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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • September 19, 1956

    Czechoslovak Politburo Resolution on Plan to 'Counter the Czechoslovak Reactionary Exiles'

    This Czechoslovak Politburo Resolution of 1956 approved an Interior Ministry plan to counter “reactionary exiles.” Radio Free Europe was an important target, and a series of disinformation actions were planned to disrupt its operations.

  • March 07, 1958

    Protocol on coordination of the Czechoslovak Interior Ministry delegation and border troops of the Soviet Union on state security

    This protocol resulted from a meeting between the Czechoslovak interior ministry and Soviet border troop representatives. The two parties convened to coordinate public safety measures undertaken in protection of the Czechoslovak-Soviet border.

  • March 12, 1958

    Report from Gen. M. Spasov on Multilateral Security Meeting in Bucharest

    A report by the Deputy Minister of Internal Affairs, Mircho Spasov, on the Ministerial Meeting in Bucharest of delegations from Romania, Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, and the Soviet Union. The meeting called for focusing on preventing subversive acts of Western intelligence, improving exchange of information, and conducting joint operations.

  • April 27, 1960

    Letter from Chairman of the USSR Committee of State Security A. Shelepin to Deputy Chairman and Minister of Internal Affairs of Czechoslovakia Rudolf Barák

    The USSR Committee of State Security agrees to send a delegation to a conference of leaders of other socialist security services to be held in Prague.

  • March 06, 1961

    Protocol on the joint negotiations of the Czechoslovak Interior Ministry delegation and the delegation of KGB border troops

    The Czechoslovak and Soviet delegations discussed the fulfillment of the 1958 joint proceedings on Soviet border troops, further coordination of the border organs of both parties, the relay of technical equipment at the border and joint actions for border searches. Also on the agenda was the easing of border passage in times of emergency for citizens of both states.

  • June, 1961

    Record of proceedings between the Soviet KGB and the Interior Ministry of the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic on the expansion of intelligence cooperation

    This document chronicles what was discussed between the KGB and Czechoslovak Interior Ministry concerning the coordination of intelligence and counter-intelligence acquisition and joint implementation of some of these measures. Global foreign policy and intelligence measures are discussed in places as diverse as the USA, NATO countries, Mexico, Brazil, Argentina, the Vatican, Guatemala, Cuba, the Congo, Angola, Indonesia, India, England and France. The Czechoslovak Socialist Republic and the Soviet Union pledge to fight perceived imperialist threats from the USA in Latin America, Africa, the Near and Middle East and Southeast Asia. The document lists companies of interest to the two parties, primarily scientific, armament and machine factories and companies.

  • July 08, 1961

    Letter from Chairman of the USSR Committee of State Security A. Shelepin to Minister of Internal Affairs of Czechoslovakia Lubomír Štrougal

    The Soviet Committee of State Security invites a delegation of senior officials from Czechoslovakian Ministry of Internal Affairs to visit Moscow.

  • June 12, 1962

    Record of a Conversation about the Results of Cooperation and Further Coordination of Intelligence and Counterintelligence Activities between the MVD of the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic and the KGB under the USSR Council of Ministers

    Discussion about potential exchange of intelligence and assistance between the two intelligence agencies.

  • June 15, 1962

    Letter to Minister of Interior Lubomír Štrouga, 'Jaroslav Mercl – Proposal to Send Him to British Guiana'

    A letter sent on behalf of the Head of 1st Directorate of the Ministry of the Interior regarding a proposal to send Jaroslav Mercl to British Guiana to make a confidential probe "of a political character, including the preparation for the opening of diplomatic relations between both countries after British Guiana gains independence."

  • July 02, 1962

    Agreement about Cooperation between the Committee for State Security under the USSR Council of Ministers and the Ministry of Internal Affairs of the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic

    The two delegations outline ways to unite their security apparatuses in the fight against subversive activity. Bilateral measures to be taken include the implementation of material and informational exchanges on hostile individuals and the sharing of news on the form and manner of unfriendly activity.

  • April 26, 1963

    Agreement between the Soviet and Czechoslovak state security bodies on the terms of delivery for specialized technology and the related bookkeeping procedure

    This document details how to improve ties between the state security forces of the Soviet Union and Czechoslovak Republic. It refers to the terms of direct delivery of specialized technology associated with a military delivery plan. There is also discussion on bookkeeping methods so both nations can register the delivery. The protocol is designed to improve coordination of reciprocal deliveries of specialized technology.

  • June 24, 1963

    Agreement between representatives of Soviet and Czechoslovak security authorities on how to enhance security coordination

    This agreement between the representatives of seven Soviet and seven Czechoslovak security agencies relates to enhanced security coordination between the two countries. The parties agree to share technological changes, various resources and intelligence that is relevant to state security.

