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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • June, 1934

    Letter of Governor Shicai Sheng to Cdes. Stalin, Molotov, and Voroshilov

    Governor Shicai Sheng expresses his firm belief in Communism, his desire to overthrow the Nanjing Government and construct a Communist state in its place, and the need to establish a Communist Party branch in Xinjiang. Emphasizing his long study of Marxist theory, he requests that Stalin, Molotov, and Voroshilov allow him to join the Communist Party.

  • November 01, 1934

    Letter from Governer Shicai Sheng to Cdes. Stalin, Molotov, and Voroshilov

    Responding to Stalin, Molotov, and Voroshilov's letter of 27 July, Sheng expresses his agreement with their assertions about Xinjiang's unsuitability for Communist rule and the inadvisability of overthrowing the Nanjing government. Accepting that he cannot become a member of the Communist Party at this time, Sheng expresses his gratitude for the Soviet assistance he has received and requests that he and Consul General Apresov be permitted to travel to Moscow.

  • January 04, 1939

    Translation of a Letter from Governor Shicai Sheng to Cdes. Stalin, Molotov, and Voroshilov

    Governor Sheng Shicai expresses gratitude to Cdes. Stalin, Molotov, and Voroshilov for the opportunity to visit Moscow. After reporting critical remarks made by Fang Lin against the Soviet Union and the Communist Party, Sheng Shicai requests that the All-Union Communist Party dispatch a politically experienced person to Urumqi to discuss Party training and asks that the Comintern order the Chinese Communist Party in Xinjiang to liquidate the Party organization.

  • May 10, 1942

    Letter from Governor Shicai Sheng to Cdes. Stalin, Molotov, and Voroshilov

    Governor Sheng describes the investigation into Sheng Shiqi's (the Commander of the Mechanized Brigade of Xinjiang) death, which revealed that Chen Xiuying (his wife) murdered him under pressure from Xiao Zuoxin, the assistant to the Director of the Urumqi office of the Native Corporation. He also reports that Kruglov, Soviet advisor for trade matters, intentionally disrupted trade between the Soviet Union and Xinjiang because of the Xinjiang government's alleged anti-Soviet attitude.

  • September, 1944

    Memorandum by George Kennan , 'Russia – Seven Years Later' (excerpt)

    George Kennan describes Stalin's character, underlining the importance of his nationality, ignorance of the west, and his seclusion. Kennan further warns that Stalin's advisors are not interested in collaborating with western democracies, and that Russia's internal police regime is developed beyond its foreign policy.

  • September 29, 1944

    Letter, Igor V. Kurchatov, Director of the Soviet Nuclear Program, to Lavrenti Beria

    In this letter, physicist Igor V. Kurchatov, the scientific director of the Soviet nuclear project, writes to secret police chief Lavrenti Beria, whom Stalin had given principal responsibility for the atomic effort. Prodded by his own scientists and by intelligence reports of the secret Anglo-American atomic enterprise, Stalin had initiated a small-scale Soviet nuclear weapons program in late 1942-early 1943. But the level of support political leaders had given the project failed to satisfy Kurchatov, who pleaded with Beria for additional backing.

  • July 01, 1945

    Cable, Summary of Averell Harriman Meeting with T. V. Soong

    Harriman reports on a conversation with Chinese Minister Soong about his meeting with Stalin. Soong reports that China and the USSR wish to establish close ties; Harriman encourages Soong on this point.

  • July, 1945

    Message from Averell Harriman to the President and Secretary of State

    Harriman reports on Chiang Kai-Shek and Stalin's bartering over the status of Outer Mongolia. Chiang refuses to recognize its independence now, but offers to hold a plebiscite after the war.

  • October 10, 1945

    TASS Digest Distributed to I.V. Stalin and V.M. Molotov, 'Italian Newspapers Spread Absurd Rumors'

    Rumors that Stalin is ill being spread by Italian newspapers.

