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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • October 12, 1950

    Ciphered Telegram No. 25544, Roshchin to Filippov [Stalin]

    Mao acknowledges a telegram from Stalin.

  • October 13, 1950

    Ciphered Telegram No. 25612, Roshchin to Flippov [Stalin]

    Mao Zedong asks that Zhou Enlai remain in Moscow as they discuss intervening in Korea.

  • October 14, 1950

    Ciphered Telegram, Feng Xi (Stalin) to Kim Il Sung (via Shtykov)

    Telegram from Stalin to Kim Il Sung informing him of the finalization of China's decision to send troops to North Korea's aid.

  • October 14, 1950

    Letter from Zhou Enlai to Stalin

    Zhou Enlai requests military equipment and support for Chinese operations from the Soviet side, and asks for instructions on solving the issue of command relationships between the North Korean, Chinese, and Soviet forces.

  • October 29, 1950

    Telegram from I.V. Stalin to Mao Zedong

    Stalin agrees to receive Chinese naval advisers.

  • November 09, 1950

    Protocol No. 78 of a Meeting of the Special Committee Under the Council of Ministers of the USSR

    Draft telegram to Roshchin on Chinese participation in the UN Security Council.

  • November 09, 1950

    CC Politburo Decision with Approved Message from Gromyko to Roshchin with Message for Zhou Enlai

    Telegram from Gromyko to Zhou Enlai advising the latter to turn down the invitation for China to participate in the UN Security Council. It also explains the circumstances under which the invitation was obtained.

  • November 16, 1950

    Ciphered telegram, Zhou Enlai to Filippov (Stalin)

    Request from Zhou Enlai to Stalin for specific quantities of automobiles and fluids necessary for their operation--oil, grease, gasoline etc--in conjunction with movement of troops to North Korea.

  • December 05, 1950

    VKP(b) CC Politburo decision with approved orders to Vyshinsky in New York and Roshchin in Beijing with message for Zhou Enlai

    Memorandums from the VKP(b) CC to Vyshinsky and Roshchin regarding the Soviet and PRC stances on discussions in the UN General Assembly and Security Council on the Chinese intervention in Korea.

  • December 07, 1950

    Ciphered telegram, Gromyko to Roshchin Transmitting Message from Filippov (Stalin) to Zhou Enlai

    Message from Stalin to Zhou Enlai agreeing with Chinese conditions for a ceasefire and advising that the Chinese limit negotiations on a ceasefire until Seoul is liberated.

  • December 07, 1950

    Ciphered telegram from Roshchin conveying message from Zhou Enlai to Soviet Government

    A telegram from Roshchin in Beijing to Moscow, informing the Soviet leadership of the terms under which the Chinese will consider an armistice on the Korean Peninsula.

  • January 02, 1951

    Special Report No.1 from the Korean Embassy in China to the Office of the President, 'The Secret Sino-Soviet Military Agreement'

    The Korean embassy in Taipei reports to Syngman Rhee with details on the alleged 'secret Sino-Soviet military agreement'.

  • January 13, 1951

    Ciphered telegram, Zakharov to Filippov (Stalin)

    Telegram to Stalin informing him that his telegram of 11 January to Mao was received 12 January by Zhou Enlai.

  • January 16, 1951

    Ciphered telegram from Mao Zedong to Filippov (Stalin)

    A message from Mao to Stalin on the topic of military credit and its particulars.

  • January 20, 1951

    Report from P. F. Yudin to I. V. Stalin on Meetings with the Leaders of the Communist Party of China, including Mao Zedong on 31 December 1950

    Yudin recounts his meetings with Mao Zedong, Liu Shaoqi, and Zhou Enlai. In three meetings, Yudin learned more about China's relations with other communist parties in Asia, economic conditions in China, and developments in the Korean War.

  • January 27, 1951

    Telegram from Mao Zedong to I.V. Stalin, Conveying the 19 January 1951 Telegram from Peng Dehuai to Mao Zedong regarding Meetings with Kim Il Sung

    The telegram from Peng Dehuai discusses the results of a meeting with Kim Il Sung, including Kim Il Sung’s belief that the Korean People’s Army cannot defeat the Americans alone, the defense of the Korea's coast, the re-staffing of five corps, and preparations for soldiers to carry out work in the newly liberated areas.

  • January 29, 1951

    Telegram from Mao Zedong to I.V. Stalin, conveying 28 January 1951 telegram from Mao Zedong to Peng Dehuai

    A forward to Stalin of a message sent earlier by Mao to Peng Dehuai. It outlines operational plans for the PLA and KPA in and around Seoul and talks about the need to gain an advantageous military position with negotiations in mind.

  • January 30, 1951

    Ciphered telegram, Filippov (Stalin) to Mao Zedong

    Telegram from Stalin to Mao acknowledging receipt of his latest telegram on KPA and PLA operational plans.

  • February 22, 1951

    Reception of the Chairman of the Xinjiang Provincial Government, Burhan, 20 February 1951

    In the conversation Burhan informed that in 1950 the Central government of the PRC requested the Soviet government to send Soviet specialists for work in Xinjiang. In connection with this, Bukhan described the request of the Xinjiang government for the following specialists: engineers—in hydro-technology, agronomy, veterinary technology, medicine, veterinary medicine and teaching. Burhan expressed the suggestion that these specialists could be used in the capacity of specialists in the Xinjiang provincial government. The request is being considered by the Soviet government.

  • May 24, 1951

    Memorandum of Conversation, Soviet Ambassador to China N.V. Roshchin with Indian Ambassador K.M. Panikkar, 3 May 1951

    On 3 May Roshchin was at a reception of the Indian ambassador Panikkar. At the reception many different representatives were present. During the reception Panikkar expressed his great frustration over his difficult situation regarding the export of grain from China, and informed that in the current situation in India there is no way to produce the quantity of grain that they could receive from China. There was given special attention to the Czechoslovak representatives and trade delegation.