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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • July 26, 1948

    Cipher Message from G. Dimitrov to I. Stalin and V. Molotov

    The Bulgarian government is disturbed by the recent dislocations of Yugoslav armed forces along the Bulgarian-Yugoslav border in the Macedonia region. Officials in Sofia fear a Yugoslav attempt to annex Pirin region to Macedonia.

  • 1949

    The Anti-Tito Network in Yugoslavia

    Information gathered from a Yugoslav "political refugee" Zoran Mitrovich living in Romania. Mitrovich describes the anti-Tito organization or network in Yugoslavia in the Belgrade and Nish areas.

  • February 10, 1949

    Proposal for Counter-Intelligence Operation ''Traitor'' Against Yugoslav Agents

    A proposal for the measures against the Yugoslav agents and their collaborators who, on Tito’s behalf, were allegedly working for the annexation of the Pirin Region by the Yugoslav Federation.

  • June 23, 1949

    Yugoslav-Croatian Movements

    Information on Yugoslav and Croatian activities against the Tito government in Syria and Lebanon

  • June 23, 1949

    Yugoslavia-Israel

    Report regarding the new prime minister of Yugoslavia who is working towards cooperation between Tito and Israel.

  • November, 1950

    Meeting of the Secretariat of the Information Bureau - Steps to Counteract Titoism in Romania

    A report presented by the Romanian Workers' Party (Gheorghe Gheorghiu-Dej) at the meeting of the Communist Information Bureau of November 1950 in Bucharest, which lists the steps taken in order to counteract Titoism in Romania, and particularly in the area of the border with Yugoslavia, as well as to facilitate its overthrow in Yugoslavia itself.

  • January 01, 1953

    Soviet Plan to Assassinate Tito

    NKVD plan to assassinate Josip Broz Tito by a Soviet covert agent, codenamed “Max.” The plan envisions assassinating Tito during a private audience during Tito’s forthcoming visit to London, or at a diplomatic reception in Belgrade. This document was not dated.

  • January 21, 1954

    Report on the Reception of Yugoslavian Diplomat Vidic by Soviet Foreign Minister Vyacheslav Molotov

    Memorandum of conversation between Soviet Foreign Minister Molotov and Yugoslav Ambassador Vidic. Topics of discussion include Austrian-Yugoslav relations, and the current state of relations with the Soviet Union. This memorandum was written one year after the Tito-Stalin split, and the founding of Titoism.

  • March 12, 1955

    From the Journal of Ambassador Pavel Yudin: Record of Conversation with Mao Zedong on 8 March 1955

    A conversation between Soviet Ambassador to China Pavel Yudin and Mao Zedong. Topics of discussion included the writing of an article for Pravda regarding Lenin's influence of the Chinese Revolution, the Gao Gang Affair, and the recent break between Josip Tito's Yugoslavia and the Soviet Union.

  • July 09, 1955

    Central Committee Plenum of the CPSU Ninth Session, N. A. Bulganin Address

    Discussion in the CPSU CC Plenum on Soviet-Yugoslav relations. Bulganin deplores the situation reached due to the Soviet-Yugoslav split and calls for a rapprochement with Tito. Other CPSU members including Nikita Khrushchev agree.

  • October 31, 1956

    Resolution of the Presidium of the Central Committee About the Situation in Hungary (Protocol 49)

    This resolution instructs the Soviet Ambassador to Belgrade to transmit a letter to Tito requesting a secret meeting on November 1 or 2 with Khrushchev and Malenkov. It also empowers certain members to conduct negotiations with the United Workers Party of Poland.

  • April, 1957

    Khrushchev’s Speech at the Lunch Organized in Honor of the Albanian Government and Party Delegation, Moscow

    Khrushchev defends Enver Hoxha against personal attacks from Josip Broz Tito, but emphasizes cooperation between Yugoslavia and socialist camp. Khrushchev also suggests that Albania is a potential foothold for the spread of socialism to Asian, African, and Middle Eastern countries, and calls for "ideological war" in order to spread influence to these areas.

