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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • July 17, 1954

    From the Journal of Molotov: Top Secret Memorandum of Conversation with Zhou Enlai and Pham Van Dong

    Soviet Foreign Minister Vyacheslav M. Molotov, Chinese Premier Zhou Enlai, and Vietnamese Vice-Premier Pham Van Dong discuss various topics relevant to the Geneva Convention, including the construction of foreign military bases in Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia, the line of demarcation between North and South Vietnam, the establishment of regrouping zones in northeast Laos, the withdrawal of foreign troops from Indochina, and the possible formation of an international supervisory commission.

  • July 19, 1954

    Telegram, Zhou Enlai to Mao Zedong and Others, Regarding the Situation at the Twenty-third Restricted Session

    Zhou reports on the 23rd restricted session on Indochina. The delegates of the conference hope to make an agreement on the 20th. Zhou notes that both the Chinese/Russian side and the other side have begun to make compromises, however Bao Dai's Vietnamese delegation refused to the division of Vietnam.

  • July 22, 1954

    American Committee for Liberation Mission Statement Criticized

    CIA official Richard Bissell criticizes the April 21, 1954, AMCOMLIB mission statement ["Revised American Committee for Liberation Mission Statement"], now endorsed by the State Department, as postulating far reaching goals without identifying the means necessary to achieve them.

  • July 22, 1954

    US Government Policy for Radio Free Europe and Radio Liberty

    An annex to the Operations Coordinating Board (OCB) “169 Study” on U.S. international communications reviews the goals and effectiveness of Radio Free Europe and Radio Liberty.

  • July 27, 1954

    Telegram, CCP Central Committee to Zhou Enlai, Concerning Policies and Measures in the Struggle against the United States and Jiang Jieshi after the Geneva Conference

    In this telegram, the CCP discusses policies and measures taken to break up the US-Chiang treaty, and to liberate Taiwan. The CCP describes its propaganda efforts and efforts to enhance naval and air forces.

  • July 29, 1954

    Memorandum of Conversation, between Soviet Premier Georgy M. Malenkov and Zhou Enlai

    Soviet Premier Georgy M. Malenkov and Chinese Premier Zhou Enlai discuss the incidents between China and Taiwan, the US’s support of Taiwan, and the US bloc in the South Pacific. They contemplate various means through which China could prevent further provocations by Taiwan and how to break apart the American bloc. Zhou Enlai also offers suggestions concerning the elections in Korea that would help accomplish Soviet goals for the area.

  • July 30, 1954

    American Committee for Liberation's Mission Redefined

    CIA official Thomas Braden restates American Committee for Liberation's redefined mission which puts American staff and not exile leaders in charge of exile broadcasters.

  • September 04, 1954

    Chinese Foreign Ministry Intelligence Department Report on the Asian-African Conference

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry reported Indonesia’s intention to hold the Asian-African Conference, its attitude towards the Asian-African Conference, and the possible development of the Conference.

  • October 19, 1954

    Minutes of Chairman Mao Zedong’s First Meeting with Nehru

    Mao Zedong and Nehru discuss Sino-Indian relations, the political situation in Asia, and the role of the United States in world politics.

  • October 19, 1954

    Minutes of the First Meeting between Premier Zhou Enlai and Nehru

    Zhou Enlai and Nehru discuss French and Portuguese colonialism in India and China, the Sino-American conflict, conflict in the Taiwan Straits, and the China issue at the United Nations.

  • October 20, 1954

    Excerpt from Premier Zhou Enlai's Second Meeting with Nehru

    Zhou and Nehru ponder American foreign policy and whether the US wants "to create tension."

  • October 20, 1954

    Minutes of the Second Meeting between Premier Zhou Enlai and Nehru

    Zhou and Nehru continue to discuss the regional situations in Asia and Africa and the overarching foreign policy views of China and India.

  • October 21, 1954

    Talking Points from Premier Zhou Enlai’s Third Meeting with Nehru

    Zhou Enlai and Nehru discuss Sino-Indian relations, as well as China and India's views toward Thailand, Indonesia, Korea, Vietnam, and Ceylon (Sri Lanka).

  • October 23, 1954

    Letter, W. F. Marquat to James Cromwell

    Major General M. F. Marquat endorses James Cromwell's "Private Enterprise Plan."

  • November 06, 1954

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, ‘Premier Zhou’s Talk with Members of Japan’s Diet’

    Zhou Enlai and Japanese Diet Members discuss Japan's relationship with the United States, the overall trends in Sino-Japanese relations, and some specific issues in Sino-Japanese relations, such as war criminals, fisheries, and communications.

  • December 07, 1954

    Department of State, Memorandum, 'Problems of Compatibility of Collective Security Negotiations with the USSR and Present US Policy Towards the Baltic States'

    History of US relations with the Baltic states and the current policy of non-recognition of Soviet control.

  • December 15, 1954

    Report from the Asia Section, Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'On the Asian-African Conference'

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry reported that Indonesia’s intention to hold the Asian-African Conference was to establish a neutral, third group to counter the US and the Soviet Union. It also reported the attitudes of the invited countries and the reactions of the Western countries toward the Conference. It concluded that it would be beneficial for China to participate in the Conference and to influence the political situation in the Conference.

  • December 22, 1954

    Soviet Translation, 'Statement of the Iran Party Regarding the Bill to Receive a Loan from Foreign Countries' (Attachment)

    The Iran Party's statement is critical of the recent loans made to Iran by the Americans and the British, which it believes will leave Iran indebted to countries that just want to exploit the people and resources of Iran. Also includes various Iranian trade figures.

  • December 25, 1954

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Regarding Our Attitude towards the Afro-Asian Conference'

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry informed Chinese embassies overseas that China supported the Asian-African Conference as well as the participation of the countries with whom China had no diplomatic relation, such as Japan, the Philippines, and Thailand. China also emphasized that Chiang Kai-shek was not to be invited to the Conference.

  • December 29, 1954

    Cable from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs Intelligence Department, 'The Agenda of the Five Southeast Asian Countries from the Bogor Conference and the Five Countries’ Attitudes towards China’s Participation in the Afro-Asian Conference '

    The agenda of the Bogor Conference was to determine the purposes, timing, and participants of the Asian-African Conference. The five Southeast Asian countries agreed that China and Japan should participate in the Asian-African Conference, but some countries also insisted on the participation of US allies such as Thailand and the Philippines.