  • February 09, 1946

    Speech Delivered by Stalin at a Meeting of Voters of the Stalin Electoral District, Moscow

    English translation of Stalin's 1946 "election" speech.

  • February 22, 1946

    George Kennan's 'Long Telegram'

    Ambassador George F. Kennan writes to the Secretary of State with a lengthy analysis of Soviet policy in an attempt to explain their recent uncooperative behavior. This message would later become famous as the "long telegram."

  • May 25, 1946

    Memorandum from M. Litvinov to Stalin, 25 May 1946

    Memorandum from M. Litvinov to Stalin, 25 May 1946. Memorandum discusses comments on the American “Draft Treaties” and the provisions set up for Japan and Germany post-Potsdam.

  • July 01, 1947

    Cipher Telegram from G. Dimitrov to J. Stalin on Damyan Velchev’s Behavior in Switzerland

    Report on the activities of the former Defense Minister and Chief of the Bulgarian mission in Bern, Damyan Velchev, against the new Bulgarian regime.

  • March 14, 1948

    Stenographic Record of a Speech by Comrade J. V. Stalin at a Special Session of the Politburo, March 14, 1948

    Speech by Stalin to a special session of the Politburo. He argues that because of differing ideologies between the USSR and the United States, hostilities are inevitable and, for that reason, the country's military should be enlarged. He praises the example set by the Chinese communist movement, and notes that India should be where the Soviet Union directs its attention to next. Brian Murray questions the validity of the document in CWIHP Working Paper No. 12, where the document was first published.

  • July 26, 1948

    Cipher Message from G. Dimitrov to I. Stalin and V. Molotov

    The Bulgarian government is disturbed by the recent dislocations of Yugoslav armed forces along the Bulgarian-Yugoslav border in the Macedonia region. Officials in Sofia fear a Yugoslav attempt to annex Pirin region to Macedonia.

  • October 18, 1949

    Cipher Message from Kolarov and Chervenkov to Stalin on Investigated Bulgarian Armed Forces Commanders

    Vassil Kolarov and Vulko Chervenkov report on the measures taken against Bulgarian cadets at the Voroshilov Military Academy implicated in unlawful activities.

  • July 01, 1950

    Ciphered Telegram No. 34691 from Feng Xi [Stalin] to Soviet Ambassador in Pyongyang Shtykov

    Reply from Stalin to Shtykov's telegram of July 1, 1950. Requests additional information on KPA plans and reaction to American internvention. Informs of intent to meet requests by Kim Il Sung for additional war materiel.

  • September 29, 1950

    Telegram from Shtykov to Gromyko and Stalin

    Shtykov gives an insider’s report of a meeting with Kim Il Sung and Pak Heon-yeong, in which they discussed the current desperate state of the KPA, possible advancement of the US forces over the 38th parallel and the extent of the enemy’s knowledge of Soviet Union deliveries to North Korea. Kim asks for advice concerning the appeal for military aid that the Political Council of the Worker’s Party of Korea plans to send to Stalin. Shytkov comments on the nervousness and desperation of the Korean officials.

  • October 09, 1952

    Record of S. Radhakrishnan’s Meeting with the FRG President

    Radhakrishnan discusses German unification with the President of West Germany, touches on India's independent stances on foreign policy issues in China, Japan, and Korea, and speaks at length about Russia's internal policies. Radhakrishnan summarizes a previous discussion with Stalin, in detail, discussing Soviet approaches to religion (compared with Indian approaches), and Stalin's strong denial of accusations of aggression: Radhakrishnan says that he is "convinced that Stalin and Russia are gripped by sincere fears of a Western attack." Radhakrisnan concludes by expressing his hope that Germany can unify.

  • March 05, 1953

    CPSU CC Protocol, 'Record of Proceedings of the Joint Meeting of the CPSU Central Committee Plenum, the Council of Ministers of the Union of the SSR, and the Presidium of the Supreme Council of the USSR'

    This protocol concerns the meeting of the CPSU Presidium & Soviet Council of Ministers as Stalin was about to die.