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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • May 29, 1953

    CIA Report Evaluating Vladimir Semyonov’s Appointment as Soviet High Commissioner for Germany

    A CIA report presents an analysis of the dissolution of the Soviet Control Commission (SCC) and the return of V.S. Semyonov to Germany as the Soviet High Commissioner for Germany.

  • May 29, 1953

    Cable from Ambassador Charles Bohlen to John Foster Dulles regarding Transfer of Soviet Control in East Germany to Soviet High Commissioner Vladimir Semyonov

    Bohlen informs Dulles of the transfer of Soviet Control in East Germany, which does not yet provide much indication of future Soviet policy in East Germany except the solidification of East Germany's continued existence under the control of the USSR.

  • June 02, 1953

    Cable from Major General Wilton B. Persons to Col. Robert L. Schulz Explaining the Department of State’s Views on the New Course

    The U.S. state department comments on East German announcement to ease government policies following the East German Uprising. They believe the Soviet Union intends to compromise with Western powers on Germany before the rearmament of the Federal Republic through the European Defense Community plan.

  • June 06, 1953

    Statement by President Syngman Rhee

    President Syngman Rhee strongly opposed the peace talks between the United Nations, the North Korea People’s Army, and the Chinese People’s Volunteer Army. Rhee proposed that he would accept this armistice only if the United States signed a Mutual Defense Pact and to continue to build the ROK forces after the war.

  • June 13, 1953

    Cable 5321, from Ambassador Reber in Bonn to US State, Washington

    Cable from Samuel Reber to U.S. Department of State Outlining U.S. Perspectives on Four-Power Talks

  • June 15, 1953

    Letter, John W. Staggers to Syngman Rhee

    John W. Staggeres responds to Syngman Rhee's question about his loan to "a certain Korean lady."

  • June 15, 1953

    Letter, John W. Staggers to Syngman Rhee

    John W. Staggers writes to Syngman Rhee about truce negotiations for the Korean War and issues he raised regarding Korean prisoners.

  • June 17, 1953

    Cable from SECSTATE Dulles to HICOG Bonn, 7:02 p.m. EST

    Secretary of State John F. Dulles requests full report of implementation of Infoguide Bulletins concerning East Berlin demonstrations. Dulles states that USG believes the demostration present an excellent propaganda value.

  • June 17, 1953

    Cable from Cecil Lyon to the State Department Reporting on Afternoon Meeting of the Western Commandants, 9:00 p.m. (CET)

    Lyon reports developments in Berlin and measures taken by the British, French, and American CDT’s to maintain order in West Berlin. decision to restrain the use of Allied military forces unless a widespread disturbance occurs in the West.

  • June 17, 1953

    Cable 1670, from Berlin to SECSTATE

    Cable from Cecil Lyon to U.S. Department of State Relaying Minutes of the First Meeting of the Western Military Commandants in Berlin, 6:00 p.m. CET.

  • June 17, 1953

    Psychological Strategy Board Memorandum from John M. Anspacher to George A. Morgan

    Additional suggestions for US sponsored courses of action with regard to the popular uprising in East Germany and East Berlin. While the State Department (GER) did not include these suggestions in the press guidance paper prepared, GER officers suggested several additional ideas during conversation, which were included in the memorandum.

  • June 18, 1953

    Telegram from Cecil Lyon to John Foster Dulles, Reporting on Developments in Berlin

    In a telegram following the recent uprising in East Germany, Lyon reports from Berlin that there is currently no reported action in East Berlin, and the inner city is now completely controlled by Soviet troops and police with orders that no one may enter or leave the Soviet sector.

  • June 18, 1953

    CIA Current Intelligence Review Analyzing the Communist 'New Look in East Germany' and 'Recent Unrest in Eastern Europe'

    A CIA report discusses new policy modification in East Germany following the East German Uprising. It is reported that measures are being taken by the regime to relieve political and economic tension and to improve the quality of life in East Germany. This includes shifting the some of the production of heavy machinery to the production of consumer goods. The report also reviews details on recent social unrest in Eastern Europe.

  • June 19, 1953

    CIA Current Intelligence Digest 'Comment on Berlin Rioting'

    According to the CIA report, as of the 19th of June, the situation in East Berlin has been repressed by Soviet troops and the East German police, and inter-sector traffic is strictly controlled. However, in other areas of East Germany, strikes and disturbances are still being reported.

  • June 19, 1953

    National Security Council Report, NSC 158, 'United States Objectives and Actions to Exploit the Unrest in the Satellite States'

    Recommendations adopted by the National Security Council at the suggestion of the Psychological Strategy Board on covert actions to be undertaken in the Soviet Satellite States. Authorized by the National Security Council, NSC 158 envisaged aggressive psychological warfare to exploit and heighten the unrest behind the Iron Curtain. The policy was endorsed by President Eisenhower on June 26, 1953.

  • June 19, 1953

    Minutes of Discussion at the 150th Meeting of the National Security Council, 18 June 1953

    The US National Security Council discusses recent release of prisoners of war in South Korea. The riots and disturbances in East Germany and Czechoslovakia are discussed in the context of the general “softening” of Soviet policy. The Council also discusses the possibility of a four-power meeting, and other alternative courses of action.

  • June 21, 1953

    Diary Entry from US HICOG James B. Conant on the Effects of East Zone Troubles on Russian Policy

    Conant briefly speculates over possible complications with Russian policy as a result of the East German Uprising.

  • June 21, 1953

    CIA Current Intelligence Bulletin on Comments by Charles Bohlen and the Deployment of Soviet Troops

    Charles Bohlen, ambassador to the Soviet Union, speculates on liberalization reforms in East Germany and their potential impact on Soviet leadership and the reaction of other Satellite nations, following the East German uprising.

  • June 22, 1953

    Minute from Selwyn Lloyd to Winston Churchill, Reflecting British Perspectives on the Berlin Uprising

    Lloyd emphasizes Germany’s large role in the unification of Europe, and the importance of maintaining the sympathies of the West German population. He provides suggestions for how to proceed in Germany, and requests Churchill’s views on the matter.

  • June 24, 1953

    CIA Information Report 'Continuing Resistance Among Workers'

    A CIA report states updates regarding East German workers, many of which had fled to West Berlin during the uprising on June 16-17, and their plan to continue resistance at their place of employment.