Search in
ADD SEARCH FILTER CANCEL SEARCH FILTER

Digital Archive International History Declassified

SEARCH RESULTS

  • November 05, 1956

    Working Notes from the Session of the CPSU CC Presidium on 5 November 1956

    Members of the CPSU CC Presidium consider changing the name of the Hungarian Worker’s Party (HWP).

  • November 05, 1956

    Controversy Over Radio Free Europe Broadcasting

    Radio Free Europe (RFE) Director Conerey Egan reports RFE broadcasting policy problems to CIA.

  • November 05, 1956

    Radio Free Europe Encrypted Telex MUN 70, Richard Condon to W. J. Conerey Egan

    Richard Condon, the European Director of Radio Free Europe in Munich, messages with information about RFE personnel still inside Hungary.

  • November 05, 1956

    Memorandum of Conversation with the Chinese Ambassador to the DPRK Qiao Xiaoguang

    The PRC intervention of Mikoyan and Peng Dehuai regarding the September Plenum is discussed, along with the possibility of the critics of Kim Il Sung's leadership returning from the PRC.

  • November 05, 1956

    Report about an Excursion to Geumgangsan (Diamond Mountains)

    A report on the excursion to Geumgangsan of a delegation of the Soviets and East Germans.

  • November 06, 1956

    Letter, L. George Paik to President Syngman Rhee

    L. George Paik updates President Syngman Rhee on the proceedings of the Asian Peoples' Anti-Communist League Conference in Manila.

  • November 06, 1956

    Working Notes from the Session of the CPSU CC Presidium on 6 November 1956

    Debate occurs at this CC session between Molotov, who opposes approving the appeal written by the Provisional CC of the Hungarian Socialist Worker’s Party, and the other members of the CC who desire approving the document. Molotov is concerned about the unknown composition of the CC of the HSWP, the condemnations of former Hungarian Worker’s Party (HWP) politicians, the issue of renaming the HWP, and the risk that Hungary will become the next Yugoslavia. Khrushchev states that Molotov is “clung to the cult of Stalin” and that Molotov is considering bringing back Rakosi and Hegedus.

  • November 07, 1956

    From the diary of D.T. Shepilov

    In his diary, Shepilov pledges to investigate the circumstances surrounding tank fire near the Yugoslav embassy in Budapest. Promises are made to investigate the story and report back to Yugoslavian officials. Shepilov notes that Yugoslavian Ambassador Micunovic agrees with judgments made about Nagy. Shepilov expresses consternation at how Yugoslavia can provide refuge for Nagy and condemn him. References to a meeting in Brioni between Khrushchev, Malenkov and Tito detail the opinions of Yugoslav and Soviet officials concerning Nagy.

  • November 08, 1956

    Letter No. 29 from the President to Minister Duk Shin Choi

    President Rhee briefly praises South Vietnam's reparations negotiations with Japan.

  • November 08, 1956

    CDS Report No. 23 from Choi Duk Shin to the President (Syngman Rhee)

    Choi Duk Shin reports on the delivery of President Rhee's letter to President Diem, Vietnam-Taiwan relations on the topic of Chinese minorities living in Vietnam, and recent South Vietnam affairs including an exhibit displaying proofs of Communist Viet Minh activities.

  • November 08, 1956

    Department of State, Outgoing Telegram to Moscow Embassy

    The State Department requests that the embassy find out the status of an American citizen who works for Radio Free Europe who was detained in Hungary by Soviet military authorities.

  • November 08, 1956

    Letter of the CC UCY to the CC CPSU with an exposition of the views of the leadership of the UCY on the events in Hungary

    In this letter, the Central Committee of Yugoslavia responds to the CC CPSU over questions concerning Yugoslavia’s decision to provide shelter to Nagy and his group at their embassy. The letter begins by expressing agreement on the weakness of Nagy’s government, the need to form a new government under Kadar, and the existence of “honest communists” in Nagy’s government that could assist Kadar. The letter relates that Yugoslavia cannot hand Nagy and his group over to authorities because of the domestic consequences of such an action. The correspondence ends with both the suggestion of amnesty for Nagy and Yugoslavia’s disavowal of any connection to Nagy or the uprising.

  • November 09, 1956

    Impressions of Radio Free Europe Hungarian Broadcasts

    Frank Wisner discusses impressions of RFE broadcasts with interlocutors in Vienna

  • November 09, 1956

    Radio Free Europe Encrypted Telex MUN 157, Richard Condon to W. J. Conerey Egan

    Richard Condon, Radio Free Europe (RFE) European Director reports on the border situation in late October and RFE staff who entered Hungary to report on the developing revolt there.

  • November 09, 1956

    Department of State, Incoming Telegram No. 1129

    US Ambassador to Moscow Charles Bohlen reports that he is sending a personal note to Foreign Affairs Minister Gromyko.

  • November 09, 1956

    Department of State, Incoming Telegram No. 1130

    Text of a personal note sent by Ambassador Bohlen to Foreign Affairs Minister Gromyko regarding an American citizen being detained in Hungary.

  • November 11, 1956

    Department of State, Incoming Telegram No. 1270

    The Embassy in Vienna reports that Radio Free Europe (RFE) staff recently detained in Hungary arrived safely in Austria.

  • November 12, 1956

    Radio Free Europe Encrypted Telex MUN 135, Richard Condon to W. J. Conerey Egan

    Richard Condon, Radio Free Europe (RFE) European Director reports the release of RFE staff from detention in Gyor, Hungary.

  • November 14, 1956

    US Government Appraisal of Radio Free Europe Broadcasts

    Cord Meyer forwards to Allen Dulles a State Department assessment dated November 13, 1956, of Radio Free Europe Hungarian and Polish broadcasts. The assessment was requested by Secretary of State John Foster Dulles and was prepared by State Department official L. Randolph Higgs, responsible for coordinating RFE issues with CIA, and Meyer, who objected to an initial State Department draft.

  • November 15, 1956

    CDS Report No. 24 from Choi Duk Shin to the President (Syngman Rhee)

    Choi Duk Shin offers his views on the crises in Hungary and the Middle East, urges President Rhee to organize immediate action against communist countries, and reports on Vietnamese domestic affairs including the recent typhoon and the continued Chinese minority debate.