  • April 15, 1957

    Memorandum of Conversation with Soviet Leaders on Party-Related Issues

    Hoxha complains to Khrushchev about Yugoslavia's conduct toward Albania. While Khrushchev says that the Soviet Union will back Albania, he complains about Hoxha's personal demeanor and emotional complaints about Yugoslavia. Khrushchev also criticizes Albania's decision to execute a woman, and a Yugoslav national.

  • June 24, 1957

    Minutes of the Meeting of the CPSU CC Plenum on the State of Soviet Foreign Policy

    The Soviet leadership discusses the state of Soviet foreign policy after the Hungarian crisis and Khrushchev’s visit to the US. Molotov criticizes Khrushchev for recklessness in foreign policy direction. Soviet inroads in the Middle East and the Third World are analyzed. The effects of the crises in Eastern Europe are placed in the context of the struggle against US imperialism.

  • April 19, 1958

    From the Diary of P. F. Yudin: Memorandum of Conversation with Mao Zedong on 5 April 1958

    Conversation between P.F. Yudin, Mao Zedong, and Zhou Enlai regarding Yugoslavia's place in the international Communist community, especially Tito's inconsistency as an ally.

  • May 12, 1958

    Journal of Soviet Ambassador in the DPRK A. M. Puzanov for 12 May 1958

    Pak Geum-cheol and Puzanov are indignant with the League of Communists of Yugoslavia, while Nam Il desires for the Soviet Union to expand an exhibit about the peaceful use of atomic energy in Pyongyang.

  • June 04, 1958

    Journal of Soviet Ambassador in the DPRK A. M. Puzanov for 4 June 1958

    Surina agrees with Puzanov that the KWP CC is strengthening the solidarity and unity of Party ranks on the basis of Marxism-Leninism but is concerned that senior North Korean officials do not study the Russian language.

  • October 02, 1958

    Memorandum of Conversation of Mao Zedong with Six Delegates of the Socialist Countries, China, 2 October 1958

    To the other delegates, Mao discusses their shared goal of defeating imperialism, primarily through peaceful methods. He stresses widespread Marxist reeducation of the Chinese people and increased Chinese industrial and agricultural production as means for improvement. Mao also reminds them that socialist nations must be firmly united under the leadership of the Soviet Union to fight colonialism and imperialism, and while the communes are necessary to organize locally, the party remains the core administrative unite of communized peoples.

  • January 11, 1961

    Information from MVR Inspectorate on Yugoslav Intelligence Services Against Bulgaria

    The Ministry of Internal Affairs reports its intelligence findings on the activities of the Yugoslav intelligence services against Bulgaria. Working both from home and in-country, the Yugoslav intelligence is allegedly trying to gather information on a broad set of issues – ranging from trade relations within Comecon, to Bulgaria’s military capacity and its potential to pose a threat to Yugoslav Macedonia.

  • July 26, 1961

    Report on the 1st conference of the non-aligned countries of September 1st, 1961 sent by Tahmaz Beqari, the Albanian ambassador in Belgrade, to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Albania

    The conference of non-aligned countries in Belgrade was organized when Indonesia and other countries of Asia and Africa were attempting to organize a Second Bandung Conference. Tito and Nehru, trying to minimize the influence of China in the Asian and African countries, initiated a conference that they called the Conference of Non-Aligned Countries in Belgrade. The document discusses the 24 participating countries, the agenda, the proceedings, the different groups among the delegation and the two main documents that the conference adopted: the manifesto and the declaration. The manifesto, titled “The Danger from the War and the Call for Peace,” according to the Albanian ambassador, was adopted in a revisionist spirit, calling on Khrushchev and Kennedy to maintain peace. Meanwhile, the declaration criticized colonialism and imperialism. The Belgrade conference did not decide on any specific issues and did not reach any important conclusions. In Albania, a week after the conference, the journal “Zeri i Popullit” (Voice of the People) wrote an article in which it identified Tito as an agent of imperialism and stated that Yugoslavia was not an non-aligned country as it participated in the Balkan Pact.