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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • September 04, 1954

    Chinese Foreign Ministry Intelligence Department Report on the Asian-African Conference

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry reported Indonesia’s intention to hold the Asian-African Conference, its attitude towards the Asian-African Conference, and the possible development of the Conference.

  • October 19, 1954

    Minutes of Chairman Mao Zedong’s First Meeting with Nehru

    Mao Zedong and Nehru discuss Sino-Indian relations, the political situation in Asia, and the role of the United States in world politics.

  • October 19, 1954

    Minutes of the First Meeting between Premier Zhou Enlai and Nehru

    Zhou Enlai and Nehru discuss French and Portuguese colonialism in India and China, the Sino-American conflict, conflict in the Taiwan Straits, and the China issue at the United Nations.

  • October 20, 1954

    Excerpt from Premier Zhou Enlai's Second Meeting with Nehru

    Zhou and Nehru ponder American foreign policy and whether the US wants "to create tension."

  • October 20, 1954

    Minutes of the Second Meeting between Premier Zhou Enlai and Nehru

    Zhou and Nehru continue to discuss the regional situations in Asia and Africa and the overarching foreign policy views of China and India.

  • October 21, 1954

    Talking Points from Premier Zhou Enlai’s Third Meeting with Nehru

    Zhou Enlai and Nehru discuss Sino-Indian relations, as well as China and India's views toward Thailand, Indonesia, Korea, Vietnam, and Ceylon (Sri Lanka).

  • October 23, 1954

    Letter, W. F. Marquat to James Cromwell

    Major General M. F. Marquat endorses James Cromwell's "Private Enterprise Plan."

  • November 06, 1954

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, ‘Premier Zhou’s Talk with Members of Japan’s Diet’

    Zhou Enlai and Japanese Diet Members discuss Japan's relationship with the United States, the overall trends in Sino-Japanese relations, and some specific issues in Sino-Japanese relations, such as war criminals, fisheries, and communications.

  • December 07, 1954

    Department of State, Memorandum, 'Problems of Compatibility of Collective Security Negotiations with the USSR and Present US Policy Towards the Baltic States'

    History of US relations with the Baltic states and the current policy of non-recognition of Soviet control.

  • December 15, 1954

    Report from the Asia Section, Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'On the Asian-African Conference'

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry reported that Indonesia’s intention to hold the Asian-African Conference was to establish a neutral, third group to counter the US and the Soviet Union. It also reported the attitudes of the invited countries and the reactions of the Western countries toward the Conference. It concluded that it would be beneficial for China to participate in the Conference and to influence the political situation in the Conference.

  • December 22, 1954

    Soviet Translation, 'Statement of the Iran Party Regarding the Bill to Receive a Loan from Foreign Countries' (Attachment)

    The Iran Party's statement is critical of the recent loans made to Iran by the Americans and the British, which it believes will leave Iran indebted to countries that just want to exploit the people and resources of Iran. Also includes various Iranian trade figures.

  • December 25, 1954

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Regarding Our Attitude towards the Afro-Asian Conference'

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry informed Chinese embassies overseas that China supported the Asian-African Conference as well as the participation of the countries with whom China had no diplomatic relation, such as Japan, the Philippines, and Thailand. China also emphasized that Chiang Kai-shek was not to be invited to the Conference.

  • December 29, 1954

    Cable from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs Intelligence Department, 'The Agenda of the Five Southeast Asian Countries from the Bogor Conference and the Five Countries’ Attitudes towards China’s Participation in the Afro-Asian Conference '

    The agenda of the Bogor Conference was to determine the purposes, timing, and participants of the Asian-African Conference. The five Southeast Asian countries agreed that China and Japan should participate in the Asian-African Conference, but some countries also insisted on the participation of US allies such as Thailand and the Philippines.

  • 1955

    List of Brotherhood’s Leaders

    List of Muslim Brotherhood leadership in Syria, Sudan, Jordan, Libya, Italy, Germany and the U.S.

  • 1955

    View of the Asian-African Conference from the Bogor Conference

  • January 04, 1955

    Minutes of Conversation between Premier Zhou Enlai and Soviet Ambassador Pavel Yudin regarding Dag Hammarskjold’s Trip to Beijing

    The Soviet ambassador brought to Zhou Enlai a telegram between the United Nations Secretary-General Dag Hammarskjöld and the UN Assistant Secretary-General. The telegram stated that Hammarskjöld was going to visit Beijing for negotiating the release of the US pilots who had served in the Korean War and been captured by the Chinese.

  • January 06, 1955

    Record of Meetings between UN Secretary-General Dag Hammarskjold and Zhou Enlai

    Over a series of four meetings, Secretary-General Hammarskjold and Zhou Enlai discuss American prisoners in China, Chinese nationals in the US, and the US-Taiwan defense treaty.

  • January 10, 1955

    Cable from Feng Xuan, 'Reaction of Britain, United States, France towards the Kuala Lumpur Five Countries inviting China to attend the Afro-Asian Conference'

    The UK responded the decision of inviting China to attend the Asian-African Conference with anger, stating that countries in the Bogor Conference had wrong expectations toward China. The US feared that China would have great influence on the Asian-African Conference and thus weaken US influence in the region. The US and UK also worried that China’s participation would improve China-Japan relations. French press expressed this decision as the evidence of the failure of the US power in Southeast Asia.

  • January 13, 1955

    Soviet Translation, Supplement to Mardom Newspaper Published in Iran, 'The Crimes of Iranian Reaction and the Deeds of the Sons of the Fatherland are Becoming Clear to the Public Opinion of Iran and the Entire World' (Attachment)

    This supplement appeared in the "Mardom" newspaper, which was published illegally in Iran by the underground communist Tudeh (People's) Party of Iran. This article presents criticism of the Shah and his forces that are accused of working with the Americans and the British and torturing Iranians who chose to stand in opposition against him. The People's Party of Iran also pledges to continue its fight against the Shah and the Americans.

  • January 14, 1955

    Soviet Translaton, 'A Brief Summary of the 19 December 1955 Issue of the Newspaper Mardom Nº 261' (Attachment)

    This is a summary of articles found in the "Mardom" newspaper, which was published illegally in Iran by the underground communist Tudeh (People's) Party of Iran. The issue summarized condemns the Shah as a traitor and as cooperating with the Americans and the British at the cost of the Iranian civilians.