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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • June 21, 1975

    Conversation between Chinese leader Mao Zedong and Cambodian Leader Pol Pot

    Mao Zedong muses on the nature of the struggle between the capitalist and socialist forces within China. He tells Pol Pot not to blindly follow the Chinese model, but adopt Marxist theory to the Cambodian realities. Excepts.

  • June 21, 1975

    Conversation Record of Chairman Mao Zedong’s Meeting with Pol Pot, Secretary of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of Kampuchea

    This records contains the full transcript of the talks between Mao and Pol Pot (an excerpt was originally published in CWIHP Working Paper #22, '77 Conversations between Chinese and Foreign Leaders on the Wars in Indochina'). Mao Zedong muses on the nature of the struggle between the capitalist and socialist forces within China. He tells Pol Pot not to blindly follow the Chinese model, but adopt Marxist theory to the Cambodian realities.

  • July 25, 1975

    Prime Minister Miki – President Ford Meeting Discussion Outline

    An extensive overview of international issues bearing on the US-Japan relationship, including the situations in the Korean Peninsula, Vietnam, and Indonesia.

  • July 30, 1975

    Report, Embassy of Hungary in North Korea to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    Hungarian report on Sino-Korean relations. China is wary of a second Korean War, whereas Kim Il Sung makes it clear that military force is an option. Military technology and equipment were also made available to Kim Il Sung on his foreign relations tour.

  • August 01, 1975

    A Relayed Note from Comrade G. Ragulin

    Outlines the results of a meeting in Ulaanbaatar where specific measures were given to deal with the anti-Sovietism and Maoism in China.

  • September 06, 1975

    Note regarding the Meeting between Ilie Verdeț and Ji Denggui

    Ji Denggui and Ilie Verdeț discuss bilateral relations between China and Romania, nuclear proliferation and diarmament, Soviet-American relations, Comecon, European security, US policy toward Taiwan, Japan-Soviet relations, and economic development in China and Romania, among other topics.

  • September 10, 1975

    Letter, Ewald Moldt to the Deputy of the Minister, Ministry for Foreign Affairs, Council of Ministers of the German Democratic Republic

    A letter appended to a working directive for GDR representatives in China in their efforts to further develop Sino-East German Relations.

  • September 10, 1975

    Ministry for Foreign Affairs of the GDR, Far East Department, 'Information about Current Problems of the Domestic and Foreign Policy of the PR China'

    A report by the East German Ministry of Foreign Affairs, discussing the shifting anti-Socialist and anti-Soviet attitudes amongst Chinese leadership. The majority of focus is given to China's military and foreign policy, specifically their efforts to strengthen military capabilities and their claims to territories held by neighboring states.

  • September 10, 1975

    Letter to the GDR Council of Ministers, 'Information about Recent Issues of PRC Domestic and Foreign Policy – Directives for the Code of Conduct of GDR Representatives towards the Representatives of the PR China'

    In the midst of China's apparent "struggle against Maoism," East German diplomats review Chinese foreign and domestic policies and the state of bilateral relations.

  • September 17, 1975

    Telegram from L.L Mehrotra, Charge d’Affaires in Beijing

    Report from New Zealand's Ambassador to China on a conversation between New Zealand’s Press Delegation and Vice Premier Teng Hsia-ping. They discussed China's policies on opposing nuclear proliferation.

  • September 17, 1975

    Telegram from L.L Mehrotra, Charge d’Affaires in Beijing

    China’s stance on Asian collective security and India-Soviet relations

  • September 29, 1975

    Minutes of Conversation between Deng Xiaoping and Le Duan

    Deng Xiaoping recounts a meeting between Zhou Enlai and Ho Chi Minh, at which Ho Chi Minh accused the Chinese of attempting to intimidate the Vietnamese by stationing troops close to the Chinese-Vietnamese border. Le Duan states that he had never been brifed on that meeting. Excerpt.

  • October 09, 1975

    Memorandum for the Record by Helmut Sonnenfeldt, 'Conversation with Delpech'

    Description of conversation between Sonnenfeldt and Jean-Laurens Delpech, French Minister of Armaments, on October 7. Delpech asked about the status of US nuclear assistance to France. He specifically asks about French requests for testing of reentry vehicle material in US nuclear tests, the importation of advanced computers, technical assistance with booster trigger design, and information on submarine vulnerabilities. Other topics included the French sale of helicopters to China and the potential sale of ECM equipment to Arab states.

  • October 15, 1975

    Minister of Foreign Affairs Miyazawa – Secretary of State Kissinger Meeting Discussion Outline

    Miyazawa's talking points on inter-Korean relations, China's influence over North Korea, and the Korean debate at the United Nations for a meeting with Henry Kissinger.

  • October 15, 1975

    Intelligence Note, Polish Embassy in Bucharest, 'Regarding Revival of Relations Between Romania and the PRC'

    The Polish Embassy in Bucharest reports on increasing high level meetings between Romanian and Chinese officials. In their analysis, "Romanians intend to ease discontent, that has clearly appeared on the Chinese side and consistently implement the principle of balancing political relations with the Soviet Union, China and other socialist countries – to make the situation more stable."

  • October 21, 1975

    Memorandum of Conversation between Mao Zedong and Henry A. Kissinger

    U.S. Secretary of State Henry Kissinger met Chairman Mao at his residence in Peking. The two argued about the importance of U.S.-Chinese relations in American politics. Mao repeats that the United States' concerns order America, the Soviet Union, Europe, Japan, and lastly China. Kissinger responds that the Soviet Union, as a superpower, is frequently dealt with, but in strategy China is a priority. Throughout the conversation, Mao continues to point out his old age and failing health. The leaders also discuss European unity, Japanese hegemony, German reunification, and the New York Times.

  • October 23, 1975

    Telegram from Pyongyang to Bucharest, No. 059.298

    Pope discusses DPRK representatives' attempt to establish contacts with Henry Kissinger via China as Heo Dam is scheduled to meet Henry Kissinger after the latter's visit to Beijing.

  • October 30, 1975

    Conversation between Federal Chancellor Schmidt and the Chairman of the Central Committee and the Politburo of the Chinese Communist Party, Mao Zedong, in Beijing

    Federal Chancellor Schmidt and Mao Zedong discuss the potential for attack by the Soviet Union and European security.

  • October 31, 1975

    Conversation between Federal Chancellor Schmidt and Chinese Deputy Prime Minister Deng Xiaoping in Beijing

    Schmidt and Deng Xiaoping discuss Soviet nuclear capabilities and threats to other countries. Deng Xiaoping expresses his desire to continue these conversations.

  • December 02, 1975

    Memorandum of Conversation between Mao Zedong and Gerald R. Ford

    President Ford and Secretary Kissinger met with Chairman Mao and spoke about Chinese-U.S. relations, Japanese-U.S. relations, Chinese foreign relations with Japan and Western countries, NATO, the Sinai Agreement, and Soviet attempts to expand influence in Africa.