  • March 26, 1965

    Record of a Conversation between Representatives of the USSR Committee of State Security and the Ministry of Internal Affairs of the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic Concerning Questions of the Cooperation of the Covert Inspection of Mail Services

    The CSSR and the USSR intelligence services agree to share information regarding suspicious mail correspondence.

  • July 04, 1965

    Summary Record of the Discussions CSSR MVD and KGB Delegations

    This report summarizes extended cooperation measures undertaken by representatives of the Czechoslovak and Soviet security agencies. Methods to increase cooperation include the exchange of operational and scientific technology and enhanced coordination between operational agencies to combat espionage and ideological diversion.

  • June 16, 1966

    Plan of the Reception of a CSSR MVD Delegation Arriving in Moscow on 21 June 1966

    Agenda and time table for the delegation's visit.

  • January 11, 1967

    Cooperation between the Czechoslovak and Cuban Intelligence Services

    The report introduces Czechoslovak's assistance in the Operation MANUEL after the isolation of socialist Castro regime. Cuba looked for alternative routes in Europe in order to promote and influence the revolutionary movement in Latin America. Czechoslovakia assistance in the operation is of a strictly technical nature and its intelligence service is doing its utmost to protect the interests of the country by securing all technical matters. The report says that terminating the assistance was not possible for both practical and political reasons-- all direct flights between Czechoslovakia and Cuba would be suspended and a drastic cooling off of relations between two governments. Czechoslovak's refusal in assisting the operation would be interpreted as a political decision to suspend assistance to the national liberation movement in Latin America countries. However, the reports says that the assistance of Czechoslovak intelligence service to the operation is in no way amounts to agreeing with its political content and constitutes a minor aspect of intelligence work. The Soviet intelligence was also involved in organizing the operation in Moscow and offered assistance to its Cuban counterpart.

  • July 29, 1967

    Letter from the Chairman of the KGB Andropov to the Minister of Internal Affairs of the CSSR Kudrna

    Appointment of Soviet officials for discussion of the procedure for joint border monitoring of trains and passengers crossing the Soviet-Czechoslovak border.

  • November 07, 1967

    Complaint by [Government of] Brazil Regarding Czechoslovak Transport of Guerrilla Fighters from Cuba to Latin America

    Head of the 1st Administration of the Ministry of the Interior Josef Houska reports a complaint by the Brazilian government regarding to Czechoslovak assistance of transporting guerrilla fighters from Cuba to Latin America. Brazilian government issued an official warning that relations between Brazil and Czechoslovak could be deteriorated in connection with the support for Cuba. Houska says Brazilian officials' argument could be proof that Czechoslovak specially selected officials making technical arrangement for the transits belong to some section of the Czechoslovak civil service. However, the Czechoslovak authorities cannot be blamed that they go along with the activities of the Cuban Embassy in Prague, which controls the transport of the guerrillas since an embassy is entitled to engage in full diplomatic activities in a friendly country. Houska argues that the Brazilian government does not have conceret evidence for the direct accusation of Czechoslovakia. The position of the Brazilian Ministry of Foreign Affairs could have been the result of pressure by ultra-reactionary forces in domestic policy which are concerned by the opposition activities in Brazil and abroad.

  • November 17, 1967

    Operation MANUEL: Origins, Development and Aims

    Comrade Josef Houska submits a document concerning issues related to cooperation with the Cuban intelligence service especially the Operation MANUEL to the Central Committee of the Communist Party of Czechoslovakia. The Operational MANUEL started in 1962 when the Cuban intelligence asked the Czechoslovak resident in Havana to arrange a transit through Prague for Venezuelan nationals who underwent guerrilla training in Cuba. In 1964 talks were held between Cuban and Czechoslovak intelligence services but no formal agreement of the tasks and responsibilities was concluded between the two. The Soviet government was informed about the Operation MANUEL and stated its agreement with the project. Houska says that the main objective of the operation is the education and training of revolutionary cadres from Latin America and the organization of combat groups. Participants of the operation were not confined to cadres from among the ranks of communist parties but also included members from various nationalist and anti-American groupings. The routes of individual participants in the operation were determined by the Cuban intelligence service who mainly directed the Operation MANUEL. Houska says problems that arisen in the course of the operation were solved in collaboration with Cuban and the Soviet authorities. The document cautioned about counter-espionage institutions' increasing interests in the operation and the fact that the US intelligence service agents were among the operation participants. Houska says refusal to offer assistance would have a negative impact on Cuba and Czechoslovakia would lose control over the operation.

  • April 11, 1969

    Report to CPSU Central Committee on Visit of Czech Delegation to Discuss Countering Enemy Propaganda in Czechoslovakia

    This document indicates the continuing influence of German-language and other Western media in Czechoslovakia nine months after the Soviet invasion of August 1968. Czechoslovak officials criticized the heavy-handed Soviet broadcasts of Radio Vltava, and viewed other Soviet proposals to counter Western influence as counterproductive.