov to Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Moscow

    Soviet advice to North Korea concerning the upcoming session of the UN General Assembly on the Korea issue.

  • February 03, 1951

    Telegram from Stalin to Kim Il Sung, via Razuvaev

    Stalin states that the Soviet Union has insufficient lead to supply China, Korea and itself, Stalin also asks for the exportation of lead ore from Korea to the USSR.

  • June 30, 1951

    Ciphered telegram, Filippov (Stalin) to Mao Zedong

    Telegram from Stalin to Mao advising how to reply to the American request for armistice negotiations.

  • June 17, 1953

    Report from A. Grechko and Tarasov in Berlin to N.A. Bulganin, 6:30 p.m.

    In the Soviets' view the situation in Berlin was improving as the principal gorvernment buildings were safe and were guarded by Soviet forces. Martial law has been declared in Magdeburg, Leipzig, Dresden, Halle, Goerlitz, and Brandenburg.

  • June 17, 1953

    Report from A. Grechko and Tarasov in Berlin to N.A. Bulganin, 11:00 p.m.

    The demonstrations in Berlin and several other cities had been stopped. Grechko and Tarasow came to the conclusion that "the provocation was prepared in advance, organized, and directed from Western sectors of Berlin." The losses of the strikers in the whole territory of the GDR had been: 84 people killed and wounded, 700 men arrested.

  • July 31, 1953

    Resolution of the CPSU Central Committee (Draft)

    Draft resolution before the CPSU CC, seeking approval for actions required to strengthen the Soviet position in Germany and increasing the counteraction of the aggressive plans of the Anglo-American bloc in Europe.

  • 1955

    Untitled report on a visit to the Communist Bloc

    Extensive account of Cheab's visit to Budapest, Kiev, Moscow, Leningrad, Georgia, Bucharest, Sofia, and Plovdiv.

  • June 05, 1956

    Memorandum of Conversation with Choe Chang-ik

    Ambassador Ianov and Choe Chang-ik discuss the visit of the DPRK government delegation to Eastern Europe and the USSR and the policies of the Korean Worker's Party.

  • June 08, 1956

    Memorandum of Conversation with Choe Chang-ik

    Deputy Prime Minister of DPRK, Choe Chang-ik, discuss the unhealthy situation in the Korean Worker's Party and the North Korean government. Choe argues that there is nepotism within the personnel selection process and that a cult of personality exists within the KWP. Choe also expresses concern regarding the difficult economic situation in the DPRK.

  • August 04, 1956

    Memorandum of Conversation with Charge d’ Affaires of the Chinese Embassy Qiao Xiaoguang

    A memorandum of conversation between Qiao Xiaoguang of the Chinese Embassy and Petrov of Soviet Embassy in North Korea about the DPRK government delegation's visit to the USSR.

  • October 23, 1956

    Working Notes from the Session of the CPSU CC Presidium on 23 October 1956

    The Presidium is updated on events unfolding in Budapest. Khrushchev favors deploying troops to quell the uprising. Mikoyan, alone in his dissent, advocates political measures followed by troops if necessary. Nagy’s capacity to control the situation is discussed, Presidium members assert the incongruities with Poland, and Khrushchev dispatches Mikoyan and Suslov to Budapest.

  • October 30, 1956

    Working Notes from the Session of the CPSU CC Presidium on 30 October 1956

    The Presidium decides to promulgate a declaration on Hungary in which Soviet withdrawal and relations with the new government will be addressed. Members discuss the language of the new declaration and the advice of the CPC CC regarding the status of Soviet troops. The declaration is also intended to address the broader crisis in Soviet relations with people’s democracies.

  • November 01, 1956

    Bulgarian Military Intelligence Information on the Situation in Hungary and Poland

    This intelligence report discusses the domestic political developments in Poland after the ascent of Wladyslaw Gomulka to the top of the Polish United Workers' Party (PZPR).The events surrounding the Hungarian Revolution of 1956 are also mentioned.

  • November 02, 1956

    Working Notes from the Session of the CPSU CC Presidium on 2 November 1956

    The CPSU CC Presidium is confronted with reports from Hungary of mass demonstrations, armed counterrevolutionary groups, and the support for Nagy by the opposition. The CC is told about the Hungarian decision to declare neutrality and the likely confrontation between Soviet and Hungarian troops should the former continue to advance toward Budapest. Also discussed is the split within the HWP and possible Soviet responses.

  • November 03, 1956

    Working Notes from the Session of the CPSU CC Presidium on 3 November 1956, with Participation by J. Kadar, F. Munnich, and I. Horvath

    Kadar argues that the source of mistakes in the past resulted from the monopoly that a handful of Hungarians had on relations with the Soviet Union. Rakosi is singled out as a source for previous difficulties. Kadar believes that forming a new revolutionary government is the only way to undermine the violence of the counterrevolution and prevent Nagy from acting as cover for such activities. To garner support amongst workers, Kadar argues that the new government must not be a Soviet puppet.

  • November 04, 1956

    Stenographic record of a 4 November 1956 meeting of Party activists

    Khrushchev describes the events of the counterrevolution in Hungary and the crisis in Poland. He recounts the CPSU's consultations with other communist parties in the socialist camp to determine their attitude toward Soviet intervention, particularly in Hungary. Leaders from China, Czechoslovakia, Romania, and Yugoslavia agreed with the Soviet position, but Polish leaders opposed the presence of Soviet troops in Hungary. Khrushchev reports that following these meetings, the CPSU CC Presidium decided to prepare for an attack on the counterrevolutionary forces in Hungary. He then reads aloud an open letter which declares the Hungarian Revolutionary Workers and Peasants Government. He gives details about the suppression of the counterrevolution by Soviet armed forces and the positive reaction of the socialist countries. He states that the lessons of the counterrevolution are to improve relations with the fraternal parties and the socialist countries and to treat them with respect; to improve political work among students and the masses so that they are not mislead by counterrevolutionaries; and to strengthen the Soviet Army.

  • June 24, 1957

    Minutes of the Meeting of the CPSU CC Plenum on the State of Soviet Foreign Policy

    The Soviet leadership discusses the state of Soviet foreign policy after the Hungarian crisis and Khrushchev’s visit to the US. Molotov criticizes Khrushchev for recklessness in foreign policy direction. Soviet inroads in the Middle East and the Third World are analyzed. The effects of the crises in Eastern Europe are placed in the context of the struggle against US imperialism.

  • November, 1957

    Friendship and Solidarity Among Socialist Countries

    Kim Il Sung's article, originally published in Mezhdunarodnaya Zhizn, thanks the Soviet Union and China for assisting North Korea while deriding American foreign policy.

  • November 18, 1957

    Mao Zedong, 'Speech at a Meeting of the Representatives of Sixty-four Communist and Workers' Parties' (Edited by Mao)

    During a speech at the Moscow Meeting of Communist and Workers' Parties of 1957 , Mao Zedong proclaims that "the east wind prevailing over the west wind." This version of the speech was edited by Mao for publication.