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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • September 01, 1979

    Soviet Ambassador to Cuba Vorotnikov, Memorandum of Conversation with Raul Castro

    Raul Castro discusses with the Soviet Ambassador in Cuba the position to be adopted by the Cuban and Soviet governments with regard to the presence of Soviet soldiers in Cuba. Raul Castro also informs the Soviet Ambassador of the discussions that took place between Fidel Castro and Josip Tito in Havana during the meeting of the non-aligned countries.

  • 1980

    Soviet briefing on the need to counter-balance Yugoslav endeavors concerning the Afghan question in the non-aligned countries

    This document provides an assessment of Yugoslavia’s policy regarding non-aligned countries. The Soviet Union analyses how to counter-balance the non-alignment movement with its foreign policy. The topic of non-interference in internal political matters, and the opinion of Ghana, Kuwait, and India regarding Soviet involvement in Afghanistan are discussed.

  • January 20, 1980

    'Some Ideas About Foreign Policy Results of the 1970s (Points)' of Academician O. Bogomolov of the Institute of the Economy of the World Socialist System sent to the CC CPSU and the KGB

    Summary of the affects of Soviet military intervention in Afghanistan.

  • March 04, 1980

    CPSU CC Directive to Soviet Ambassadors in Communist Countries, Instructions 'About the China Question'

    Instructions to Soviet ambassadors on dealing with China's outreach to socialist countries in the eastern bloc, outlining a series of steps for Soviet ambassadors to follow which would foster skepticism about China’s intentions and thwart efforts by Chinese representatives to make wide-ranging contacts in these states. The directive notes China’s hostility to Vietnam, Cuba, Laos, and Mongolia and contrasts this with its development of extensive relations with Romania, Yugoslavia, and North Korea.

  • March 10, 1980

    Evaluation of Chinese Policies toward Eastern Europe by the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union

    This document addresses China's alleged bid to undermine the unity of the Socialist countries while maintaining special relations with Romania, Yugoslavia, and North Korea. Chinese foreign policy is seen as interfering in the domestic affairs of the Socialist states. By maintaining contacts with Western countries and by encouraging further armament of NATO, China is undermining the position of the Warsaw Pact. The Soviet evaluation assesses China as an unreliable partner in international relations and advises that all contacts of the Chinese government with foreign organizations or authorities be closely monitored.

  • March 11, 1980

    Hungarian Embassy in the DPRK, Report, 11 March 1980. Subject: Korean-Yugoslav relations.

    Kim Yeong-nam asks for military assistance from and military exchanges with Yugoslavia and discusses plans to send DPRK citizens abroad to study certain industries.

  • June 18, 1980

    East German Record of a Meeting of Delegation Leaders at the Eleventh Interkit Meeting in Poland

    This record of a meeting of the delegation leaders attending the 11th Interkit meeting addresses China's strategy in the area of international relations. The document expresses concern regarding Beijing's policies and calls for unity among the Communist countries. International issues discussed include Soviet-Korean relations, i.e., the Belgrade meeting between Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev and his Korean counterpart Kim Il Sung. Conditions in Albania, Romania, and Yugoslavia, and the positions of these countries within the Communist bloc, are critically assessed. Another topic is the improvement of anti-Maoist propaganda.

  • September 02, 1980

    Telegram from the Hungarian Embassy in Pyongyang, 'KWP's 6th Congress'

    The Hungarian Embassy in Pyongyang reports which foreign delegations the Korean Workers' Party is inviting to its 6th Congress.

  • September 22, 1980

    Telegram from the Hungarian Embassy in Pyongyang, 'The KWP’s 6th Congress'

    The Hungarian Embassy in Pyomgyang reports on the delegations of the Soviet Union, Japan, and Yugoslavia attending the 6th Korean Workers' Party Congress.

  • November 11, 1980

    Telegram from the Hungarian Embassy in Pyongyang, 'Foreign opinions regarding the KWP’s 6th Congress'

    A report on the foreign opinions regarding the KWP's 6th Congress, stating that the North Korean ideology lacks Marxist elements.

  • July 11, 1983

    Information from the Bulgarian Communist Party Regarding the Visit of the Delegation of the Sandinista National Liberation Front (FSLN) to Bulgaria

    Information summarizing the objectives of a visit of the FSLN delegation, headed by Baiardo Arse [name is spelled phonetically], to Bulgaria. The visit, which took place from 28 June to July 3 1983, aimed at exchanging information and ideas on ways to reform FSLN, in order to transform the Front into an avant-garde Marxist-Leninist party. The document describes the political and economic pressure exerted by the Reagan administration on a number of Central and Latin American countries, in order to decrease the support for the Front and other leftist revolutionary movements. According to the information FSLN responded to these measures by consolidating and strengthening its army, and national militia; maintaining transparency and political pluralism; strengthening the cooperative and state economic sector, and redirecting trade to new markets, mainly in the socialist community.

  • February 21, 1984

    Report from Gen. G. Mladenov on Subversive Activities of Military Attaches of NATO, Yugoslavia, and China

  • March 31, 1984

    KGB Report on New Elements in US Policy toward the European Socialist Countries

    Information from the KGB shared with the Stasi about a high-level review of US policy by the Department of State. Presidential Directive [NS-NSDD] 54 from [September] 1982 made the main US objective to subvert Soviet influence in Eastern Europe.

  • September 26, 1986

    Central Intelligence Agency Directorate of Intelligence, 'European Review [Redacted]'

    Brief summaries of intelligence from Europe.

  • February, 1989

    Memorandum to Alexander Yakovlev from the Bogomolov Commission (Marina Sylvanskaya)

    Memorandum to Alexander Yakovlev from the Bogomolov Commission (Marina Sylvanskaya) describing the changes in individual Eastern European countries and their impact on the Soviet Union

  • June 14, 1989

    Conversation between M. S. Gorbachev and FRG Chancellor Helmut Kohl

    Gorbachev and Kohl discuss relations with the United States, Kohl's upcoming visit to Poland, and the status of reforms in various socialist countries.

  • September 08, 1989

    Ambassadors’ Conference at the Austrian Foreign Ministry, Vienna

    Summary of discussion between Austrian Foreign Minister Erich Maximilian Schmid and ambassadors from Belgium, Finland, Yugoslavia, Luxembourg, and Sweden about the state of Eastern Europe, the decline of the arms race, and Western reactions to German Reunification.

  • December 22, 1989

    Record of Conversation with the Ambassador of the SFRY [Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia] in the USSR, Milan Veres

    Record of Conversation with the Ambassador of the SFRY [Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia] in the USSR, Milan Veres regarding the events in Timisoara and the Yugoslav evaluation of these events, as well as Yugoslav concern over the situation

  • November 14, 1991

    Telegram by Ambassador Vento to Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 'Prospects opened by Lord Carrington's mission'

    Italian Ambassador to Belgrade, Vento, offers his initial analysis of Lord Carrington's mission to Belgrade, and the possibility of a peacekeeping mission in Yugoslavia.

  • June, 2007

    Coordination of Soviet and Czechoslovak Intelligence Operations. Folder 80. The Chekist Anthology.

    This folder consists of a detailed operational plan for cooperation between the Czechoslovakian Ministry of Internal Affairs and the KGB for the years 1975-1978. Specific objectives include penetrating the military, political, and economic establishments of the United States, Britain, West Germany, France, and NATO, impeding the activities of the Czech Congress of National Development (KNR), collecting information on “Zionist intrigues,” gathering scientific/technical information on Western achievements in the fields of biological, chemical, and thermonuclear weapons, and using active measures to curtail the activities of Radio Free Europe and Radio Liberty in West Germany.