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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • February, 1942

    Letter to Stalin from the Commanders and Soldiers of the Korean Army in China

    Korean commanders express high hopes that Stalin's Red Army will defeat fascist forces all around the world.

  • April 02, 1946

    Protocol No. 18 of a Meeting of the Special Committee under the Council of Ministers of the USSR (Excerpt)

    Special dossier containing a resolution to send a Soviet geological prospecting party to survey North Korea for beryllium.

  • April 25, 1947

    Protocol No. 36 of a Meeting of the Special Committee under the Council of Ministers of the Soviet Union (Excerpt)

    Special dossier refining aspects of the geological prospecting party to North Korea, to extract "rare elements".

  • May 12, 1947

    Cable No. 121973, Meretskov and Shytkov to Cde. Stalin

    A request to send Soviet specialists to North Korea. The DPRK especially needs engineers to help them build railways. Shtykov notes that if the Koreans don’t receive aid from the Soviets, they'll turn to the Americans.

  • October 12, 1947

    Incoming Cable No. 16, Malik to Cde. Stalin

    Stalin agrees to Malik's proposal regarding the situation in Korea, which calls for the creation of an All-Korean Temporary Assembly to resolve the peninsula's issues. The Soviet representative is to insist to the Americans that such a consultative body be established.

  • October 20, 1947

    Ciphered Telegram, Molotov to Cde. Stalin

    Molotov relates how the Americans have rejected the Soviet position toward establishing a temporary all Korean assembly. While there is some overlap between both positions, this issue has now been exacerbated by Marshall's move to decide it in the UNGA. The Soviets should respond to this move by reiterating their commitment to a self-determined form of government for Korea, which requires the Soviets and Americans to withdraw their troops.

  • October 23, 1947

    Draft of Telegram to Vyshinsky on the Korean Question

    Vyshinsky is instructed that, because the Korean issue is already on the UNSC agenda, it should remain there. Vyshinsky should stake out a position that both American and Soviet troops withdraw simultaneously, allowing the Koreans to develop a unified government. Elected representatives from both Koreas should be invited to discussions. A time span for the troop withdrawals must be set. The draft includes some scrawled recommendations from Stalin.

  • October 29, 1947

    Telegram No. 418 from Vyshinsky

    Vyshinsky outlines the amendment that the US has introduced regarding the Korean question. Moreover, Vyshinsky asserts the plan to object to the amendment and express why the amendment is not compatible with the proposal of the Soviets.

  • October 29, 1947

    Telegram No. 423, Vyshinsky to Cde. Molotov

    Vyshinsky clarifies that in case there is a decision to form a commission in Korea, it is not advisable for the US and the Soviets to take part. Vyshinsky requests for an answer on this issue.

  • October 29, 1947

    Telegram, V. Molotov to Cde. Stalin

    V. Molotov states the importance that the Korean issue should be discussed with the Koreans. He also details that in the case of opposing proposals from the US, the Soviets should oppose and abstain rather than voting against them.

  • October 29, 1947

    Telegram Nos. 408-411, Vyshinsky to Molotov

    Vyshinsky outlines the proceedings at the UN, where discussion of the Korean question and the withdrawal of Foreign troops from Korea has led the Soviets to insist that the Koreans be invited to the discussions. He details counter proposals from the Americans, and Soviet responses to these resolutions.

  • October 30, 1947

    Telegram, V. Molotov to Cde. Stalin

    V. Molotov states the importance that the Korean issue should be discussed with the Koreans. He also details that in the case the amendments are approved, the Soviet Union will not take part in the work of the US proposed committee. He also details that in the case the amendments are approved, the Soviet Union will not take part in the work of the US proposed committee.

  • December 18, 1947

    Central Intelligence Agency, ORE-62, 'Implementation of Soviet Objectives in Korea'

    The CIA analyzes Soviet policy in northern Korea, claiming that it seeks to create a satellite state.

  • April 12, 1948

    Protocol No. 61 of a Meeting of the Special Committee under the Council of Ministers of the USSR (Excerpt)

    Memorandum of the Special Committee of the CC CPSU postponing the geological prospecting for uranium in North Korea.

  • May 22, 1948

    Comments and a Conclusion on the Draft Provisional Constitution of the Korean People's Democratic Republic

    Comments and discussion on several articles of a draft constitution for the Democratic People's Republic of Korea.

  • July 11, 1948

    Record of Conversation between Kim Gu and Liu Yuwan

    Kim Gu (Kim Koo) and the Chinese Nationalist Minister Liu Yuwan discuss Kim's participation in the South Korean government, his attendance at a conference in Pyongyang, and the possibility of a Russian-led attack on southern Korea.

  • October 22, 1948

    Telephone Message via VCh, Kim Il Sung to Generalissimo Iosif Vissarionovich Stalin

    Kim praises Stalin and the USSR for its role in securing Korean independence and in negotiating with the Americans on the Korean issue

  • October 10, 1948

    Soviet Political, Economic, and Cultural Aid to the DPRK People for the DPRK's Democratic Construction

    The Ministry of Culture and Propaganda publishes a pamphlet on the Soviet Union's tremendous assistance to the DPRK and contrasts the Soviet Union with the behavior of the US and Japan.

  • October 12, 1948

    Telephone Message via VCh, I. Stalin to Kim Il Sung

    Telegram from Stalin to Kim Il Sung acknowledging Kim's telegram from the 8th of October. Stalin states that the Soviet government is ready to begin diplomatic relations with the DPRK, exchange ambassadors, and start economic relations

  • March, 1949

    Soviet-Korean Protocol about Temporarily Leaving Soviet Navy Subunits in the Port of Chongjin

    List of agreements between the two governments that state that the USSR will leave some of their navy forces in the port of Chongjin, and that the DPRK will provide the necessary housing and facilities for the troops. Troops will be excused from customs and those working for the troops can move across borders with documents decided by both the USSR and DPRK.