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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • September 20, 1990

    Final Report by Ambassador Bauer, '4 ½ Years in Bonn; Attempt on Prospects'

    The document discesses the coalition between Austria and newly united Germany. It highlights the similar political views the countries shares and stresses its economic conflicts. The document continues weighing how to best unite Germany economically and its possible effects on the European Union. It ends with a commitment to ensuring Germany enters the European Union as an equal member.

  • December 01, 1990

    National Intelligence Daily for Friday, 1 December 1989

    The CIA’s National Intelligence Daily for Friday, 1 December 1989 describes the latest developments in Eastern Europe, USSR, Taiwan, Italy, Iran and Bulgaria.

  • June 29, 1991

    National Intelligence Daily for Saturday, 29 June 1991

    The CIA’s National Intelligence Daily for 29 June 1991 describes the latest developments in Yugoslavia, Iraq, Kuwait, the Soviet Union, PLO, Jordan, Ethiopia, Germany, Poland, Netherlands, Togo, Czechoslovakia, and Lebanon.

  • June 29, 1991

    National Intelligence Daily for Saturday, 29 June 1991

    The CIA’s National Intelligence Daily for 29 June 1991 describes the latest developments in Yugoslavia, Iraq, Kuwait, the Soviet Union, Palestine, Jordan, Ethiopia, Germany, Poland, Netherlands, Togo, Czechoslovakia and Lebanon.

  • September 16, 1991

    From the Interview by the Honorary Chairman of the SPD, Brandt, with Die Welt

    Willy Brandt's interview with Die Welt on unified Germany and the break-up of the Soviet Union.

  • May 13, 1994

    Cable, U.S. Embassy, Bonn, to the Secretaries of State and Defense, 'May 12 Kohl/Yeltsin Talks'

    A German official relays a summary of the talks between Helmut Kohl and Boris Yeltsin to Richard Holbrooke.

  • September 10, 1994

    Cable, U.S. Embassy Office Berlin to the Secretary of State, 'Chancellor Kohl: NATO and EU Enlargement: The Future of Europe'

    Richard Holbrooke recounts a final meeting with with German Chancellor Helmut Kohl prior to leaving Germany. Kohl asked the Clinton Administration "to increase its involvement in the ongoing effort to chart the future of Europe," and called for the expansion of NATO and the EU.

  • February 08, 1995

    German Bundestag, 13th Legislative Period, Proposal for 'Indefinite and Unconditional Extension of the Non-Proliferation Treaty'

    Proposal for extension of NPT and related steps for the German federal government to take to support non-proliferation.

  • February 15, 1995

    Memorandum for Kenneth C. Brill from Andrew D. Sens, 'Memorandum of Conversation of the President's Expanded Meeting with Chancellor Kohl of Germany'

    Kohl and Clinton have a wide ranging discussion on NATO expansion, crises in the Balkans, Chechnya and Northern Africa, relations with Europe, and other subjects.

  • June 15, 1995

    German Bundestag, 12th Legislative Period, 'Printed Matter 12/5116--Resolution Recommendation and Report of the Foreign Relations Committee (3rd Committee)'

    Resolution for the extension of the Non-proliferation Treaty and setting goals for NPT policy.

  • June 29, 1995

    German Bundestag, 13th Legislative Period, 'Response of the Federal Government to the Small Inquiry of the SPD faction—Printed Matter 13/1455—Strengthening the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons'

    Review of steps taken by the German federal government to limit proliferation of nuclear weapons.

  • July 24, 1997

    Memorandum for Glyn T. Davies from Alexander Vershbow, 'Memorandum of Conversation between the President and President Herzog of Germany'

    Clinton and Herzog discuss NATO expansion and U.S. relations with Romania, Ukraine, and other states in Europe. Herzog cautions against Romania immediately joining NATO.

  • April, 2004

    STASI German/Russian Lexicon of Intelligence Terms Introduction

    This compact German-Russian dictionary came to light in 1967. The dictionary is anonymous: it has no indication of title, authorship, publisher, place and date of publication - there are no indications at all. On reading through it, it is clear that it contains Cheka terminology, and was compiled after 1954. When translated into Russian, these terms were to assist operational officers working in the USSR KGB Establishment attached to the GDR MfS [Ministerium für Staatssicherheit] - helping them to read secret German-language materials supplied in great quantities by the GDR MfS [2], sent on to the Centre with a cover note, and to carry on conversations on Chekist themes with their German colleagues.

  • June, 2007

    The Ezhov Case. Folder 85. The Chekist Anthology

    In this entry, Mitrokhin gives an account of KGB operative Peter Yots (codename “Ingo” or “Ezhov”), and his assignments within the FRG. The KGB file presents a brief biographical sketch of Yots who was born in 1937 in Berlin, and was trained as an electrical technician who specialized in deciphering coded radio transmissions and telegrams. Drawing upon KGB files, Mitrokhin asserts that Yots worked as an agent in the First Chief Directorate which sent him to West Germany in 1961 to fulfill the aims of operation “Glavnoiie.” The operation, according to the file, required Yots to monitor the movement of FRG forces and military equipment at the “Aizedlerhoff” railroad station. Yots was, nonetheless, soon relocated to Nuremberg where he took up a job as a lighting technician at a local theater. Between 1962 and 1964, Yots contributed to operation “Delta” from the island of Nidervert off the coast of Nuremberg. The KGB account relates that Yots was authorized by the First Chief Directorate to use necessary means to intercept telegraph messages and other communications, so as to inflict “maximum damage” upon the enemy. In 1967, Yots was relocated to Munich, where he became employed as a lighting technician at a local television station. One of Yots’ Munich missions, codenamed “Zarevo,” involved carrying out the surveillance of the “Alley Café”—a bar owned by Adolf and Mariette Laimer which was frequented by Americans. The KGB entry mentions that Yots also monitored the U.S Consulate and all surrounding public venues which attracted American diplomats and personnel. Yots was relocated by the First Chief Directorate to Czechoslovakia on August 2, 1968 but returned to Munich in 1969.

  • June, 2007

    The Conrad Case. Folder 72. The Chekist Anthology

    In this folder Mitrokhin describes the work experience of German KGB agent Conrad (codename “Gregor”), his experience as a spy, involvement with communist parties in different countries, and activities as the head of military sabotage groups in Western Europe.

  • June, 2007

    The Kardinal and Mavr Case. Folder 94. The Chekist Anthology.

    In this entry, Mitrokhin draws upon KGB files to describe “Kardinal” (formerly “Lord”)-Lothar Schwartz (b. 1928), a member of the Socialist Democratic Party of Germany, and a citizen of the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG).

  • November 14, 2016

    Oral History Interview with Uta Zapf

    Chairperson of the subcommittee for "Disarmament, Arms Control, and Nonproliferation" of the Foreign Affairs Committee of the German Bundestag.

  • August 29, 2017

    Oral History Interview with Konrad Scharinger

    Deputy head of the nuclear non-proliferation section of the economic department in the German Federal Foreign Office.