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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • June, 1934

    Letter of Governor Shicai Sheng to Cdes. Stalin, Molotov, and Voroshilov

    Governor Shicai Sheng expresses his firm belief in Communism, his desire to overthrow the Nanjing Government and construct a Communist state in its place, and the need to establish a Communist Party branch in Xinjiang. Emphasizing his long study of Marxist theory, he requests that Stalin, Molotov, and Voroshilov allow him to join the Communist Party.

  • November 01, 1934

    Letter from Governer Shicai Sheng to Cdes. Stalin, Molotov, and Voroshilov

    Responding to Stalin, Molotov, and Voroshilov's letter of 27 July, Sheng expresses his agreement with their assertions about Xinjiang's unsuitability for Communist rule and the inadvisability of overthrowing the Nanjing government. Accepting that he cannot become a member of the Communist Party at this time, Sheng expresses his gratitude for the Soviet assistance he has received and requests that he and Consul General Apresov be permitted to travel to Moscow.

  • January 04, 1939

    Translation of a Letter from Governor Shicai Sheng to Cdes. Stalin, Molotov, and Voroshilov

    Governor Sheng Shicai expresses gratitude to Cdes. Stalin, Molotov, and Voroshilov for the opportunity to visit Moscow. After reporting critical remarks made by Fang Lin against the Soviet Union and the Communist Party, Sheng Shicai requests that the All-Union Communist Party dispatch a politically experienced person to Urumqi to discuss Party training and asks that the Comintern order the Chinese Communist Party in Xinjiang to liquidate the Party organization.

  • May 10, 1942

    Letter from Governor Shicai Sheng to Cdes. Stalin, Molotov, and Voroshilov

    Governor Sheng describes the investigation into Sheng Shiqi's (the Commander of the Mechanized Brigade of Xinjiang) death, which revealed that Chen Xiuying (his wife) murdered him under pressure from Xiao Zuoxin, the assistant to the Director of the Urumqi office of the Native Corporation. He also reports that Kruglov, Soviet advisor for trade matters, intentionally disrupted trade between the Soviet Union and Xinjiang because of the Xinjiang government's alleged anti-Soviet attitude.

  • September, 1944

    Memorandum by George Kennan , 'Russia – Seven Years Later' (excerpt)

    George Kennan describes Stalin's character, underlining the importance of his nationality, ignorance of the west, and his seclusion. Kennan further warns that Stalin's advisors are not interested in collaborating with western democracies, and that Russia's internal police regime is developed beyond its foreign policy.

  • September 29, 1944

    Letter, Igor V. Kurchatov, Director of the Soviet Nuclear Program, to Lavrenti Beria

    In this letter, physicist Igor V. Kurchatov, the scientific director of the Soviet nuclear project, writes to secret police chief Lavrenti Beria, whom Stalin had given principal responsibility for the atomic effort. Prodded by his own scientists and by intelligence reports of the secret Anglo-American atomic enterprise, Stalin had initiated a small-scale Soviet nuclear weapons program in late 1942-early 1943. But the level of support political leaders had given the project failed to satisfy Kurchatov, who pleaded with Beria for additional backing.

  • July 01, 1945

    Cable, Summary of Averell Harriman Meeting with T. V. Soong

    Harriman reports on a conversation with Chinese Minister Soong about his meeting with Stalin. Soong reports that China and the USSR wish to establish close ties; Harriman encourages Soong on this point.

  • July, 1945

    Message from Averell Harriman to the President and Secretary of State

    Harriman reports on Chiang Kai-Shek and Stalin's bartering over the status of Outer Mongolia. Chiang refuses to recognize its independence now, but offers to hold a plebiscite after the war.

  • October 10, 1945

    TASS Digest Distributed to I.V. Stalin and V.M. Molotov, 'Italian Newspapers Spread Absurd Rumors'

    Rumors that Stalin is ill being spread by Italian newspapers.

  • October 11, 1945

    TASS Digest Distributed to Cde. I.V. Stalin and Cde. C.M. Molotov, 'French Newspaper concerning Rumors in Connection with Comrade Stalin's Going on Vacation; etc.'

    French newspaper "Pari-Press" reported on rumors of Stalin's departure for the Caucuses on vacation, and claimed this confirmed rumors Stalin was ill; Newspaper "Chicago Tribune" similarly reported rumors of Stalin's retirement and a resulting 'behind-the-scenes battle for power' between Zhukov, backed by the army, and Molotov, backed by the Communist Party.

  • October 16, 1945

    TASS Digest Distributed to Cde. I.V. Stalin and Cde. C.M. Molotov, 'The Anti-Soviet Fabrications of a Mexican Newspaper; Etc.'

    Summary of news reports from Mexico, Sweden, Canada, and Great Britain, most on Stalin's alleged illness.

  • October 19, 1945

    TASS Digest Distributed to Cde. I.V. Stalin and Cde. C.M. Molotov, 'Ecuadorian Press about a Statement Ascribed to Comrade Stalin by a New York Times Correspondent; etc.'

    Articles on the Yalta Conference, Foreign Minister Molotov's influence in the Soviet Union, and Stalin's alleged illness.

  • October 21, 1945

    TASS Digest Distributed to Cde. I.V. Stalin and Cde. C.M. Molotov, 'The Assertions of An Associated Press Commentator; etc.'

    Articles on Stalin's alleged death, retirement or vacation and the implications of his possible retreat from politics.

  • October 22, 1945

    TASS Digest Distributed to Cde. I.V. Stalin and Cde. C.M. Molotov, 'Radio Broadcasts; Sadak's Article'

    TASS reports on rumors of Stalin's illness in Congolese and Turkish newspapers as well as a Turkish analysis of Soviet politics.

  • October 23, 1945

    TASS Digest Distributed to Cde. I.V. Stalin and Cde. C.M. Molotov, 'Radio Broadcast'

    The Soviet embassy in London responded to rumors by announcing that Stalin's health is "excellent."

  • October 23, 1945

    TASS Digest Distributed to Cde. I.V. Stalin and Cde. C.M. Molotov, 'Radio Broadcasts'

    Rumors continue to circulate that Stalin is ill, and Soviet representatives have neither confirmed nor denied these rumors.

  • October 24, 1945

    TASS News Summary, 'A Denial of the Press Department of the Soviet Embassy in London

    Reports of that Stalin is ill.

  • October 26, 1945

    TASS Digest Distributed to Cde. I.V. Stalin and Cde. C.M. Molotov, 'London Report About Norwegian Newspapers; Etc.'

    TASS reports on rumors that Stalin is ill and blames the American press for fueling these rumors.

  • October 27, 1945

    TASS Digest Distributed to Cde. I.V. Stalin et al, 'Radio Broadcast'

    US Ambassador to the Soviet Union Harriman told the press that Stalin was in good condition when they met in Sochi.

  • October 28, 1945

    TASS Digest Distributed to Cde. I.V. Stalin and Cde. C.M. Molotov, 'The London Correspondent of "The New York Times" About Comrade Stalin; etc.'

    TASS reports on newspaper articles in the foreign press disputing rumors of Stalin's illness.