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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • February 01, 1970

    Letter, Isa Yusuf Alptekin, President of the National Center for the Liberation of Eastern Turkestan, to President Richard Nixon

    Isa Yusuf Alptekin writes to President Nixon to explain the plight of his people and to request assistance.

  • February 06, 1970

    Letter, John M. Murphy, Member of Congress, to the Honorable Richard M. Nixon

    Congressman Murphy forwards a letter and appeal from Isa Yusuf Alptekin to President Nixon.

  • February 06, 1970

    Letter Sent by John M. Murphy, Representative of New York, to President Richard M. Nixon as Attachment to Isa Alptekin's Memorandum

    A copy of the letter sent by John M. Murphy to Richard Nixon, as published in Isa Yusuf Alptekin's Turkish language book "Doğu Türkistan İnsanlıktan Yardım İstiyor" (East Turkistan Expects Help from Humankind).

  • February 17, 1970

    Answer Written by W. E. Timmons, Assisstant Of Richard M. Nixon, the President Of The United States, to John M. Murphy’s Letter

    Answer by William E. Simmons to the letter sent by John M. Murphy about Yusuf Isa Alptekin's memorandum, as published in Isa Yusuf Alptekin's Turkish language book "Doğu Türkistan İnsanlıktan Yardım İstiyor" (East Turkistan Expects Help from Humankind).

  • February 24, 1970

    Memorandum of Conversation, Nixon and Pompidou

    Minutes of a conversation between President Nixon and President Pompidou during the latter's visit to the United States. Nixon states that he wants there to be good relations between the U.S. and France because, despite differences in approach, both countries share the same goals. The two countries were allies and should find common grounds for cooperation even though France wanted to maintain its independence from NATO. Pompidou points out differences with the U.S. in terms of military and nuclear capabilities, and Nixon recognizes the highly secretive nature of such talks which might lead to a better military cooperation between both countries. Next, they discussed how the Soviet Union presented problems for both countries, and that the Soviets must not be allowed to gain an advantage because of any agreements between France and the U.S. It concludes with an overview of the state of affairs with China, the U.S., and an independent France in a world that is progressing forward at a rapid pace since the end of the last war.

  • February 27, 1970

    Note regarding the Polish-Soviet Consultation on the China Topic

    A meeting is proposed for the international departments of the seven parties to meet and discuss issues related to China, including the political and economic situation in Shanghai, China's international activities, and the ideology of its leadership.

  • March, 1970

    Report on the China Problem Following the 9th Party Congress of the Chinese Communist Party

    This study addresses aspects of Chinese domestic and foreign policies after the 9th Congress of the Chinese Communist Party. Internal party disputes and undemocratic structures are said to characterize the Chinese leadership. The document offers an analysis of the socio-political state of affairs in China and states that the delay in economic growth is due to violations of the economic principles of Socialism. As far as its foreign policy is concerned, China is strengthening its military potential; Beijing's intensified relations with Western countries are condemned.

  • March, 1970

    CC CPSU International Department, Note on the China Problem Following the 9th Party Congress of the Chinese Communist Party

    This study addresses aspects of Chinese domestic and foreign policies after the 9th Congress of the Chinese Communist Party. Internal party disputes and undemocratic structures are said to characterize the Chinese leadership. The document offers an analysis of the socio-political state of affairs in China and states that the delay in economic growth is due to violations of the economic principles of Socialism. As far as its foreign policy is concerned, China is strengthening its military potential; Beijing's intensified relations with Western countries are condemned.

  • March 03, 1970

    Hon. John M. Murphy of New York, in the House of Representatives, 'Isa Yusuf Alptekin--Defender of Freedom'

    Congressman Murphy introduces Isa Yusuf Alptekin on the House floor, describing him as an "eloquent defender of freedom."

  • March 10, 1970

    East German Report on the Third Interkit Meeting in Warsaw, March 1970

    This East German report, issued after the Interkit meeting in Warsaw, addresses the situation in China under the leadership of Mao Zedong. Among the issues discussed are the ninth congress of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) and Mao's anti-Soviet foreign policy, especially China's relations with the US and West Germany. The ninth congress of the CCP is said to have stabilized Mao's position and is seen as the founding congress of a new party. Among other topics, the delegates also discuss ways to improve anti-Maoist propaganda.

  • March 10, 1970

    Embassy of the GDR in the PR China, 'First Assessment of the Course of the Chinese Leadership “Preparation for a Scenario of War and a Scenario of Disaster, Everything for the People”'

    This document contains the East German (GDR) Embassy in China’s summary and preliminary evaluation of Chinese foreign policy aimed at achieving super power status, domestic militarization in China, and efforts to foster political unity around Maoist ideology.

  • March 12, 1970

    Memorandum for Mr. Henry A. Kissinger, the White House, from Theodore L. Eliot, Jr.

    Theodore Eliot advises Henry Kissinger that "the United States should avoid becoming involved in an issue which could seriously damage our efforts to improve relations with Peking."

  • March 19, 1970

    Report from the Meeting of Seven Parties on the China Issue

    A review of the 10-12 March meeting during which the CC International Departments discussed the China issue. A great deal of time was spent discussing whether or not China was still a socialist country. A "Protocol Note" was unanimously adopted as a result of the meeting.

  • April, 1970

    Information from Krum Bosev, Charge d’Affairs of the Bulgarian Embassy in Beijing, 'The Chinese Position on the Cambodian Events'

    Bosey reports on Chinese policy regarding Cambodia following the March 1970 coup and removal of Prince Norodom Sihanouk.

  • April 07, 1970

    Minutes of the Meeting of the Political Committee, April, 1970

    Discussion of the political situation in China; border issues with the Soviet Union; foreign relations, such as those with Albania, Japan, the GDR and Bulgaria; the political isolation of China; and the organization of the political party in China.

  • April 10, 1970

    Letter, UNCURK Principal Secretary Kuzbari to UN Chef de Cabinet Narasimhan

    Principal Secretary of UNCURK Kuzbari updates Chef de Cabinet of the UN C.V. Narasimhan on the JAL flight hijacking incident's implications on ROK-Japan relations, UN Command and DPRK meeting on Armistice violations, and renewed DMZ incidents.

  • April 24, 1970

    Letter, UNCURK Principal Secretary Kuzbari to UN Chef de Cabinet Narasimhan, Joint Communique between DPRK and PRC

    The joint communique issued by the governments of the DPRK and PRC stressed the strengthening alliance between the two countries, the U.S. as the main agressor, the hope for reunification of the Koreas and Chinas, and the condemnation of U.S. involvement in Southeast Asia, Africa, and the Middle East.

  • May 05, 1970

    Report, Embassy of Hungary in North Korea to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    The embassy of Hungary in North Korea reports on a recent discussion with Soviet Ambassador Sudarikov, who commented on Chinese-North Korean relations and the situation in Cambodia.

  • May 05, 1970

    Minutes of the Meeting of the Political Committee, 5 May 1970

    Discusses Chinese-Hungarian Foreign Relations, their history, trade, and issues a resolution for future interactions between the two states.

  • May 27, 1970

    Foreign Minister, Department of Political Affairs, Asia-Oceania, Note, 'Polish Opinion about Chinese Policy'

    The Secretary of the Polish Embassy in Paris offers his views on Sino-Soviet relations in the context of developments in the Vietnam War.