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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • 1954

    Introduction to 'The Private Enterprise Plan'

    Described as a plan for "the revitalization of capitalism at home and abroad" through conservative policies.

  • 1954

    Department of State, Memorandum, 'The Attitude of the United States and Other Governments Toward the Forced Incorporation of the Baltic Republics into the Soviet Union'

    State Department memorandum summarizing policy toward Lithuania, Latvia, and Estonia following the Soviet incorporation of the Baltic States.

  • February 26, 1954

    CIA Review of Radio Liberty Broadcasting

    A CIA memorandum reviews Radio Liberty policy guidance to date and outlines how it differs from the Voice of America.

  • March 02, 1954

    'Preliminary Opinions on the Assessment of and Preparation for the Geneva Conference,' Prepared by the PRC Ministry of Foreign Affairs (drafted by PRC Premier and Foreign Minister Zhou Enlai) [Excerpt]

    Zhou discusses the need to make agreements at the Geneva conference in order to open a path for discussion and negotiation with the west. Zhou notes that because the US, France and Britain are not united in their opinions, the CCP must hold fast to their positions on the peaceful unification of Korea, and of peace in Indochina. Finally, Zhou suggests that the CCP prepare to discuss issues of trade, relaxing international tensions, and breaking the US embargo, although these issues are not on the agenda.

  • March 06, 1954

    From the Journal of Molotov: Secret Memorandum of Conversation between Molotov and PRC Ambassador Zhang Wentian

    Soviet Foreign Minister Molotov and PRC Ambassador to the USSR Zhang Wentian discuss their respective views on the situations in Korea and Vietnam in preparation for the upcoming Geneva Conference.

  • March 08, 1954

    International Organizations Division, History of the Efforts on the Part of the American Committee to Establish Large Scale Radio Activities

    An International Organizations Division memorandum reviews the history of AMCOMLIB efforts to organize radio broadcasts, noting that they became the primary AMCOMLIB activity only after issuance of the Jackson Committee report in September 1953.

  • March 20, 1954

    Letter, Ralph Handelman to Chang Soo Yoo

    Korean-American Purchasing & Sales President Ralph Handelman expresses disappointment with Chang Soo Yoo.

  • March 26, 1954

    Molotov's Proposal that the USSR Join NATO, March 1954

    In this memorandum to the Soviet Presidium, Foreign Minister Molotov proposes that the Soviet Union publicly state its willingness to consider joining NATO. He explains that the proposal is intended to disrupt the formation of the European Defense Community and the rearmament of West Germany, and also limit the United State's influence in Europe.

  • April 04, 1954

    Draft Memorandum, 'A Comprehensive Solution for Restoring Peace in Indochina,' Prepared by the Vietnam Group of the Chinese Delegation Attending the Geneva Conference

    The Vietnam group of the Chinese delegation offers a solution involving peaceful unification within Cambodia, Laos, and Vietnam, so that these nations can govern themselves as independent, sovereign states.

  • April 12, 1954

    CIA Criticism of American Committee for Liberation Mission Statement

    CIA official Thomas Braden, now responsible for Radio Liberty, criticizes American Committee for Liberation (AMCOMLIB) president Stevens’ enclosed mission statement as overemphasizing émigré politics and neglecting communication with the people of the Soviet Union.

  • April 21, 1954

    Revised American Committee for Liberation Mission Statement

    A revised AMCOMLIB Mission Statement reflects Thomas Braden’s critique in his April 12, 1954 memorandum ["CIA Criticism of American Committee for Liberation Mission Statement"]

  • May 01, 1954

    Cable from Zhou Enlai, 'Regarding a Meeting with British Foreign Secretary Eden'

    Zhou Enlai, Molotov, and Eden discuss the Korea issue, the Indochina issue, Sino-British relations, British-American relations, and the issue of five powers.

  • May 09, 1954

    Cable from Zhou Enlai, 'Regarding the Situation of the First Plenary Session'

    Zhou Enlai recaps the Indochina discussion that took place at the Geneva conference. Participants discussed a ceasefire, and supervision by an international committee. Enlai notes that his suggestion to invite the resistance governments in Laos and Cambodia to attend the conference produced debate.

  • May 12, 1954

    Telegram, Zhou Enlai to Mao Zedong and Others, Regarding the Second Plenary Session (Excerpt)

    Zhou Enlai reports mainly on the second session of the Indochina issue. Participants are divided on the issue of a ceasefire. The Republic of Vietnam's Pham Van Dong agrees that the releasing of sick and wounded POWs will include both French and Vietnamese troops.

  • May 13, 1954

    Letter, John W. Staggers to Syngman Rhee

    John W. Stagger met with representative Shafer about Resolution 219 and the proposed Private Enterprise Plan.

  • May 18, 1954

    Press Release, 'Visiting of US Governors'

    Between May 24-29, four US Governors (Colorado, Texas, Pennsylvania, and Oklahoma) will travel to South Korea to observe the development of US and United Nations rehabilitation programs in South Korea.

  • May 19, 1954

    Minutes of the Talk between Huan Xiang and Humphrey Trevelyan on the Return of Chinese and US Nationals to Their Respective Countries (Excerpt)

    Trevelyan offered to mediate the issue of Chinese and American expatriates as a private person. Huan Xiang replied by affirming that US nationals were free to leave China while many Chinese were not allowed to leave the US. He declared to have no authority on the mediation request and would consult with related people.

  • May 27, 1954

    Minutes of the Talk between Huan Xiang and Trevelyan on the Return of Chinese and US Nationals to their Respective Countries (Excerpt)

    Huan Xiang reaffirmed that Beijing did not deny exit permits for Americans while the US prevented many Chinese nationals from leaving the US. He agreed to talk to the US either directly or through Trevelyan's introduction. Trevelyan said that he did not know the US attitude on this issue and would contact Huan Xian in a few days.

  • May 30, 1954

    Telegram, Zhou Enlai to Mao Zedong and Others, Regarding the Situation at the Eighth Restricted Session

    Zhou reports on the restrictive session on Indochina. Participating countries agreed to a three-point proposal regarding peace in Indochina.

  • June 03, 1954

    Telegram From Zhou Enlai to Mao Zedong and Liu Shaoqi, on the Issue of the US Asking China to Release Convicted US Nationals in China

    Zhou Enlai gave a brief overview of the situation, in which he pointed out that there seemed to be disagreements between the US delegation in Geneva and the State Department over whether to talk directly with the PRC delegation. Zhou outlined what the PRC should do if either case materialized.