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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • December 01, 1979

    Conversation between Jambyn Batmunkh and Le Duan

    In December 1979 Mongolian party and government delegation headed by the Chairman of the Council of Ministers of Mongolia Jambyn Batmunkh visited Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos and had held talks with the leaders of these countries on issues pertinent to the Sino-Vietnamese war of 1979, Pol Pot’s regime, situation in Indochina and Chinese foreign policy in Asia.

  • December, 1979

    The Capability of the Puppet Regime to Launch an Attack on the South: A Comprehensive Analysis

    South Korean Ministry of Foreign Affairs Information and Cultural Bureau reports on the current situation and information regarding the risk of a North Korea attack, North Korea's military capabilities, and the definiteness of a possible of a North Korean invasion.

  • December 02, 1979

    Conversation between Jambyn Batmunkh and Pham Van Dong

    In December 1979 Mongolian party and government delegation headed by the Chairman of the Council of Ministers of Mongolia Jambyn Batmunkh visited Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos and had held talks with the leaders of these countries on issues pertinent to the Sino-Vietnamese war of 1979, Pol Pot’s regime, situation in Indochina and Chinese foreign policy in Asia.

  • December 04, 1979

    Conversation between Jambyn Batmunkh and Heng Samrin

    In December 1979 Mongolian party and government delegation headed by the Chairman of the Council of Ministers of Mongolia Jambyn Batmunkh visited Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos and had held talks with the leaders of these countries on issues pertinent to the Sino-Vietnamese war of 1979, Pol Pot’s regime, situation in Indochina and Chinese foreign policy in Asia.

  • December 06, 1979

    Conversation between Jambyn Batmunkh and Kaysone Phomvihane

    In December 1979 Mongolian party and government delegation headed by the Chairman of the Council of Ministers of Mongolia Jambyn Batmunkh visited Laos and had held talks with the leaders of these countries on issues pertinent to the Sino-Vietnamese war of 1979, Chinese aggressive foreign policy in Asia.

  • December 06, 1979

    Conversation between Jambyn Batmunkh and Kaysone Phomvihane

    In December 1979 Mongolian party and government delegation headed by the Chairman of the Council of Ministers of Mongolia Jambyn Batmunkh visited Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos and had held talks with the leaders of these countries on issues pertinent to the Sino-Vietnamese war of 1979, Pol Pot’s regime, situation in Indochina and Chinese foreign policy in Asia.

  • December 07, 1979

    Deputy Director for National Foreign Assessment, Central Intelligence Agency, Enclosing Report, 'A Review of the Evidence of Chinese Involvement in Pakistan’s Nuclear Weapons Program'

    With nuclear proliferation a policy priority for the Jimmy Carter administration, and Pakistan already a special concern, the possibility that China and Pakistan were sharing nuclear weapons-related information began was beginning to worry US government officials. They had no hard evidence--and the soft evidence that concerned them is massively excised in the December 1979 report just as Beijing and Washington were normalizing relations—so the “precise nature and extent of this cooperation is uncertain.”

  • December 18, 1979

    Report submitted by General Wang Sheng (Director of the General Political Warfare Department, Ministry of National Defense, Taiwan) to President Chiang Ching-kuo regarding General Wang’s visit to the Philippines, 18 December 1979

    General Sheng Wang briefs President Chiang Ching-kuo on his conversation with President Fernand Marcos on Taiwan-Philippines cooperation against China.

  • December 20, 1979

    Antonio Rubbi, 'Note Reserved for Comrade Berlinguer'

    This note from Antonio Rubbi to Enrico Berlinquer is dated December 20, 1979, and regards the invitation of the Central Committee of the Chinese Communist Party to the Italian Communist Party for the PCI Secretary General to visit China.

  • December 27, 1979

    Declaration of the CC CPSU to the Party Leadership concerning the Situation in Afghanistan, Attachment to CPSU Politburo Protocol #177

    The CC CPSU states that the removal of N. M Taraki, and the rise of H. Amin to political leadership in Afghanistan bolstered counterrevolutionaries. The CC CPSU approved a small military force to stabilize the country, supporting the regional and international interests of Soviet involvement in Afghanistan. The message is sent to the Members and Candidate Members of the CC CPSU, the Members of the CPSU Central Auditing Commission, the CC of the Communist Parties Of Union Republics, Kray Committees, and Oblast Committees of the Party, The Moscow City Committee of the CPSU, the Leningrad City Committee of the CPSU, and the Main Political Directorate of the Soviet Army and Soviet Navy.

  • 1980

    CC CPSU Information on Chinese Foreign Policy Issues

    Discusses the joint efforts by Chinese and American leaders to promote a better relationship between these two countries, at the expense of the Soviet Union and of communism. The U.S. seems to be trying to capitalize on a growing “internal stability” in China, and the U.S. is even now selling equipment to China. The Soviet Union does not believe that this alliance will prove powerful enough to significantly impair other Socialist countries, but their alliance should also not be ignored.

  • January 18, 1980

    Telegram from the Romanian Embassy in Pyongyang to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, January 18, 1980, 057025, Secret

    A summary of South Korean President Choi Kyu-ha's annual conference, regarding the unstable domestic situation after President Park Chung Hee's assassination, diplomatic relations with countries including US, Japan and ASEAN members, as well as North Korea's proposal to discuss the reunification question.

  • January 20, 1980

    'Some Ideas About Foreign Policy Results of the 1970s (Points)' of Academician O. Bogomolov of the Institute of the Economy of the World Socialist System sent to the CC CPSU and the KGB

    Summary of the affects of Soviet military intervention in Afghanistan.

  • February, 1980

    Polish Record of Soviet alliance Meeting in Moscow, February 1980

    Discusses the growing aggression seen in China and the effects of its closer relationship with the United States.

  • February 01, 1980

    CPSU CC Politburo Decision

  • February 16, 1980

    Ciphered Telegram, Embassy of Hungary in India to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    A report from the Hungarian Embassy in India explaining that in the view of the Indian government, the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan threatens regional stability as it could invite American and/or Chinese intervention.

  • February 16, 1980

    Ciphered Telegram No. 43, Embassy of Hungary in India to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    A report from the Hungarian Embassy in India explaining that in the view of the Indian government, the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan threatens regional stability as it could invite American and/or Chinese intervention.

  • March 01, 1980

    Telegram, Embassy of Hungary in North Korea to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    A conversation with the Chinese ambassador on the Chinese population in the DPRK and China-ROK relationship

  • March 04, 1980

    CPSU CC Directive to Soviet Ambassadors in Communist Countries, Instructions 'About the China Question'

    Instructions to Soviet ambassadors on dealing with China's outreach to socialist countries in the eastern bloc, outlining a series of steps for Soviet ambassadors to follow which would foster skepticism about China’s intentions and thwart efforts by Chinese representatives to make wide-ranging contacts in these states. The directive notes China’s hostility to Vietnam, Cuba, Laos, and Mongolia and contrasts this with its development of extensive relations with Romania, Yugoslavia, and North Korea.

  • March 10, 1980

    Evaluation of Chinese Policies toward Eastern Europe by the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union

    This document addresses China's alleged bid to undermine the unity of the Socialist countries while maintaining special relations with Romania, Yugoslavia, and North Korea. Chinese foreign policy is seen as interfering in the domestic affairs of the Socialist states. By maintaining contacts with Western countries and by encouraging further armament of NATO, China is undermining the position of the Warsaw Pact. The Soviet evaluation assesses China as an unreliable partner in international relations and advises that all contacts of the Chinese government with foreign organizations or authorities be closely monitored.